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fireman1173005
01-22-2009, 11:56 AM
Ok I stopped by Lesco this morning and priced some products but I need help figuring the cost/1,000 sq. ft.

See if this is right.

Product A comes in a 2.5 gallon jug. and says to add 30oz. per 100 gallons of water. (I have a 100 gallon tank) And apply at 2 Gallons of mixed product per 1,000 sq. ft.

I know that there is 320 oz. in a 2.5 gallon jug and the product cost $60 for the jug.

So first I figure out my cost per ounce. $60/320 oz. = 0.1875 cents per ounce.

I need 30 oz. per tank so that will cost me 30oz. X 0.1875 cents =$5.63 per tank.

I need to spray 2 gallons per 1,000 sq. ft. of mixed product and I have a 100 gallon tank so I can spray 50 gallons X 1,000sq. ft. = 50,000sq. ft. of spraying per tank.

But now I am lost on how to figure it out, I am new at this and need some help.

Brian

KACYDS
01-22-2009, 12:08 PM
You know it cost $5.63 per 100 gallon tank.

You also know that a 100 gallon tank, at 2 gals per 1000 sq.ft., will do 50,000 sq. ft.

Take 5.63 (cost per 100 gal tank) divide that by 50 ( tank will do 50 x 1000 sq. ft) and that gives you roughly $0.11 per 1000 sq. ft.

Hopefull that helps

Runner
01-22-2009, 01:11 PM
Then add overlap, drift, cost of purchasing the chemical(s) - transport, time, storage, etc.., Then, you have your other various supplies (anti foam, spreader sticker, etc.), fuel to run equipment. Now, this only covers your material costs...This s NOT your operating costs. Make sure you figure ALL this in so you don't cut yourself short.

Ric
01-22-2009, 01:22 PM
Brian

I believe you are making it hard on yourself. I wouldn't do the 100 gallon part. I would first find the cost per oz of the chemical. Then I would multiply it by the the label rate per thousand that you plan to use.

whereas $ 60.00 / 320 = $ 0.1875 per oz.

whereas 30 oz on 50 k = 0.6 oz per thousand.

Therefore 0.6 x 0.1875 = $ 0.1123 chemical cost per thousand.



Runner

I add in an extra 10% cost factor for shrinkage or over application etc. Also don't forget to use sales tax and final jug cost.

I use Microsoft Excel as a cost program. I have each product I use set up so as the price changes I only need to enter or change the price. Excel then kicks out my new cost per thousand in every mix I use that has that chemical in. I can view each chemical cost and also my standard mixes. Of course fertilizer has been the big cost concern this last year or so. since math is math it works on both liquid and granular.

fireman1173005
01-22-2009, 02:21 PM
Ahhh, thanks for the help!!!

Brian

Ric
01-23-2009, 03:52 PM
Ahhh, thanks for the help!!!

Brian

Fireman

I couldn't help to notice you ask this same question on an other Forum word for word. Only I also see you got grief and punishment instead of answers. I don't like to carry tales but that wasn't right.

fireman1173005
01-23-2009, 05:39 PM
yea, people don't seem to be as nice there. I appreciate everyone's help!!!

RigglePLC
01-23-2009, 07:05 PM
Fire,
KAYCDS and Ric are right. Is this for cool season or warm season grass? On cool season grass--most 3-way products are used a little heavier, 1.1 to 1.5 ounce per 1000 sqft. Unless you are applying to southern grasses. Be sure to take a careful look at the label.

mattfromNY
01-23-2009, 08:08 PM
Brian

I believe you are making it hard on yourself. I wouldn't do the 100 gallon part. I would first find the cost per oz of the chemical. Then I would multiply it by the the label rate per thousand that you plan to use.

whereas $ 60.00 / 320 = $ 0.1875 per oz.

whereas 30 oz on 50 k = 0.6 oz per thousand.

Therefore 0.6 x 0.1875 = $ 0.1123 chemical cost per thousand.



Runner

I add in an extra 10% cost factor for shrinkage or over application etc. Also don't forget to use sales tax and final jug cost.

I use Microsoft Excel as a cost program. I have each product I use set up so as the price changes I only need to enter or change the price. Excel then kicks out my new cost per thousand in every mix I use that has that chemical in. I can view each chemical cost and also my standard mixes. Of course fertilizer has been the big cost concern this last year or so. since math is math it works on both liquid and granular.

Ric,
you rock!
I've been killing myself trying to figure costs of various materials this winter, trying to put together a quick way to figure estimates.
After reading your post, I went into Microsoft spreadsheet and set up a quick converter for liquid, and one for granular. Man, what a timesaver!
Thanks,
Matt. :cool2:

Ric
01-23-2009, 08:49 PM
Ric,
you rock!
I've been killing myself trying to figure costs of various materials this winter, trying to put together a quick way to figure estimates.
After reading your post, I went into Microsoft spreadsheet and set up a quick converter for liquid, and one for granular. Man, what a timesaver!
Thanks,
Matt. :cool2:

Matt

Glad you liked it and found it valuable. Excel is very easy to set up and a excellent tool for all kinds of number work. I have costs right at my finger tips at all times. I use a different line for each product then even get totals of tank mixes by the tank and per thousand. Once set up, you only need keep the prices of chemicals current.

DUSTYCEDAR
01-24-2009, 12:36 AM
Oh yeah never trust what is in a jug some have more than 320 oz

Ric
01-24-2009, 10:53 AM
Oh yeah never trust what is in a jug some have more than 320 oz

Dusty

While math is a perfect science, Man is not.

KACYDS
01-24-2009, 11:29 AM
Dusty

While math is a perfect science, Man is not.

I thought that you were, Ric. :laugh::laugh::laugh:

Ric
01-24-2009, 11:33 AM
I thought that you were, Ric. :laugh::laugh::laugh:

Kacyds

Yes I walk on water and don't you forget it.

b.lawncare
01-28-2009, 10:41 PM
:waving:I read you messages about figuring out the cost of a chemical per 100 gal tank. I'm trying to figure out what I should charge a customer each time I spray. I know that I should charge for the cost of the chemical,time spent,gas,water used, and things like that. I'm wondering if you've had any luck figuring out a base price to charge customers per spraying. Some people i've talked to charge by the gallon and some people charge by the sqft. I'm lost can you help?

Ric
01-29-2009, 12:06 PM
:waving:I read you messages about figuring out the cost of a chemical per 100 gal tank. I'm trying to figure out what I should charge a customer each time I spray. I know that I should charge for the cost of the chemical,time spent,gas,water used, and things like that. I'm wondering if you've had any luck figuring out a base price to charge customers per spraying. Some people i've talked to charge by the gallon and some people charge by the sqft. I'm lost can you help?


B

Everyone bids job a little different. You need to find one method that works for you and stick with it. IMHO Sq Ft is more accurate than gallons.

mngrassguy
01-29-2009, 02:46 PM
I just get my costs /k from my supplier. He usually just figures it quick and tells me.

Ric
01-29-2009, 06:20 PM
B


I got you message about what to charge. I can not tell you what to charge in your market. There are too many factors that I don't know about your market.

daveyo
01-29-2009, 06:35 PM
Ric,
you rock!
I've been killing myself trying to figure costs of various materials this winter, trying to put together a quick way to figure estimates.
After reading your post, I went into Microsoft spreadsheet and set up a quick converter for liquid, and one for granular. Man, what a timesaver!
Thanks,
Matt. :cool2:


That's really good, then I'm assuming you can easily gather charts and other data to compare from year to year. I am manually entering all my costs in word and every year I have to change my product costs, and recalculate my pricing a real pain. I need to brush up on excel and start entering the product I use.

Ric
01-30-2009, 02:00 PM
Yo guys

I will be the first to admit my grammar and spelling is very poor. But I make up for it with my math skills. Understanding your numbers is only half the battle. First you must accumulate those numbers before you can understand them. I like Quick-books because it gives my month end, year end and previous year or month numbers. But it does not give future projected numbers. Future numbers fall to a Guesstimating process. The more numbers you have from past and current times, the better your guess of future numbers. Excel is a big help in giving me meaning full numbers.

Excel can also be used for bidding large jobs where multiply tasks are required. Each task is set up on Excel as a lineal ft or sq ft depending on the job. Example is edging or weed eating. By measuring the property you simply enter the lineal or Sq Ft and Excel kicks out a number for that part of the job. This is called FORMULA Bidding and is only as good as the Setup and Input. Back when I did contract mowing I used Excel on larger properties to bid cost plus margin for a set hard dollar bid. Knowing how long it took my slowest worker to edge a 100 ft was the number I used. I had Excel set up to adjust the hourly rate by entering only one number for all tasks or just each single task. By being able to adjust those number I came up with a competitive bid. Today I only fert & squirt so I no longer use that Excel program I wrote. But I still use Excel for my current material cost of chemicals. I then add a margin and over head to that number to come up with a Per Sq ft Formula price that might be adjusted by the size of the property. BTW Because I am in a year round market I make my per application price the same year round. But I base the price on a yearly average. Sure my margin varies but I see this as a marketing or sale advantage. Many of my customers have me set up on Auto Pay each month which a big advantage to know the money is there each and every month on time.

daveyo
01-30-2009, 02:49 PM
I don't have a problem bidding jobs at all, my overhead is fixed so no problem. Yea it takes time to figure it all out but its a one time deal. Now job tasking is also easy its a matter of experience, I take every job separately and don't get caught up in fixed numbers for that. It can be a barometer though which would be no problem. Now Ric if you would be so kind and hand over a copy of your excell spreadsheet for chemical material cost it would be greatly appreciated payup

Ric
01-30-2009, 03:38 PM
I don't have a problem bidding jobs at all, my overhead is fixed so no problem. Yea it takes time to figure it all out but its a one time deal. Now job tasking is also easy its a matter of experience, I take every job separately and don't get caught up in fixed numbers for that. It can be a barometer though which would be no problem. Now Ric if you would be so kind and hand over a copy of your excell spreadsheet for chemical material cost it would be greatly appreciated payup

Daveyo

My Excel program wouldn't be the same as the Excel program you would want to use. Therefore I suggest you set up your own. Any fool should be able to do it. Take the price paid per item times your sales tax rate plus 1 in my case 1.07 to get total price plus any delivery fees. Then divide that price by the units you use that product. Ounces when dealing with liquids or pounds for granules. Now take that unit times the Per Thousand rate. Bang you have the cost per thousand. Or course we mix cocktails so write a line that adds your normal tank mix for a total per thousand cost.

daveyo
01-30-2009, 03:51 PM
I understand calculating cost per thousand I have all that data already, what I'm figuring is there's a formula needed to be inputted into the excell cells. This way it automatically recalculates the rest of the data. I did a lot of excell in college but thats going back a while I'll just go do it and see what happens.

OK got it!! simple formula