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View Full Version : How many gallons expect employe to spray?


replenish&subdue
01-21-2009, 02:11 PM
When I sprayed I could spray 400 gallons with little problem. I'm wanting to be fair with a goal for my employees to reach but wonder at teir results. How many gallons or do you have a quota or know what others require for their employees to spray out. I have about 300 customers all within 10 minutes of my office. I have a 500 gallon tank which I fill in a couple minutes by fire hydrant. We spray 3 gallons/minute pressure.

NattyLawn
01-21-2009, 02:18 PM
What's the average lawn size?
I assume the routes are pretty tight being all within 10 minutes of the office..
What are you spraying? Is it just fill the tank with one product and spray? So the tech comes in in the morning, fills and goes?
Have you run the route? What's reasonable for you?

Turfdoctor1
01-21-2009, 02:30 PM
When I sprayed I could spray 400 gallons with little problem. I'm wanting to be fair with a goal for my employees to reach but wonder at teir results. How many gallons or do you have a quota or know what others require for their employees to spray out. I have about 300 customers all within 10 minutes of my office. I have a 500 gallon tank which I fill in a couple minutes by fire hydrant. We spray 3 gallons/minute pressure.

i am a solo operator, so I don't know what to expect from employees. but, I can tell that 400 gallons seems reasonable to me. I would think 5 acres or so should be very reasonable.

If you don't mind me asking, do you do other services as well? If not, how do you keep multiple employees busy with 300 accounts?

replenish&subdue
01-21-2009, 02:41 PM
We spray 3x's,fertil. 3x's,lime 1x. Fescue seed about 50 in fall,about 10 in spring.We do fescue fertil.3x's,spray 2x's.We have a shrub program w/2x fertil.,3 x's insecticide,1 dormant oil. Also a boxwood program 2 x's.

RigglePLC
01-21-2009, 03:05 PM
Replensh,
500 gallons, 3 gallons per minute--that is 166 miutes spraying time. What do they do the rest of the day? LOL! 13 to 15 lawns per day would work fine, that is only about 390 gallons. But a lot depends on time needed for filling tank and bookwork, clean up, wash truck. A lot depends on driving time. If they drive less than 50 miles, easy. If they drive 150 miles--very busy day. Get some mapping software or use Yahoo maps. It will show you the driving time for each trip with stops. Figure the time to spray or spread the grass. You should quickly get a feel for how much time a route takes. Be sure your tech records the exact time when he starts each job--you will be able to spot those long lunch breaks pretty quick. Remember TruGreen has a quota of about $1000 per day--they expect about 150 to 200,000 sqft per day.

KES
01-21-2009, 11:25 PM
First, I think you need to consider the size of the yards. With 500 gallons @ 3gal/min you would be able to spray around 167000 sq ft. If the yards are big, say 15000 sq ft yards then you get around 11 - 12 yards a day. The smaller the yard the number goes up. I would try to mix the yards up with small and large to get a $ amount that will pay for the employee and where he can do it and not rush.
What I'm trying to say is make sure you get your moneys worth out of him. Do not pay the guy to do $300 a day and pay him $500 a week.

LawnTamer
01-22-2009, 12:02 AM
400 gallons is a big day for me, but I spray 2gpm and do mostly small lawns, about 5k. When I have big jobs, I spray a lot more. I did an 8 acre park once, sprayed well over 600 gallons, (this was with a 200 gal spacesaver) and I was still done for the day by 3pm.

On a normal day, I spray about 300-350 gallons, which is 30-35 lawns, of course many of those people are receiving other services too, like Dormant oil for their shrubs, or perimeter spray for bugs, which is not included in that 300-350 gal.

greendoctor
01-22-2009, 12:33 AM
400 gallons is a big day for me, but I spray 2gpm and do mostly small lawns, about 5k. When I have big jobs, I spray a lot more. I did an 8 acre park once, sprayed well over 600 gallons, (this was with a 200 gal spacesaver) and I was still done for the day by 3pm.

On a normal day, I spray about 300-350 gallons, which is 30-35 lawns, of course many of those people are receiving other services too, like Dormant oil for their shrubs, or perimeter spray for bugs, which is not included in that 300-350 gal.

My record is over 10 acres from a skid mount and boom. 100 gallons per acre, start at 10 AM , done about 3PM. 1000 gallons total, refill every 100 gallons.

grassman177
01-22-2009, 10:21 PM
i thnk 400 is a good number, for aaverage lawns and stuff. ia hve done 600 myslef and i was pretty damn tired from that one, hence no more tank for me, rideons now. but 4oo is very attainable.

HoseJockey
01-23-2009, 10:23 AM
what area of Memphis do you generally run in?

Ric
01-23-2009, 11:21 AM
IMHO I feel there is not enough information given to make a fair judgement call on production. There are just too many factors involved to set a quota of gallons. One day I spray one condo using 300 gallons in 2.5 hours. This included dragging hose around several building. Next day I spend 6 hours spraying 10 Home yards using under 200 gallons.

I am a one man band now, but have had employees in the past. I never paid a production commission or pushed my employees to do fast work. I would give a bonus for selling new customers. But what I used as incentives was a Quarterly bonus based on company profit. I stressed all factors that effected the bottom line to my employees. Customer retention and equipment care being the big points. New employees are not going to produce like an old pro. I feel it is more important they do the work correctly the FIRST time than do a bunch of work. Speed will increase naturally as they gain experience. The Quarterly Bonus is intended to get them thinking company success is their success. Daily commissions cause self goals of money today regardless of the cost to the company. That is just my 2 cents.

Hissing Cobra
01-24-2009, 01:25 AM
I agree. We need more information such as how much square footage does each of your employees service? How many lawns? Do you do each round on a 6 week schedule? I used to spray at a 2 gallon rate and would use between 200-250 gallons daily, which would equal 100,000 - 125,000 sq. ft. daily.

As for production, when I worked for The Lawn Company of Cape Cod, we had 3 goals to strive for everyday of the week. We were told that if we "hit" 2 of the 3 goals on a daily basis everyday of every week, we would finish our customers off in a 6 week period and be ready to start the next round on time. Also, for each week that we "hit" these goals, the goals for the following week and each subsequent week were reduced. I had appoximately 450 customers in my route and my goals would be something like this:

Week 1: 16 stops per day, 100,000 sq. ft. per day, or $940.00 per day.

Week 2: 13 stops per day, 92,000 sq. ft. per day, or $860.00 per day.

Week 3: 10 stops per day, 84,000 sq. ft. per day, or $790.00 per day.

Week 4: 7 stops per day, 73,000 sq. ft. per day, or $710.00 per day.

Week 5: 5 stops per day, 65,000 sq. ft. per day, or $640.00 per day.

Week 6: 3 stops per day, 50,000 sq. ft. per day or $500.00 per day.

By trying to "hit" 2 of those goals everyday, you were guaranteed that your route full of customers would have their lawns serviced every 6 weeks. Of course, we were always encouraged to produce more and I always strived to exceed all 3 of those goals on a daily basis. I usually did and as a result, I would still be banging out 10 or 11 stops daily, with 100,000 sq. ft. and $850.00 every day, even during my 5th week. This enabled me to finish my route early and help out other people with their routes who weren't "giving their all". We had 3 branches of our business so I would go to one of the other locations and work there for a week or more during every round.

We also had bonuses paid out at the mid-year and year-end and they were paid out based on sales, equipment condition, attendance, appearance and other criteria. I used to earn good bonuses in July and December!

Then Scotts came in and bought the company out. I won't dive into what happened to the company after that.

Ric
01-24-2009, 10:28 AM
Hissing Cobra

While production goals to stay on schedule are important, Keeping production customer retention friendly is also important. Your schedule seems to have that build in. You start with heavy goals but by the end of the 6 weeks production schedule is lighter to allow catching up for lost or slow days.

I can not stress enough to take the time to do the job right the first time. More time and customers are lost because of this factor than any other. The effects are not always apparent right a way. But when customer start dropping or not renewing it is too late. This last year a Very Big Boy Company in my area is finding this out the hard way much to my economic advantage. They had a very good reputation that is now gone. Higher costs this last year were dealt with by cutting both staff and product. They didn't lay anyone off but they didn't replace any employees who left. Now lack of renews and just plain cancellations are numbering a 100 a month. Doing the job right the first time might not look as good on the daily books, but in the long run it has many advantages over the quick daily profit. Some how I see too many over look the big picture. Doing things right the first means taking care of equipment and customer satisfaction. In the long run these relate to lower maintenance advertising costs by word of mouth advertising which can not be purchased for cash money. It takes a great deal of time and effort to Brand a Name and build a reputation. It only takes a short time to blow it.

Hissing Cobra
01-24-2009, 11:06 AM
Hissing Cobra

While production goals to stay on schedule are important, Keeping production customer retention friendly is also important. Your schedule seems to have that build in. You start with heavy goals but by the end of the 6 weeks production schedule is lighter to allow catching up for lost or slow days.

I can not stress enough to take the time to do the job right the first time. More time and customers are lost because of this factor than any other. The effects are not always apparent right a way. But when customer start dropping or not renewing it is too late. This last year a Very Big Boy Company in my area is finding this out the hard way much to my economic advantage. They had a very good reputation that is now gone. Higher costs this last year were dealt with by cutting both staff and product. They didn't lay anyone off but they didn't replace any employees who left. Now lack of renews and just plain cancellations are numbering a 100 a month. Doing the job right the first time might not look as good on the daily books, but in the long run it has many advantages over the quick daily profit. Some how I see too many over look the big picture. Doing things right the first means taking care of equipment and customer satisfaction. In the long run these relate to lower maintenance advertising costs by word of mouth advertising which can not be purchased for cash money. It takes a great deal of time and effort to Brand a Name and build a reputation. It only takes a short time to blow it.

Ric,

You couldn't be more correct! At The Lawn Company where I used to work, we could take the time to talk to customers, do the job right, make new sales, and make good bonuses. We had a system that worked very good. Our yearly retention rates were around 89% - 90% and WE OWNED the CAPE COD market with an 80% share of the lawn care business. Our competitors in that area fought for the remaining 20% share! In fact, the University of Massachusetts would do a survey every year of the top companies in Massachusetts on customer service and our company would win this award constantly.

Then Scotts bought us out..........You should see what remains.

Ric
01-24-2009, 12:14 PM
Ric,

You couldn't be more correct! At The Lawn Company where I used to work, we could take the time to talk to customers, do the job right, make new sales, and make good bonuses. We had a system that worked very good. Our yearly retention rates were around 89% - 90% and WE OWNED the CAPE COD market with an 80% share of the lawn care business. Our competitors in that area fought for the remaining 20% share! In fact, the University of Massachusetts would do a survey every year of the top companies in Massachusetts on customer service and our company would win this award constantly.

Then Scotts bought us out..........You should see what remains.

Cobra

The other side of the coin is to sell sell sell and then Sell what you have Sold. Then Buy back at a faction of the cost. A Conveniences Store owner in my area is on his second go round in the same locations. Builds them up then sells the business which takes a drive and he buys them again. I know a guy that sold his Bar 4 times and bought it back 3 times. The final time he retired a happy camper. The bottom line is not everyone can run a business. Corporate America seems too bend on profit and not concerned with customer care.

Runner
01-24-2009, 11:42 PM
Ric,

You couldn't be more correct!
Yeah,...Like we haven't heard THAT before! LOL:)
Anyway, I haven't really been around in awhile (been next door with the "plowing" crew). Good info on this thread, but I'd like to ask one question - and I really don't mean to get off the beaten path, but the original poster mentioned that he fills his chemical tank up through a fire hydrant. How does one even DO that? I know that permits are obtainable, and meters are leased for use of hydrants, but I was always under the understanding it was for clean water tanks, swimming pools, and things like that. I couldn't even IMAGINE hooking up a city water source such as a hydrant directly up to a chemical tank...backflow preventer of not. Am I missing something?:confused:

greendoctor
01-25-2009, 04:06 AM
You do this only if there are provisions to prevent cross connection and backflow to the potable water supply. For such a high hazard situation, I know an air gap passes as backflow prevention. An air gap is a rigidly mounted fill pipe positioned in such a way that the highest possible liquid level, even an overflow situation cannot possibly reach the outlet of the fill pipe. In Hawaii, that is specified as double the diameter of the fill pipe above the top of the tank opening. 11/2" fill pipe is to be mounted with the outlet 3" above the tank opening. That is even though a legal hydrant tap here has an RPZ coupled immediately after the water meter. I have an air gap made with 3/4" pipe, that is at least 2" above the tank opening. Coupling a hose to the bottom of the tank or just dropping a hose into the tank opening.:nono::hammerhead: The inspectors here would not care that your water line has that RPZ installed. An air gap is specified.

greendoctor
01-25-2009, 04:22 AM
I think I have said this before. If you spill and overflow while filling, that is a sign of total carelessness. When I have water running into my tank, that is not my time to take a nap, have coffee, mentally undress the blond jogging down the road, etc. My full and undivided attention is on the tank. To measure out liquids, that is done pouring into the measuring cup with the cup inside of a plastic bucket capable of holding entire contents of the jug I am pouring from. 2/12 gallon pack 5 gallon bucket. Far cry from the way the pineapple plantations did things. 5000 gallon sprayer at a central filling area, overflowing. Given the white powder on the ground from the spill, that was probably atrazine or Hyvar. Things you do not want spilled on the ground.

Ric
01-25-2009, 11:14 AM
Runner

My town doesn't give permits for fire hydrants, But several areas around me do. Marco Island is one town that did and maybe still does. The way it hooks up in most case is with a standard 3/4 garden hose to a fitting you place on the hydrant. The 3/4 back flow is normally already there. Some people use larger hoses for faster filling. I have not seen the water meter that some places use. But the bottom line is you need special fitting and a large wrench to turn the Hydrant on. In my town several hydrants actually have hose bibb fitting on them when located in islands for watering plants. Of course I have on occasion taken advantage of this water supply in a pinch as has many. At present time I am filling from my well which only uses a 3/4 line. A big time difference from when I had the 2" fill pipe at my old nursery. I now use a timer that shuts off automatic when filling my mix tank. I only set the timer to fill the tank about 3/4 full to save time. I know this isn't totally kosher but my mix tank is on a concrete pad with containment sides.

americanlawn
01-25-2009, 07:51 PM
In '79, we drove eight 1200 gallon ChemLawn tankers to Memphis, Tennessee from our Dallas, Texas branch. This was cuz the Memphis branch had employee prob's, and it was way behind schedule. They even hired high school kids to wash the trucks. (I think guys were on strike).

We had two guys in each tanker. (two hose reels). All of us sprayed from dawn 'til dusk. Every tanker went through 2400 gallons of weed & feed. (having to fill back up by early afternoon). We sprayed 4 gallons per 1000.

ChemLawn allowed us 2 meals per day & one long distance phone call per night. My route was the "Germantown" area. I also remember driving by the Elvis Presley estate.




When I sprayed I could spray 400 gallons with little problem. I'm wanting to be fair with a goal for my employees to reach but wonder at teir results. How many gallons or do you have a quota or know what others require for their employees to spray out. I have about 300 customers all within 10 minutes of my office. I have a 500 gallon tank which I fill in a couple minutes by fire hydrant. We spray 3 gallons/minute pressure.