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phasthound
01-22-2009, 06:28 PM
I know this does not apply to turf, yeah right.

http://www.cnn.com/2009/TECH/science/01/22/study.forests.dying/index.html

Take it seriously. Our ancestors (kids & grand kids) will think better of us if we act on this knowledge and do whatever we can to slow this down.

There really is no reason we cannot continue with our chosen profession and reduce the impact we have on our environment.

Everything is connected to everything else. Everything we do has consequences. This is not a doomsday prophesy, but a wake up call for all of us to improve what we do in our personal lives and professions.

PS, I am a pragmatist not a "left wing tree hugger". It's not about "saving the planet". The planet will survive, will our lifestyles?

I'm glad I'm 57, not 27.

whoopassonthebluegrass
01-22-2009, 06:46 PM
Oh you poor man. You've been sucked into the abyss...

JB1
01-22-2009, 06:48 PM
Oh you poor man. You've been sucked into the abyss...


he has crossed over.

lifetree
01-22-2009, 07:25 PM
OK ... I did what I wasn't told to do ... I read half of the article !! :laugh: :laugh:

phasthound
01-22-2009, 08:14 PM
Well then, please enlighten me. How wrong is the scientific community? Why shouldn't we look to improving what we do? Using products that require less oil & natural gas to produce? Conserving energy rather than producing more? Importing less raw materials? Getting the same results while using less? Depending more on American know how and resources than the global economy?

I'm open to all suggestions.

whoopassonthebluegrass
01-22-2009, 08:17 PM
Well then, please enlighten me. How wrong is the scientific community? Why shouldn't we look to improving what we do? Using products that require less oil & natural gas to produce? Conserving energy rather than producing more? Importing less raw materials? Getting the same results while using less? Depending more on American know how and resources than the global economy?

I'm open to all suggestions.

It's not that they're wrong. It's that they're spinning the story - only giving the portion of data that lends credence to their apocalyptic woes.

You could take any random stat out there and easily write an article about how it's a major issue... when NOT taking into account all the other data that exists.

PSUturf
01-22-2009, 08:35 PM
I wish I could say that I am hopeful that the human race will change their lifestyles to repair some of the damage that we have done to the earth. Very few (maybe 1 or 2%) of the people that I encounter would actually change the way they live to reduce their impact on the environment. Sure everybody says they want to protect the environment but when it comes time to do something (e.g. buying locally grown food, reducing the size of their lawn, biking to the store, paying a little extra for sustainable products or made in The USA products) about it nothing happens.

RABBITMAN11
01-22-2009, 10:53 PM
Cnn they are always truthful! :hammerhead:

Rayholio
01-23-2009, 12:07 PM
Give me a break! the earth has had drastic differences in it's temperature(s) from the beginning of its existance.. Which is a lot longer than 10,000 years... some of these changes were theorised to have wiped out a large portion of life on earth. And how long have humans been emiting CO2? a hunded or two years? What about solar activity? or maybe the fact that the CO2 evidence is inconclusive... A large part of the time, CO2 levels rise AFTER the warming trend.

Yeah... you're right.. it's all your fault, and the only way to 'save the planet' is to join a cult like religion.

Yes. a religion. You have Prophets who fortell the future. You have recruitment drives to 'save' non-believers (such as this very blog) You have titheing (what do you think carbon credits are?) You have a God... the earth is what you blindly worship. You have FAITH that the worlds warming is humans fault. Faith that does not require proof.. remember.. the debate is over... I don't recall there ever being one...?

You have a mission that is never ending, requires ultimate devotion and the results of your efforts will never be measured, or considered.. it is enough to simply try.. right?

You idiots. The global 'warming' thing was invented by polititians. It's a tool of control. Welcome to the herd.

phasthound
01-23-2009, 06:51 PM
OK, so here is how Fox reported
http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,481965,00.html?sPage=fnc/scitech/naturalscience
Certainly a different slant.

Check out the link about Antarctica.

Believe it or not, climatic change is happening what ever the cause. How should we react to this?

Rayholio
01-23-2009, 07:54 PM
"how should we react to this?"

React to what? Temperature changes? The news report? The dying trees? What are we reacting to exactly, and what is a proper reaction?

Don't get me wrong..
I'm all for conserving energy..
I'm all for good stuardship of the earth.

I am NOT for drastic, and expensive actions, based on an observation.

In the 80s a 'consensus of scientists' decided we were entering an Ice age, and they were seeking funding to cover the arctic poles in black dirt.. in turn melting portions of the ice caps, and holding off our Ice age.. there's a newsweek article about this out there.

This was only about 20 years ago... We were SOOOO smart then... But in hind site.. what if we would have done as they suggested?

Maybe the best way to 'react' to this, is to start wearing shorts. The temperature is going to change NO MATTER WHAT YOU DO... It ALWAYS has... and it ALWAYS will.


one more thing.. that article is about nothing.. It's saying that in a 60 year period of observation THE MOST EFFECTED FORESTS trees died 1% faster due to a 1 degree temperature change (celcius).. Uhm... not exactly news worthy. Some years 1% more of my grass germinates.. some times 1% less... you think it really matters? How much money did they waste on this research, so that fox news could try to bolster their credibility by siding with global warming worshipers?

tlg
01-23-2009, 09:14 PM
If you take in to account that the planet is 4.5 billion years old, a 50 year study on some trees just seems a bit ridiculous. Especially when they link this dying trend to the "man made" global warming alarmist. Now I'm not saying there is no warming trend. What I am saying is that I don't believe we are responsible for it. The fact that 10 thousand years ago my entire state was covered by an ice sheet 3 miles deep tells me things had been a lot different in the past. You know it's just like us ( man ) to think he is the cause of global warming. Even worse is the concept the we ( man ) can control it in some way. Let me also say that I do agree we should do everything possible to limit harmful threats to the planet. What I don't like is some special interest activist groups pushing their agenda based on a biased studies and fear mongering. These people should realize mother nature is going to win. Our demise is going to come some day. Earthquake, flood, meteor , volcano....... take your pick.

SpreadNSpray
01-24-2009, 12:03 AM
OK, so here is how Fox reported
http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,481965,00.html?sPage=fnc/scitech/naturalscience
Certainly a different slant.

Check out the link about Antarctica.

Believe it or not, climatic change is happening what ever the cause. How should we react to this?

This one?
http://green.foxnews.com/2009/01/21/frozen-al-gore-unveiled-by-critic-in-alaska/

Kiril
01-24-2009, 12:11 AM
Doesn't take a genius to see and realize we have a significant impact on our planet.

Rayholio
01-24-2009, 12:38 AM
Doesn't take a genius to see and realize we have a significant impact on our planet.

Yes... I hear this similar argument a lot..

So... mr common sense a presume?... Please explain to me our 'significant impact'... then explain to me how you KNOW that it is part of our foot print..

Or you could look at it this way.... Doesn't take a genius to see and realize earth has a significant impact on us...

If you COULD modify behavior, and invent a way to CONTROL THE WEATHER... Where would you set the thermostat?

The question is.. Who are we to tell the earth what its climate should be? If you're SUCH a great supporter of nature, and the enviorment, why is it that your idea of a 'healthy' planet is one that is perfect for humans?? That might not be what is best for the earth..

You can't just go around making assumptions about something like this. you're talking about climate control... it's a TERRIBLE IDEA.

DUSTYCEDAR
01-24-2009, 12:50 AM
i need a hug:dancing:

Kiril
01-24-2009, 06:59 AM
Boy, all that from one sentence. I'm so happy to see how well you know me, and more importantly what I was talking about. So Rayho, what are your qualifications with respect to reviewing the science, and what science in particular have you reviewed?

Kiril
01-24-2009, 07:00 AM
Here's some research for you to look up in case you have none.
One example of a specific area of USGS research in the field Hydroclimatology (http://water.usgs.gov/nrp/currenttopics.html#hydroclimatology):

Biotic Response to Climatic Variability and Human Impacts in Arid Lands (http://water.usgs.gov/nrp/proj.bib/betancourt.html)

REPORTS PUBLISHED 1998-2007

Bowers, J. E., in press. Has climatic warming altered spring flowering date of Sonoran Desert shrubs?: Southwestern Naturalist.

Hereford, R. and Betancourt, J.L., in press, Historic geomorphology of the San Pedro River: archival and physical evidence. In: Stromberg, J. and Tellman, B., Ed., Ecology and Conservation of Desert Riparian Ecosystems: The San Pedro River Example. University of Arizona Press, Tucson

McCabe, G.J., Betancourt, J.L., Gray, S.T., Palecky, M. A., Hidalgo, H.G., in press,,Associations of multi-decadal sea-surface temperature variability with U.S. drought: Quaternary International.

McLaughlin, S.P. and Bowers, J.E., in press, Effects of Exotic Grasses on Soil Seed Banks in Southeastern Arizona Grasslands: Western North American Naturalist.

Betancourt, J.L., Schwartz, M.D., Breshears, D.D., Brewer, C.A., Frazer, G., Gross, J.E., Mazer, S.J., Reed, B.C., and Wilson, B.E., 2007, Evolving plans for a USA National Phenology Network: Eos, Transactions American Geophysical Union, v. 88, p. 211.

Gray, S.T., Graumlich, L. J., and Betancourt, J.L. 2007, Annual precipitation in the Yellowstone National Park region since AD 1173: Quaternary Research, v. 68, p. 18-27. (on-line abstract of journal article)

Holmgren, C., Norris, J., and Betancourt, J. L., 2007, Inferences about winter temperatures and summer rains from the late Quaternary record of C4 perennial grasses and C3 desert shrubs in the northern Chihuahuan Desert: Journal of Quaternary Science, v. 22, no. 2, p. 141-161. (on-line abstract or on-line journal article in pdf format, 2031 KB - published on-line in 2006 by John Wiley & Sons as a U.S. government work in the public domain)

McCabe, G., Betancourt, J.L., Hidalgo, H.G. 2007, Associations of decadal to multidecadal sea-surface temperature variability with Upper Colorado River flow: Journal of the American Water Resources Association, v. 43, no. 1, p. 183–192. doi:10.1111/j.1752-1688.2007.00015.x (on-line abstract of journal article)

Quade, J., Rech, J.A., Latorre, C.H., Betancourt, J.L., Gleeson, E., Arroyo, M.T.K., 2007, Soils at the hyperarid margin: The isotopic composition of soil carbonate from the Atacama Desert: Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, v. 71, no. 15, p. 3,772-3,795. (on-line abstract of journal article)

Bowers, J. E., 2006, Branch length mediates flower production and inflorescence architecture of Fouquieria splendens (ocotillo): Plant Ecology, v. 186, no.1, p. 87-95. (on-line abstract of journal article)

Bowers, J.E., Bean, T.M., and Turner, R.M., 2006, Two decades of change in distribution of exotic plants at the Desert Laboratory, Tucson, Arizona: Madroño v. 53, p. 252-263. (on-line abstract of journal article)

Drees, K.P., Neilson, J.W., Betancourt, J.L., Quade, J., Henderson, D.A., Pryor, B., and Maier, R.M., 2006, Bacterial community structure of soils in a hyperarid region of the Atacama Desert: Applied and Environmental Microbiology, v. 72, p. 7,902-7,908. (on-line abstract of journal article)

Gray, S.T., Betancourt, J.L., Jackson, S.T., and Eddy, R., 2006, Role of multidecadal climate variability in a range extension of pinyon pine: Ecology, v. 87, p. 1,124-1,130. (on-line abstract of journal article)

Holmgren, C., Betancourt, J.L., and Rylander, K.A., 2006, A 36,000-yr history of the Peloncillo Mountains, southeastern Arizona, USA: Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, v. 240, p. 405-422. (on-line abstract)

Keeley, J.E., Allen, C.D., Betancourt, J.L., Chong, G.W., Fotheringham, C.J. and Safford, H.D., 2006, A 21st century perspective on postfire seeding: Journal of Forestry, v. 104, no. 2, p. 103-104.

Latorre, C., Betancourt, J.L., and Arroyo, M.T.K., 2006, Vegetation and climate history of a perennial river canyon in the Rio Salado Basin (22°S) of northern Chile: Quaternary Research, v. 65, no. 3, p. 450-466. (on-line abstract of journal article)

McLaughlin, S.P. and Bowers, J.E., 2006, Plant species richness at different scales in native and exotic grasslands in southeastern Arizona: Western North American Naturalist, v. 66, p. 209-221.

Norris, J.T., Jackson, S.T., and Betancourt, J.L., 2006, Classification tree and minimum-volume ellipsoid analyses of the distribution of ponderosa pine in the western USA: Journal of Biogeography, v. 33, p. 342-360. (on-line abstract of journal article)

Parks, J.A., Dean, J.S., and Betancourt, J.L., 2006, Tree rings, drought and the Pueblo abandonment in south-central New Mexico during the 1670s, in Doyel, D.E., and Dean, J.S, eds., Environmental Change and Human Adaptation in the Ancient Southwest: Salt Lake City, University of Utah Press.

Pederson, G.T., Gray, S.T., Fagre, D.B., and Graumlich, L.J., 2006, Long-duration drought variability and impacts on ecosystem services: Earth Interactions, v. 10, p. 1-28. (on-line abstract of journal article)

Smith, F.A., and Betancourt, J.L., 2006, Predicting woodrat (Neotoma ) responses to anthropogenic warming from studies of the paleomidden record: Journal of Biogeography, v. 33, no. 12, p. 2,061-2,076. (on-line abstract of journal article)

Woodhouse, C.A., Gray, S.T., and Meko, D.M., 2006, Updated streamflow reconstructions for the upper Colorado River basin: Water Resources Research, v. 42, doi:10.1029/2005WR004455. (on-line abstract of journal article)

Betancourt, J.L., Schwartz, M.D., Breshears, D.D., Cayan, D.R., Dettinger, M.D., Inouye, D.W., Post, E., and Reed, B.C., 2005, Implementing a U.S. national phenology network: Eos Transactions American Geophysical Union, v. 86, p. 539, 542. (on-line report in pdf format, 261 KB)

Bowers, J.E., 2005, New evidence for persistent or transient seed banks in three Sonoran Desert cacti: Southwestern Naturalist, v. 50, no. 4, p. 482-487. (on-line abstract of journal article).

Bowers, J.E., 2005. El Niño and displays of spring-flowering annuals in the Mojave and Sonoran deserts: Journal of the Torrey Botanical Society, v. 132, p. 38-49. (on-line abstract or on-line journal article in pdf format)

Bowers, J.E., 2005, Influence of climatic variability on local population dynamics of a Sonoran Desert platyopuntia: Journal of Arid Environments, v. 61, p. 193-210. (on-line abstract or on-line journal article in pdf format)

Jackson, S.T., Betancourt, J.L., Lyford, M.E., and Gray, S.E., and Rylander, K.A., 2005, A 40,000-year woodrat-midden record of vegetational and biogeographic dynamics in northeastern Utah : Journal of Biogeography, v. 32, p. 1,085-1,106. (on-line abstract of journal article)

Latorre, C.L., Betancourt, J.L., Rech, J.A., Quade, J., Holmgren, C., Placzek, C.P., Vuille, M., and Rylander, K.A. 2005, Late Quaternary history of the Atacama Desert, in Smith, M., and Hesse, P., eds., 23 Degrees South: Archaeology and Environmental History of the Southern Deserts: Canberra, National Museum of Australia, p. 73-90.

Maldonado, A., Betancourt, J.L., Latorre, C. and Villagran, C., 2005, Pollen analyses from a 50,000-yr rodent midden series in the southern Atacama Desert (25º30'S): Journal of Quaternary Science, v. 20, no. 5, p. 493-507. (on-line abstract of journal article)

Reynolds, A.C., Betancourt, J.L., Quade, J., Patchett, P.J., Dean, J.S., and Stein, J., 2005, 87Sr/86Sr sourcing of ponderosa pine used in Anasazi great house construction at Chaco Canyon, New Mexico: Journal of Archaeological Science,v. 32, p.1,061-1,075. (on-line abstract of journal article)

Kiril
01-24-2009, 07:01 AM
Continued from above:


Barclay, A.D., Betancourt, J.L., and Allen, C.D., 2004, Effects of seeding with ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum) on vegetation recovery following fire in a ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) forest: International Journal of Wildland Fire, v. 3, p. 183-194. (on-line abstract)

Betancourt, J.L. 2004, Arid lands paleobiogeography: The fossil rodent midden record in the Americas, in Lomolino, M.V. and Heaney, L.R., eds., Frontiers in Biogeography: New Directions in the Geography of Nature: Sunderland, Sinauer Associates, p. 27-46.

Bowers, J.E., 2004, The best spring ever - Why El Niño makes the desert bloom: Sacramento, California, California Native Plant Society.

Bowers, J.E., 2004, Temporal variation in longevity of Opuntia engelmannii (Cactaceae) flowers: Madroño, v. 51, p. 280-285. (on-line abstract)

Bowers, J.E., 2004, Diversified germination behavior of Parkinsonia microphylla (foothill paloverde, Fabaceae): Madroño, v. 51, p. 286-291. (on-line abstract)

Bowers, J.E., 2004, Frequently asked questions about the Saguaro: Tucson, Western National Parks Association, 20 p. (on-line information)

Bowers, J.E., Turner, R.M., and Burgess, T.L., 2004, Temporal and spatial patterns in emergence and early survival of perennial plants in the Sonora Desert: Plant Ecology, v. 172, no. 1, p. 107-119. (on-line abstract)

Gray, S.T., Fastie, C.L., Jackson, S.T., and Betancourt, J.L., 2004, Tree-ring-based reconstruction of precipitation in the Bighorn Basin, Wyoming, since 1260 A.D.: Journal of Climate, v. 17, p. 3,855-3,865. (on-line abstract)

Gray, S.T., Graumlich, L.J., Betancourt, J.L., and Pederson, G.T., 2004, A tree-ring based reconstruction of the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation since 1567 A.D.: Geophysical Research Letters, v. 31, doi:10.1029/2004GL019932. (on-line abstract or on-line publication in pdf format)

Gray, S.T., Jackson, S.T., and Betancourt, J.L., 2004, Tree-ring based reconstructions of interannual to decadal scale precipitation variability for northeastern Utah since 1226 A.D.: Journal of the American Water Resources Association, v. 40, p. 947-960. (on-line abstract or on journal article in pdf format)

Maier, R.M., Drees, K.P., Neilson, J.W., Henderson, D.A., Quade, J., and Betancourt, J.L., 2004, Microbial life in the Atacama Desert (letter): Science, v. 306, p. 1,289.

McCabe, G.J., Palecki, M.A., and Betancourt, J.L., 2004, Pacific and Atlantic Ocean influences on multidecadal drought frequency in the United States: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA, v. 101, p. 4,136-4,141. (on-line abstract or lon-line publication in pdf format)

Betancourt, J. L., 2003, Review of "Relation of 'Bonito' paleo-channels and base-level variations to Anasazi occupation, Chaco Canyon, New Mexico" by E.R. Force and others: Progress in Physical Geography , v. 27, no. 2, p. 308-309. (on-line book review)

Betancourt, J.L., Grissino-Mayer, H.D., Salzer, M.W., and Swetnam, T.W., 2003, Reply to Genty and Baker: Quaternary Research, v. 59, p. 479.

Gray, S.T., Betancourt, J.L., Fastie, C.L., and Jackson, S.T., 2003, Patterns and sources of multidecadal oscillations in drought-sensitive tree-ring records from the central and southern Rocky Mountains: Geophysical Research Letters, v. 30, no. 6, p. 49-1 - 49-4. (on-line abstract)

Hofreiter, M., Betancourt, J.L., Sbriller, A. P., Markgraf, V., and McDonald, H.G., 2003, Phylogeny, diet and habitat of an extinct ground sloth from Cuchillo Curá, Neuquén Province, southwest Argentina: Quaternary Research, v. 59, p. 364-378. (on-line abstract)

Holmgren, C., Peñalba, M. C., Rylander, K. A., and Betancourt, J. L., 2003, A 16,000 14C yr B.P. packrat midden series from the U.S.A-Mexico Borderlands: Quaternary Research, v. 60, p. 319-329. (on-line abstract or on-line paper in pdf format)

Latorre, C., Betancourt, J.L., Rylander, K.A., Quade, J., and Matthei, O., 2003, A 13.5-kyr vegetation history from the arid prepuna of northern Chile (22-23oS): Paleogeography, Paleoclimatology, Paleoecology, v. 194, p. 223-246. (on-line abstract)


Lyford, M.E., Jackson, S.T., Betancourt, J.L., and Gray, S., 2003, Influence of landscape structure and climate variability in a late Holocene natural invasion: Ecological Monographs, v. 73, p. 567–583. (on-line abstract)

Milne, B. T., Moore, D. I., Betancourt, J. L., Parks, J. A., Swetnam, T. W., Parmenter, R. R., and Pockman, W. T. 2003, Multidecadal drought cycles in south-central New Mexico: Patterns and consequences in Greenland, D., ed., Climate variability and ecosystem response at Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) sites: Oxford University Press, p. 286-307.

Rech, J.A., Pigati, J.S., Quade, J., and Betancourt, J.L, 2003, Re-evaluation of mid-Holocene wetland deposits at Quebrada Puripica, northern Chile: Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, v. 194, p. 207-222. (on-line abstract)

Smith, F.A., and Betancourt, J.L., 2003, The effect of Holocene temperature fluctuations on the evolution and ecology of Neotoma (woodrats) in Idaho and northwestern Utah: Quaternary Research, v. 59, no. 2, p. 160-171. (on-line abstract)

Turner, R.M., Webb, R.H., Bowers, J.E., and Hastings, J.R., 2003, The Changing Mile Revisited: Tucson, University of Arizona Press, 334 p. (on-line information)

Betancourt, J.L., 2002, Book review: Interhemispheric Climatic Linkages, edited by Vera Markgraf: Arctic & Alpine Research, v. 34, p. 226-227.

Betancourt, J.L, Grissino-Mayer, Salzer, M.W., and Swetnam, T.W., 2002, A test of "annual resolution" in stalagmites using tree rings: Quarternary Research, v. 58, p. 197-199. (on-line abstract)

Betancourt, J.L., and Saavedra, B., 2002, Nuevo método paleoecológico para el estudio de zonas áridas en Sudamérica: paleomadrigueras de roedores (New paleoecological method for quaternary studies in arid lands of South America: Rodent middens): Revista Chilena de Historia Natural, v. 75, p. 527-546. (on-line abstract in Spanish; on-line abstract in English)

Bowers, J.E., 2002, Regeneration of triangle-leaf bursage (Ambrosia deltoidea: Asteraceae): Germination behavior and between-year seed bank: Southwestern Naturalist, v. 47, p. 449-453.

Bowers, J.E., 2002, Flowering patterns and reproductive ecology of Mammillaria grahamii (Cactaceae), a common, small cactus in the Sonoran Desert: Madroño, v. 49, p. 201-206. (on-line abstract)

Bowers, J.E., and Turner, R.M., 2002, The influence of climatic variability on local population dynamics of Cercidium microphyllum (foothill paloverde): Oecologia, v. 130, p. 105-113. (on-line abstract)

Jackson, S.T., Lyford, M.E., and Betancourt, J.L., 2002, A 4000-year record of woodland vegetation from Wind River Canyon, central Wyoming: Western North American Naturalist, v. 62, p. 405-413. (on-line pdf file)

Kuch, M., Rohland, N., Betancourt, J.L., LaTorre, C., Steppans, S., and Poinar, H.N., 2002, Molecular analysis of a 12,000-year-old rodent midden from the Atacama Desert, Chile: Molecular Ecology, v. 11, p. 913-924. (on-line abstract)

Latorre, C.L., Betancourt, J.L., Rylander, K.A., and Quade, J.A., 2002, Vegetation invasions into Absolute Desert: A 45,000-year rodent midden record from the Calama-Salar de Atacama Basins, Chile: Geological Society of America Bulletin, v. 114, p. 349-366. (on-line abstract)

Lyford, M.E., Betancourt, J.L, and Jackson, S.T., 2002, Holocene vegetation and climate history of the northern Bighorn Basin, southern Montana, USA: Quarternary Research, v. 58, p. 171-181. (on-line abstract)
.
Pearson, S. and Betancourt, J.L. 2002, Understanding arid environments using fossil rodent middens: Journal of Arid Environments, v. 50, p. 499-511. (on-line abstract)

Pedicino, L., Leavitt, S. W., Betancourt, J. L., and Van de Water, P. K., 2002, Historical variations in d13C leaf of herbarium specimens in the southwestern U.S.: Western North American Naturalist, v. 62, p. 348-359. (on-line pdf file)

Rech, J.A., Quade, J. and Betancourt, J.L., 2002, Late Quaternary paleohydrology of the central Atacama Desert (22-24°S), Chile: Geological Society of America Bulletin, v. 114, p. 334-348. (on-line abstract)

Terwilliger, V.J., Betancourt, J.L., Leavitt, S.W., and Van de Water, P.K., 2002, Leaf cellulose dD and d18O trends with elevation and climate in semi-arid species: Geochimica et Coscomochima Acta, v. 66, p. 3,887-3,900. (on-line abstract)

Van de Water, P.K., Leavitt, S.W., and Betancourt, J.L., 2002, Leaf d13C variability with elevation, slope aspect, and precipitation in the southwest United States, Oecologia 132: 332-343. (on-line abstract)

Betancourt, J.L., Rylander, K.A., Penalba, C., and McVickar, J.L., 2001, Late quaternary vegetation history of Rough Canyon, south-central New Mexico, U.S.A.: Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, and Palaeoecology, v. 165, p. 71-95. (on-line abstract)

Bowers, J.E., and Pierson, E.A., 2001, Implications of seed size for seedling survival in Carnegiea gigantea and Ferocactus wislizeni (Cactaceae): Southwestern Naturalist, v. 46, no. 3, p. 272-281.

Bowers, J.E., and Turner, R.M., 2001, Dieback and episodic mortality of Cercidium microphyllum (foothill paloverde), a dominant Sonoran Desert tree: Journal of the Torrey Botanical Society, v. 128, p. 128-140.

English, N.B., Betancourt, J.L., Dean, J.S., and Quade, J., 2001, Strontium isotopes reveal distant sources of architectural timber in Chaco Canyon, New Mexico: Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, v. 98, p. 11,891-11,896. (on-line abstract)

Holmgren, C.A., Betancourt, J.L., Aasen Rylander, K., Roque, J., Tovar, O., Zeballos, H., Linares, E., and Quade, J., 2001, Holocene vegetation history from fossil rodent middens near Arequipa, Peru: Quaternary Research, v. 56, p. 242-251. (on-line abstract)

Hunter, K.L., Betancourt, J.L., Riddle, B.R., Van Devender, T.R., Cole, K.L., and Spaulding, W.G., 2001, Ploidy race distributions since the Last Glacial Minimum in the North American desert shrub, Larrea tridentata: Global Ecology & Biogeography, v. 10, no. 5, p. 521-533. (on-line abstract)

McLaughlin, S.P., Geiger, E.L., and Bowers, J.E., 2001, A flora of the Appleton-Whittell Research Ranch, northeastern Santa Cruz County, Arizona: Journal of the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science, v. 33, p. 113-131.

Placzek, C., Quade, J., and Betancourt, J.L., 2001, Holocene lake-level fluctuations of Lake Aricota, southern Peru: Quaternary Research, v. 56, p. 181-190. (on-line abstract)

Quade, J. Rech, J., Betancourt, J.L., and Latorre, C., 2001, Mid-Holocene climate in the south-central Andes: Humid or Dry?: Science, v. 292, p. 2391a. (on-line reply)

Anderson, R.S., Betancourt, J.L., Mead J.I., Hevly R.H., Adam D.P., 2000, Mid- and late Wisconsin paleobotanic and paleoclimatic records from the southern Colorado Plateau, USA: Paelogeography, Paleoclimatology, and Palecology 155, p. 31-57. (on-line abstract)

Betancourt, J.L., 2000, The Amazon reveals its secrets - Partly: Science, v. 290, p. 2274-2275.

Betancourt, J.L., Latorre, C., Rech, J.A., Quade, J., and Rylander, K.A., 2000, A 22,000-year record of monsoonal precipitation from northern Chile's Atacama Desert: Science, v. 289, p. 1,542-1,546. (on-line abstract)

Bowers, J.E., 2000, Does Ferocactus wislizeni (Cactaceae) have a between-year seed bank?: Journal of Arid Environments, v. 45, p. 197-205. (on-line abstract)

Brown, T.J., and Betancourt, J.L., 2000, Effect of climate variability and forecasting on fuel treatment schedules in the western U.S.: Proceedings of the U.S. Department of Agriculture and Department of Interior Fire Sciences Workshop, v. 11, Boise, ID, June 15-17, 1999, University of Idaho and the International Association of Wildland Fire, p. 167-172.

McLaughlin, S.P., and Bowers, J.E., 1999, Diversity and affinities of the flora of the Sonoran Floristic Province, in Robichaux, R., ed., Ecology and Conservation of the Sonoran Desert Flora: Tucson, University of Arizona Press, p. 12-35.

Pendall, E., Betancourt, J.L., and Leavitt, S.W., 1999, Paleoclimatic significance of delta D and delta 13C in pinyon pine needles from packrat middens spanning ther last 40,000 years: Paleogeography, Paleoclimatology, and Paleoecology, v. 147, p. 53-72. (on-line abstract)

Swetnam, T.W., Allen, C.D., and Betancourt, J.L., 1999, Applied Historical Ecology: using the past to manage for the future: Ecological Applications 64, p 1189-1206. (on-line abstract)

White, P.S., Harrod, J., Romme, W.H., and Betancourt, J.L., 1999. Role of disturbance and temproal dynamics, in Johnson, N.C., Malk, A.J., Sexton, W.T., and Szaro R., eds, Ecological Stewardship: A Common Reference for Ecosystem Management: Oxford, Elsevier Science Ltd., p. 281-312.

Allen, C.D., Betancourt, J.L., and Swetnam, T.W., 1998, Landscape Changes in the Southwestern United States: Techniques, Long-Term Datasets, and Trends, in Sisk, T. Sisk and others, eds., Land Use History of North America: Providing a Context for Understanding Environmental Change: U.S. Geological Survey Biological Science Report BSR-1998-003, p. 71-84. (on-line report)

Connin, S.L. Betancourt, J.L. and Quade, J., 1998, Late Pleistocene C4 plant dominance and summer rainfall in the southwestern U.S.A. from isotopic study of herbivore teeth, Quaternary Research, v. 50, no. 2, p. 179-193. (on-line abstract)

Pierson, E.A. and Turner, R.M., 1998, Demographic trends from an 85-year study of saguaro (Carnegiea gigantea) at the Desert Laboratory: Ecology, v. 79, p. 2676-2693.

Shanley, J.B., Pendall, E., Kendall, C., Stevens, L.R., Michel, R.L., Phillips, P.J., Forester, R.M., Naftz, D.L., Liu, B., Stern, L., Wolfe, B.B., Chamberlain, C.P., Leavitt, S.W., Heaton, T.H.E., Mayer, B., Cecil, L.D., Lyons, W.B., Katz, B.G., Betancourt, J.L., McKnight, D.M., Blum, J.D., Edwards, T.W.D., House, H.R., Ito, E., Aravena, R.O., and Whelan, J.F., 1998, Chapter 22, Isotopes as indicators of environmental change, in Kendall, C. and McDonnell, J.J., eds., Isotope Tracers in Catchment Hydrology: Elsevier, Amsterdam, p. 761-816. (on-line excerpt)

Smith, F.A. and J..L. Betancourt. 1998. Response of bushy-tailed woodrats (Neotoma cinerea) to late Quaternary climatic change in the Colorado Plateau: Quaternary Research, v. 50, no. 1, p. 1-11. (on-line abstract)

Swetnam, T.R., and Betancourt, J.L., 1998, Mesoscale disturbance and ecological response to decadal climate variability in the American Southwest: Journal of Climate, v. 11, p. 3128-3147. (on-line abstract)

Kiril
01-24-2009, 07:03 AM
And another area: Hydro-climatic Processes and Hazards (http://water.usgs.gov/nrp/proj.bib/mccabe.html)

REPORTS PUBLISHED 2001-2007

McCabe, G.J., Palecki, M.A., and Betancourt, J.L., in press, Ocean influenences on multi-decadal drought frequency in the conterminous United States: Proceedings of the Pacific Climate, (PACLIM) workshop.

McCabe, G., Betancourt, J.L., Hidalgo, H.G. 2007, Associations of decadal to multidecadal sea-surface temperature variability with Upper Colorado River flow: Journal of the American Water Resources Association, v. 43, no. 1, p. 183–192. doi:10.1111/j.1752-1688.2007.00015.x (on-line abstract of journal article)

McCabe, G.J., Clark, M.P. and Hay, L.E., 2007,. Rain-on-snow events in the western United States: Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, v. 88, no. 3, p. 319-328. (on-line abstract or on-line article, in pdf format, 3.41 MB, published by the American Meteorological Society with open access)

McCabe, G.J., and Hay, L.E., 2006. Hydroclimatic aspects of the Upper Klamath River Basin: Proceedings of the 3rd Federal Hydrologic Modeling Conference, Reno, Nevada, April 2-6, 2006, published as a CD-ROM.

Clark, M.P., Slater, A.G., Barrett, A.P., Hay, L.E., McCabe, G.J., Rajagopalan, B., and Leavesley, G.H., 2006, Assimilation of snow covered area information into hydrologic and land-surface models: Advances in Water Resouces, v. 29, p. 1209-1221. (on-line abstract of journal article)

Dyurgerov, M., and McCabe, G.J., 2006. Associations between accelerated glacier mass wastage and increased summer temperature: Arctic, Antarctic, and Alpine Research. v. 38, no. 2, p. 190-197. (on-line abstract of journal article)

McCabe, G.J., and Clark, M.P., 2006, Shifting covariability of North American summer monsoon precipitation with antecedent winter precipitation: International Journal of Climatology, v. 26, no. 8, p. 991-999. (on-line abstract of journal article)

McCabe, G.J., and Palaecki, M.A., 2006, Multidecadal climate variability of global lands and oceans: International Journal of Climatology, v. 26, no. 7, p. 849-865. (on-line abstract of journal article)

Battaglin, W., Hay, L., McCabe, G., Nanjappa, P., and Gallant, A.L., 2005, Climate patterns as predictors of amphibian species richness and indicators of potential stress: Alytes, v., 22, no. 3-4, p. 145-167.

Legates, D.R., Lins, H.F., and McCabe, G.J., 2005, Comments on "Evidence for global runoff increase related to climate warming" by Labat and others: Advances in Water Resouces, v 28, no. 12, p. 1310-1315. (on-line abstract)

Legates, D.R., and McCabe, G.J., 2005, A re-evaluation of the average annual global water balance: Physical Geography, v. 26, p. 467-479. (on-line abstract of journal article)

McCabe, G.J., and Clark, M.P., 2005, Trends and variability in snowmelt runoff in the western United States: Journal of Hydrometeorology, v. 6, no. 4, p. 476-482. (on-line abstract of journal article)

Webb, R.H., Hereford, Richard, and McCabe, G.J., 2005, Climatic fluctuations, drought, and flow in the Colorado River, in Gloss, S.P., Lovich, J.E., and Melis, T.S., eds., The State of the Colorado River Ecosystem in Grand Canyon: U.S. Geological Survey Circular 1282, p. 59-69. (on-line article in pdf format)

McCabe, G.J., and Bunnell, J., 2004. Precipitation and the Occurrence of Lyme Disease in the Northeastern United States: Vector Borne and Zoonotic Diseases, v. 4, no. 2, p.143-148. (on-line abstract of journal article)

McCabe, G.J., Palecki, M.A., and Betancourt, J.L., 2004, Pacific and Atlantic Ocean influences on multidecadal drought frequency in the United States: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA, v. 101, p. 4,136-4,141. (on-line abstract or on-line publication in pdf format)

Webb, R.H., McCabe, G.J., Hereford, R., and Wilkowske, C., 2004, Climatic fluctuations, drought, and flow on the Colorado River: U.S. Geological Survey Fact Sheet 3062-04. (on-line fact sheet)

Cayan, D., Dettinger, M., Redmond, K., McCabe, G., Knowles, N., and Peterson, D., 2003, The transboundary setting of California's water and hydropower systems - linkages between the Sierra Nevada, Columbia River, and Colorado River Hydroclimates, in Diaz, H.F., and Woodhouse, B., eds., Climate and Water - Transboundary Challenges in the Americas: Kluwer Academic Publishers, Advances in Global Change Research series, v. 16.

Clark, M.P., Hay, L.E., McCabe, G.J., Leavesley, G.H., Serreze, M.C., and Wilby, R.L., 2003, The use of weather and climate information in forecasting water supply in the western United States, in Lewis, W.M., ed., Water and Climate in the Western United States: University of Colorado Press, Boulder, Colorado, p. 69-92.

McCabe, G.J., and Wolock, D.M., 2003, Is streamflow increasing in the conterminous United States?: Proceedings of the 19th Annual Pacific Climate (PACLIM) Workshop, Pacific Grove, California, March 2002, p. 93-98.

Meier, M., Dyurgerov, M., and McCabe, G.J., 2003, The health of glaciers - recent changes in glacier regime: Climatic Change: v. 59, p. 123-135. (on-line abstract)

Hay, L.E., and McCabe, G.J., 2002, Spatial variability in water-balance model performance in the conterminous United States: Journal of the American Water Resources Association, v. 38, no. 3, p. 847-860. (on-line abstract)

Markstrom, S.L., McCabe, G., and David, O., 2002, Web-based distribution of geo-ccientific models: Computers & Geosciences, v. 28, p. 577-581. (on-line abstract)

McCabe, G.J., and Dettinger, M.D., 2002, Primary modes and predictability of year-to-year snowpack variations in the western United States from teleconnections with Pacific Ocean climate: Journal of Hydrometeorology, v. 3, p. 13-25. (on-line abstract or on-line pdf file)

McCabe, G.J., and Dettinger, M.D., 2002, Primary modes and predictability of year-to-year snowpack variations in the western United States from teleconnections with Pacific Ocean climate: Proceedings of the 18th Pacific Climate (PACLIM) Workshop, Pacific Grove, Calif., March 2001.

McCabe, G.J., and Dettinger, M.D., 2002, Summary: Primary modes and predictability of year-to-year snowpack variations in the western United States from teleconnections with Pacific Ocean climate: Bulletin of the American Meterological Society, p. 176.

McCabe G.J., and Muller R.A., 2002, Effects of ENSO on weather-type frequencies and properties at New Orleans, Louisiana, USA: Climate Research, v. 20, no. 2, p. 95-105. (on-line abstract)

McCabe, G.J., and Wolock, D.M., 2002, Trends and effects of increased termperature on moisture conditions in the conterminous United States: Climate Research, v. 20, no. 1, p. 19-29. (on-line abstract)

McCabe, G.J., and Wolock, D.M., 2002, A step increase in streamflow in the conterminous United States: Geophysical Research Letters, v. 29, no. 24, p. 2185. (on-line abstract)

Clark, M.P., Serreze, M.C., McCabe, G.J., 2001, Historical effects of El Nino and La Nina events on the seasonal evolution of the montane snowpack in the Columbia and Colorado River Basins: Water Resources Research, v. 37, p. 741-758. (on-line abstract)

Dettinger, M.D., Battisti, D.S., Garreaud, McCabe, G.J., and Bitz, C.M., 2001, Interhemispheric effects of interannual and decadal ENSO-like climate variations in the Americas, in Markgraf, V., ed., Present and past inter-hemispheric climate lnkages in the Americas and their societal effects: Cambridge University Press, p. 1-16.

McCabe, G.J., Clark, M.P., and Serreze, M.C., 2001, Trends in northern hemisphere surface cyclone frequency and intensity: Journal of Climate, v. 14, no. 12, p. 2763-2768. (on-line abstract)

Kiril
01-24-2009, 07:04 AM
And another: Characterization of Biotic and Biogeochemical Interactions at Environmental Interfaces (http://water.usgs.gov/nrp/proj.bib/striegl.html)

REPORTS PUBLISHED 1998-2007

Cole, J.J., Prairie, Y.T., Caraco, N.F., McDowell, W.H., Tranvik, L.J., Striegl, R.G., Duarte, C.M., Kortelainen, P., Downing, J.A., Middleburg, J.J., and Melack, J., in press, Plumbing the global carbon cycle: Integrating inland waters into the terrestrial carbon budget: Ecosystems. DOI: 10.1007/s10021-006-9013-8.

Dornblaser, M.M., and Striegl R.G., 2007, Nutrient (N, P) loads and yields at multiple scales and subbasin types in the Yukon River basin, Alaska: Journal of Geophysical Research, doi:10.1029/2006JG000366. (on-line abstract or on-line journal article in pdf format, 564 kb, published in 2007 by American Geophysical Union, not subject to U.S. copyright)

Raymond, P. A., McClelland, J.W.,. Holmes, R.M., Zhulidov, A.V., Mull, K., Peterson, B.J., Striegl, R.G.,. Aiken, G.R., and Gurtovaya, T.Y., 2007, Flux and age of dissolved organic carbon exported to the Arctic Ocean: A carbon isotopic study of the five largest arctic rivers: Global Biogeochemical Cycles, v. 21, GB4011, doi:10.1029/2007GB002934. (on-line abstract of journal article)

Striegl, R.G., Dornblaser, M.M., Aiken, G.R., Wickland, K.P., and Raymond, P.A., 2007, Carbon export and cycling by the Yukon, Tanana, and Porcupine Rivers, Alaska, 2001-2005, Water Resources Research v. 43, W02411, doi:10.1029/2006WR005201 (on-line abstract or on-line journal article in pdf format, 564 kb, published 2007 by American Geophysical Union, not subject to U.S. copyright)

Rao, B.A., Anderson, T.A., Orris, G.J., Rajagopalan, S., Sandvig, R.M., Scanlon, B.R., Stonestrom, D.A., Walvoord, M.A., and Jackson, W.A., 2007, Widespread natural perchlorate in unsaturated zones of the southwest US: Environmental Science & Technology, v. 41, p. 4522-4528. (on-line abstract of journal article)

Walvoord, M.A., and Striegl, R.G., 2007, Increased groundwater to stream discharge from permafrost thawing in the Yukon River basin: Potential impacts on lateral export of carbon and nitrogen: Geophysical Research Letters, v. 34, L12402, doi:10.1029/2007GL030216. (on-line abstract or on-line journal article in pdf format, 457 KB, published 2007 by American Geophysical Union, not subject to U.S. copyright)

Dornblaser, Mark M. and D.R. Halm, eds., 2006, Water and sediment quality of the Yukon River and its tributaries, from Eagle to St. Marys, Alaska, 2002-2003: U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2006-1228, 201 p., Boulder, CO. (on-line abstract or on line report in pdf format, 18 MB)

Downing, J.A., Prairie, Y.T., Cole, J.J., Duarte, C.M., Tranvik, L.J., Striegl, R.G., McDowell, W.H., Kortelainen, P., Caraco, N.F., Melack, J.M., and Middelburg, J.J., 2006, The global abundance and size distribution of lakes, ponds, and impoundments: Limnology and Oceanography, v. 51, no. 5, p. 2388-2397. (on-line abstract of journal article)

King, S.A., Behnke, S., Slack, K., Krabbenhoft, D.P., Nordstrom, D.K., Burr, M.D. and Striegl, R.G., 2006, Mercury in water and biomass of microbial communities in hot springs of Yellowstone National Park, USA: Applied Geochemistry, v. 21, p.1,868-1,879. (on-line abstract of journal article)

Kwicklis, E., Wolfsberg, A., Stauffer, P., Walvoord, M., and Sully, M., 2006, Multiphase, multicomponent parameter estimation for liquid and vapor fluxes in deep arid systems using hydrologic data and natural environmental tracers: Vadose Zone Journal, v. 5, p. 934-950, doi:10.2136/vzj2006.0021. (on-line abstract of journal article)

Striegl, R.G. and Dornblaser, M.M.,, 2006, Dissolved gases and dissolved inorganic carbon, in Schuster, P.F., ed., 2006, Water and sediment quality in the Yukon River Basin, Alaska, during water year 2004: U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2006-1258, chapt. 6, p. 45-46. (on-line chapter in pdf format)

Wickland, K.P., Striegl, R.G., Neff, J.C., and Sachs, T., 2006, Effects of permafrost melting on CO2 and CH4 exchange of a poorly drained black spruce lowland: Journal of Geophysical Research, v. 111, G02011, doi:10.1029/2005JG000099. (on-line abstract of journal article)

Striegl, R.G., Aiken, G.R., Dornblaser, M.M., Raymond, P.A., and Wickland, K.P., 2005, A decrease in discharge-normalized DOC export by the Yukon River during summer through autumn: Geophysical Research Letters, v. 32, L21413, doi:10.1029/2005GL024413. (on-line abstract of journal article)

Striegl, R.G. and Dornblaser, M.M.,, 2005, Dissolved gases and dissolved inorganic carbon, in Schuster, P.F., ed., Water and sediment quality in the Yukon River Basin, Alaska, during water year 2002: U.S. Geological Survey Report 2005-1199, p. 56-57.

Striegl, R.G. and Dornblaser, M.M.,, 2005, Dissolved gases and dissolved inorganic carbon, in Schuster, P.F., ed., Water and sediment quality in the Yukon River Basin, Alaska, during water year 2003: U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2005-1397, p. 49-50. (on-line chapter in pdf format)

Walvoord, M.A., Striegl, R.G., Prudic, D.E., and Stonestrom, D.A., 2005, CO2 dynamics in the Amargosa Desert: Fluxes and isotopic speciation in a deep unsaturated zone: Water Resources Research, v. 41, no 2. (on-line abstract of journal article)

Phillips, F.M., Walvoord, M.A., and Small, E.E., 2004, Effects of environmental change on groundwater recharge in the desert southwest, in Hogan, J.F, Phillips, F.M, and Scanlon, B.R., eds., Groundwater recharge in a desert environment---The southwestern United States: American Geophysical Union Water Science and Applications Series, v. 9, p. 273-294.

Stonestrom, D.A., Abraham, J.D., Andraski, B.J., Baker, R.J., Mayers, C.J., Michel, R.L., Prudic, D.E., Striegl, R.G., and Walvoord, M.A., 2004, Monitoring radionuclide contamination in the unsaturated zone - lessons learned at the Amargosa Desert Research Site, Nye County, Nevada, Workshop on Long-term Performance Monitoring of Metals and Radionuclides in the Subsurface, Rston, VA, April 21-22, 2004: Tallahassee, Florida State University. (on-line paper in pdf format)

Walvoord, M.A., Phillips, F.M., Stonestrom, D.A., Evans, R.D., Hartsough, P.C., Newman, B.D., and Striegl, R.G., 2004, Response to comment on "A reservoir of nitrate beneath desert soils": Science, v. 304, p. 51c. (on-line response)

Walvoord, M.A., and Scanlon, B.R., 2004, Hydrologic processes in deep vadose zones in interdrainage arid environments, in Hogan, J.F, Phillips, F.M, and Scanlon, B.R., eds., Groundwater recharge in a desert environment---The southwestern United States: American Geophysical Union Water Science and Applications Series, v. 9, p. 15-28.

Walvoord, M.A., and Stonestrom, D.A., 2004, Enhanced gas-phase transport in a deep unsaturated zone, Amargosa Desert (U.S.A), Proceedings of the International Conference on Finite-Element Models -- MODFLOW and More, Karlovy Vary, Czech Republic, September 13-16, 2004: Fontainebleau, France, International Association of Hydrologic Sciences (published on CD-ROM).

Walvoord, M.A., Stonestrom, D.A., Andraski, B.J., and Striegl, R.G., 2004, Constraining the inferred paleohydrologic evolution of a deep unsaturated zone in the Amargosa Desert: Vadose Zone Journal, v. 3, p. 502-512. (on-line abstract)

Clow, D.W., Sickman, J.O., Striegl, R.G., Krabbenhoft, D.P., Elliott, J.G., Dornblaser, M., Roth, D.A., and Campbell, D.H., 2003, Changes in the chemistry of lakes and precipitation in high-elevation national parks in the western United States, 1985 -1999: Water Resources Research, v. 39, no. 6, (on-line abstract)

Leland, H.V., 2003, The influence of water depth and flow regime on phytoplankton bio-mass and community structure in a shallow, lowland river: Hydrobiologia, v. 506, n. 1, p. 247-255. (on-line abstract)

Striegl, R.G., and Dornblaser, M.M., 2003, Dissolved gases and dissolved inorganic carbon, in Schuster, P.F., ed., Water and sediment quality in the Yukon River Basin, Alaska, during water year 2001: U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 03-427, p. 41-42.

Walvoord,M.A., Phillips, F.M., Stonestrom, D.A., Evans, R.D., Hartsough, P.C., Newman, B.D., and Striegl, R.G., 2003, A reservoir of nitrate beneath desert soils: Science, v. 302, no. 5647, p. 1021-1024. (on-line abstract or full text)

Clow, D.W., Striegl, R.G., Nanus, L., Mast, M.A., Campbell, D.H., and Krabbenhoft, D.P, 2002, Chemistry of selected high-elevation lakes in seven National Parks in the western United States: Water, Air, and Soil Pollution - Focus, v. 2, p. 139-164. (on-line abstract)

Krabbenhoft, D.P, Olson, M.L., Dewild, J.F., Clow, D.W., Striegl, R.G., Dornblaser, M.M., and VanMetre, P., 2002, Mercury loading and methylmercury production and cycling in high-altitude lakes from the western United States: Water, Air, and Soil Pollution, - Focus, v. 2, p. 233-249. (on-line abstract)

Leland, H.V., Brown, L.R., Mueller, D.K., 2001, Distribution of algae in the San Joaquin River, California, in relation to nutrient supply, salinity and other environmental factors: Freshwater Biology, v. 46, no. 9, p. 1139-1167. (on-line abstract)

Striegl, R.G., Kortelainen, P., Chanton, J.P., Wickland, K.P., Bugna, G.C., and Rantakari, M., 2001, Carbon dioxide partial pressure and 13C content of north temperate and boreal lakes at spring ice melt: Limnology and Oceanography, v. 46, no. 4, p. 941-945. (on-line abstract)

Striegl, R.G., and Wickland, K.P., 2001, Soil Respiration and Photosynthetic Uptake of Carbon Dioxide by Ground-Cover Plants in Four Ages of Jack Pine Forest: Canadian Journal for Forest Research, v. 31, p. 1540 - 1550. (on-line abstract)

Wickland, K.P., Striegl, R.G., Mast, M.A., and Clow, D.W., 2001, Carbon gas exchange at a southern Rocky Mountain wetland, 1996-1998: Global Biogeochemical Cycles, v. 15, no. 2, p. 321-335. (on-line abstract)

Clow, D. W., Campbell, D. H., Mast, M.A., Striegl, R.G., Wickland, K.P., and Ingersoll, G.P., 2000, Loch Vale, Colorado - A Water, Energy, and Biogeochemical Budgets Program site: U.S. Geological Survey Fact Sheet 164-99. (on-line fact sheet)

Hutchinson, G.L., Livingston, G.P., Healy, R.W., and Striegl, R.G., 2000, Chamber measurement of surface-atmosphere trace gas exchange: Numerical evaluation of dependence on soil interfacial layer, and source/sink products: Journal of Geophysical Research, v. 105, no. D7, p. 8865-8875. (on-line abstract)

Leland, H.V., and Porter, S.D., 2000, Distribution of benthic algae in the upper Illinois River basin in relation to geology and landuse: Freshwater Biology, v. 44, p. 279-301. (on-line abstract)

Rosenberry, D.O., Striegl, R.G., and Hudson, D.L., 2000, Plants as indicators of focused ground water discharge to a northern Minnesota Lake: Ground Water, v. 38, no. 2, p. 296-303. (on-line abstract)

Striegl, R.G., Schindler, J.E., Wickland, K.P., Hudson, D.C., and Knight, G., 2000, Patterns of carbon dioxide and methane saturation in 34 Minnesota and Wisconsin lakes: Verhandlungen Internationale Vereinigung Limnologie, v. 27., p. 1424-1427.

Anderson, D.E., Striegl, R.G., Stannard, D.I., Michmerhuizen, C.M., McConnaughey, T.A., and LaBaugh, J.W., 1999, Estimating lake atmosphere CO2 exchange: Limnology and Oceanography, v. 44, n. 4, p. 988-1001. (on-line abstract)

Healy, R.W., Striegl, R.G., Michel, R.L., Prudic, D.E., and Andraski, B.J., 1999, Tritium in water vapor in the shallow unsaturated zone at the Amargosa Desert Research Site, in Morganwalp, D.W., and Buxton, H.T., eds., U.S. Geological Survey Toxic Substances Hydrology Program--Proceedings of the Technical Meeting, Charleston, South Carolina, March 8-12, 1999, Subsurface Contamination from Point Sources: U.S. Geological Survey Water-Resources Investigations Report 99-4018C, v. 3., p. 485-490. (on-line abstract)

Prudic, D.E., Striegl, R.G., Healy, R.W., Michel, R.L., and Haas, H., 1999, Tritium and 14C concentrations in borehole UZB-2 at the Amargosa Desert Research Site, 1994-1998, in Morganwalp, D.W., and Buxton, H.T., eds., U.S. Geological Survey Toxic Substances Hydrology Program--Proceedings of the Technical Meeting, Charleston, South Carolina, March 8-12, 1999, Subsurface Contamination from Point Sources: U.S. Geological Survey Water-Resources Investigations Report 99-4018C, v. 3., p. p. 475-484. (on-line abstract)

Riggs, A.C., Striegl, R.G., and Maestas, F.B., 1999, Soil respiration at the Amargosa Desert Research Site, in Morganwalp, D.W., and Buxton, H.T., eds., U.S. Geological Survey Toxic Substances Hydrology Program--Proceedings of the Technical Meeting, Charleston, South Carolina, March 8-12, 1999, Subsurface Contamination from Point Sources: U.S. Geological Survey Water-Resources Investigations Report 99-4018C, v. 3., p. 491-497. (on-line abstract)

Wickland, K.P., Striegl, R.G., Schmidt, S.K., and Mast, M.A., 1999, Methane flux in subalpine wetland and unsaturated soils in the southern Rocky Mountains: Global Biogeochemical Cycles, v. 13, p. 101-113. (on-line abstract)

Leland, H.V., and Berkas, W.R., 1998, Temporal variation in plankton assemblages and physicochemistry of Devils Lake, North Dakota: Hydrobiologia, v. 377, p. 57-71. (abstract on-line)

Leland, H.V. and Fend, S.V., 1998, Benthic invertebrate distributions in the San Joaquin River, California, in relation to physical and chemical factors: Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, v. 55, p. 1051-1067. (abstract on-line)

Mast, M.A., Wickland, K.P., Striegl, R.G., and Clow, D.C., 1998, Winter fluxes of CO2 and CH4 from subalpine soils in Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado: Global Biogeochemical Cycles, v. 12, p. 607-620.

Striegl, R.G., Healy, R.W., Michel., R.L., and Prudic, D.E., 1998, Tritium in Unsaturated zone gases and air at the Amazon Desert Research Site, and in spring and river water, near Beatty, Nevada, May 1997: U.S. Geological Survey Open File Report, 97-778, 13p. (on-line report)

Striegl, R.G., and Michmerhuizen, C.M., 1998, Hydrologic influence on methane and carbon dioxide dynamics at two north-central Minnesota lakes: Limnology and Oceanography, v. 43, p. 1519-1529. (on-line abstract)

Striegl, R.G., and Wickland, K.P., 1998, Effects of a clear cut harvest on soil respiration in a jack pine - linchen woodland: Canadian Journal of Forest Research, v. 28, p. 534-539. (on-line abstract)

Kiril
01-24-2009, 07:05 AM
And one more for the road: Paleohydrology and Climate Change (http://water.usgs.gov/nrp/proj.bib/jarrett.html)

REPORTS PUBLISHED 1998-2007

Jarrett, R.D., and Costa, J.E., 2006, 1976 Big Thompson Flood, Colorado--Thirty years later: U.S. Geological Survey Fact Sheet 2006-3095, 6 p. (on-line fact sheet in pdf format, 6.4 MB)

Jarrett, R.D., and Vandas, S.J. (compilers), 2006, 1976 Big Thompson Flood, Colorado: U.S. Geological Survey General Information Product 35. (on-line summary and access to poster in pdf format)

Dohm, J.M., Ferris, J.C., Barlow, N.G., Baker, V.R., Mahaney, W.C., Anderson, R.C., and Hare, T.M., 2004, The northwestern slope valleys (NSVs) region, Mars: A prime candidate site for the future exploration of Mars: Planetary and Space Sciences, v. 52, p. 189-198. (on-line abstract)

Tomlinson, E.M., Jarrett, R.D., Parzybok, T.W., and Trieste, D.J., 2004, Reanalysis of Colorado extreme rainstorm using GIS, paleoflood, and rainfall-runoff: Journal of Dam Safety, v. 2, no. 4, p. 21-31.

England, J.F. Jr., Jarrett, R.D., Salas, J.D., 2003, Data-based comparisons of moments esti-mators using historical and paleoflood data: Journal of Hydrology, v. 278, p. 172-196. (on-line abstract)

England, J.F., Salas, J.D., and Jarrett, R.D., 2003, Comparisons of two moments-based estimators that utilize historical and paleoflood data for the log Pearson type III distribution: Water Resources Research, v. 39, no. 9, p. 1243 (on-line abstract)

Jarrett, R.D., and England, J.F., Jr., 2002, Reliability of paleostage indicators for paleoflood studies in House, P.K., Webb, R.H., Baker, V.R., and Levish, D.R., eds., Ancient floods, modern hazards, principles and applications of paleoflood hydrology: American Geophysical Union Water Science and Application Series, v. 5, p. 91-109.

Yanosky, T.M., and Jarrett, R.D., 2002, Dendrochronologic evidence for the frequency and magnitude of paleofloods in House, P.K., Webb, R.H., Baker, V.R., and Levish, D.R., eds., Ancient floods, modern hazards, principles and applications of paleoflood hydrology: American Geophysical Union Water Science and Application Series, v. 5, p. 77-89.

Webb, R.H., and Jarrett, R.D., 2002, One-dimensional estimation techniques for discharges of paleofloods and historical floods in House, P.K., Webb, R.H., Baker, V.R., and Levish, D.R., eds., Ancient floods, modern hazards, principles and applications of paleoflood hydrology: American Geophysical Union Water Science and Application Series, v. 5, p. 111-125.

Jarrett, Robert D., 2001, Paleohydrologic estimates of convective rainfall in the Rocky Mountains: Proceedings, Symposium on Precipitation Extremes: Prediction, Impacts, and Responses, 14-18 January 2001, Albuquerque, NM, American Meteorological Society, Boston, MA, p. J40-J43.

Sueker, J.K., Clow, D.W., Ryan, J.R., and Jarrett, R.D., 2001, Effect of basin physical characteristics on solute fluxes in nine alpine/subalpine basins, Colorado, USA: Hydrological Processes, v. 15, no, 14, p. 2749-2769. (on-line abstract)

Jarrett, R.D., and Tomlinson, E.M., 2000, Regional interdisciplinary paleoflood approach to assess extreme flood potential: Water Resources Research, v. 36, no. 10, p. 2957-2984. (on-line abstract)

Jarrett, R.D., 2000, Paleoflood investigations for Cherry Creek basin, Eastern Colorado: 2000 Joint Conference on Water Resources Engineering and Water Resources Planning and Management [Proceedings], Minneapolis, MN, Jul, 30 - August 2, 2000, Reston, VA, American Society of Civil Engineers, p. 1-10.

Parrett, C., and Jarrett, R.D., 2000, Flood hydrology for Dry Creek, Lake County, Northwestern Montana: 2000 Joint Conference on Water Resources Engineering and Water Resources Planning and Management [Proceedings], Minneapolis, MN, Jul, 30 - August 2, 2000, Reston, VA, American Society of Civil Engineers.

Parrett, C., and Jarrett, R.D., 2000, Flood hydrology for Dry Creek, Lake County, Northwestern Montana: U.S. Geological Survey Water-Resources Investigations Report 00-4069, p. 1-12. (on-line abstract)

Sueker. I.K., Ryan. J.N., Kendall, C., Jarrett, R.D., 2000, Determination of hydrological pathways during snowmelt for alpine/subalpine basins, Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado: Water Resources Research, v. 36, p. 63-75. (on-line abstract)

Swain, R.E., and Jarrett, R.D., 2000, Monograph for using paleoflood data in water resources applications: 2000 Joint Conference on Water Resources Engineering and Water Resources Planning and Management [Proceedings], Minneapolis, MN, Jul, 30 - August 2, 2000, Reston, VA, American Society of Civil Engineers, p. 1-7.

National Research Council, 1999, Improving American river flood frequency analyses: Committee on American River Flood Frequencies , Water Science and Technology Board, National Academy Press, Washington, D.C., 120 p. (on-line publication)

Thompson, D.M., Wohl, E.E., and Jarrett, R.D., 1999, Velocity reversals and sediment sorting in pools and riffles controlled by channel constrictions: Geomorphology, v. 27, nos. 3-4, p. 229-241. (on-line abstract)

England, J.F., Jr., Salas, J.D., and Jarrett, R.D., 1998, A comparison of moments-based estimators for flood frequency analysis that incorporates historical information, in Proceedings of the First Federal Interagency Hydrologic Modeling Conference, Las Vegas, Nevada, April 19-23, 1998: prepared by the Subcommittee on Hydrology of the Interagency Advisory Committee on Water Data, v. 1 of 2, p. 4-37 to 4-44.

Jarrett, R.D., 1998, Paleoflood investigations for assessing extreme flooding for Elkhead Reservoir, Northwestern Colorado: Proceedings of, the First Federal Interagency Hydrologic Modeling Conference, Las Vegas, Nevada, April 19-12, 1998, prepared by the Subcommittee on Hydrology of the Interagency Advisory Committee on Water Data, Las Vegas, Nevada, v. 1 of 2, p. 4-85 - 4-91

Pruess, T., Wohl, E.E., and Jarrett, R.D., 1998, Methodology and implications of maximum paleodischarge estimates for mountain channels, Upper Animas River Basin, Colorado, U.S.A.: Arctic and Alpine Research, v. 30, n. 1, p. 40-50. (on-line abstract)

Kiril
01-24-2009, 07:06 AM
Let me know when you are done reading Rayho. For more on this, see the off-topic forum.

http://www.lawnsite.com/showthread.php?t=206782

rcreech
01-24-2009, 09:00 AM
Ray,

You can't argue with these people!

Kiril will try and cover you up with "stuff" he calls info and facts!

I can tell you now...QUIT or he will go on for over 30 pages! :)

You can find people and links to say what you are saying all day....but who says those people are right?

I could say the world is going to explode in 2010 and probably find books and "scientific" evivdence to support it if I look hard enough!

Point is...nobody knows on this topic, just guesses!

Kiril
01-24-2009, 09:06 AM
And yet another qualified scientific review. :rolleyes:
Take it to the off-topic forum big shots. That is where your political crap belongs.

phasthound
01-24-2009, 09:53 AM
OK, why can't we talk about this without attacking each other?

No matter what one believes about the causes of climate change, there is an over whelming and growing amount of evidence that we are seeing rapid transformations that are effecting all ecosystems. To deny this is akin to the old Emperor without clothes story.

This is not just about a change in temperature, wearing shorts will not affect a complete change in crop production and food distribution.

It's not about saving the planet, it's about our ability to adapt and survive long term, not just for 50 years. I completely agree that the earth is always changing and has changed drastically. Rapid change has always lead to
changes in populations and species domination.

I brought this subject up for discussion, not to attack anyone or force ideas at anyone. I only ask that those who choose attack mode to refrain.

Kiril
01-24-2009, 09:57 AM
This is not just about a change in temperature

Yes, that was the point of my first post.

I brought this subject up for discussion, not to attack anyone or force ideas at anyone. I only ask that those who choose attack mode to refrain.

Agreed. Keep the politics out of the science.

ted putnam
01-24-2009, 10:42 AM
i need a hug:dancing:

ME TOO!

Sometimes when politics and science are not used as the sole platform of an argument/discussion, common sense can go a long way...just a thought

KACYDS
01-24-2009, 11:00 AM
ME TOO!

Sometimes when politics and science are not used as the sole platform of an argument/discussion, common sense can go a long way...just a thought

I agree, but while some people may have book knowledge, they dont necessarily have common sense... Have seen this many times.

Rayholio
01-24-2009, 11:02 AM
Boy, all that from one sentence. I'm so happy to see how well you know me, and more importantly what I was talking about. So Rayho, what are your qualifications with respect to reviewing the science, and what science in particular have you reviewed?

You know.. That's a VERY good question.

What qualifies me to talk about the science of global warming? Why.. its the exact same thing that qualifies you to talk about it. The EXACT same thing that qualified Al Gore to make a movie about it.. The same thing that qualifies countless others to read my posts with disqust.. because they KNOW I'm wrong... The same qualifications were required from the makers of the kioto treaty, who sent out a request for a science breif 'proving global warming'... (and that's what they got back too.. your consencious) Did you notice a common theme there? Not one of us, or them is qualified to talk about it.. but it didn't stop them, and it won't stop me.

daveyo
01-24-2009, 11:10 AM
Cnn they are always truthful! :hammerhead:

Yea them and MSNBC!! :dizzy:

Rayholio
01-24-2009, 11:17 AM
I like your 50 pages of sceintific data.

Maybe you're misuderstanding this issue here..

I understand, and Beleive that global climate change is a reality.

Do you understand that there has NEVER been a 50 year period in 4 million years where there hasn't been some form of climate change on earth?

Climate change equates to species dieing.. new species evolving, and thriving.

How many species have lived, or DIED (extinct) thruoughout known history as a direct result of the weather? Probably billions.. and now it happens in our 50 years of industry, and it must be our fault?

Again.. What's the perfect temperature for earth? One that's perfect for you? maybe we could give you a little thermostat in you car to make it a little cooler for your walk on the beech?

Global Climate Change is a reality of floating around on a big rock, covered in gasses around a ball of fire in a shooting range which is canstantly in use.. These little microscopic ants on the rock will surely kill themselves before they break the rock.

Please take some time to answer my questions. I've answered every one of yours. If you want to debate this, you must do more than spew accepted propaganda.

Rayholio
01-24-2009, 11:18 AM
Yea them and MSNBC!! :dizzy:


Are they the ones who are a susidiary of GE... you know the ones who are making a fortune selling expensive lightbulbs and 'green' appliances?

Kiril
01-24-2009, 11:22 AM
@Rayho,

You missed my point entirely .... but whatever.

Out of respect for the OP requests, if you want to debate global warming, please take it to the off-topic forum. There are plenty of people there that will be more than happy to debate the issue with you.

tlg
01-24-2009, 11:59 AM
Let's not give government studies a whole lot of credibility. Our government is far from being a good source for information that seeks the truth or offers definitive answers. If you consider the number of times our government has been wrong a reasonable man would be skeptical. Anybody remember Y2K. We were warned for ever that our world was going to crash including our computers. Were still here. If anyone believes that our government and it's bureaucracy does not have it's own agenda swayed by whomever has the deepest pockets is truly out of reality. The scientific studies done by so called " independent" bodies are also questionable IMO. Data can be interpreted differently with plenty of gray areas. And who can say that adequate controls were taken in every case study presented. I can assure all of you that somebody somewhere can blow holes in any study. It's the expert witness syndrome. You can always find someone to support your views. Perhaps the trees that were dying were simply victim to a localized climate change. A few years ago scuba divers out in Lake Huron found a submerged forest 2 miles out from Lexington MI. Stumps five foot in diameter, logs and branches were found. Carbon dating determined that they were 6000 to 7000 years old. This factual information indicated that the Great Lakes were once much smaller than they are now and things were a lot dryer. Causes of this " global warming" are still unknown.

Probable causes of global warming can only be determined when the facts and circumstances would lead prudent people to believe it is occurring. Based on past climate changes, warm periods and cold periods over millions of years one would conclude it's a little to early to predict cause. Mans involvement is only over the last 100 years. Proponents of global warming would like us to believe we are the cause and it really is occurring. I believe a reasonable person would not jump to conclusions. Keeping an open mind is the best option at this time.

Kiril
01-24-2009, 12:04 PM
Let's not give government studies a whole lot of credibility.

I don't think you understand how these gov't studies work.

I believe a reasonable person would not jump to conclusions. Keeping an open mind is the best option at this time.

Agreed.

ted putnam
01-24-2009, 12:12 PM
I agree, but while some people may have book knowledge, they dont necessarily have common sense... Have seen this many times.

Ain't that the truth!. I've seen it here more than I care to...

Rayholio
01-24-2009, 12:13 PM
I missed your point entirely? I didn't realize that you had one, other than our ecosystem is changing.. And if you're not going to clairify your point I guess we ARE done.

You never once answered any of my questions to you, and when I force the matter, the conversation must end.. I understand ;) and I understand your not wanting to debate this... I've challenged you to a battle of ideas.. but as I can see you're unarmed.

Kiril
01-24-2009, 12:26 PM
I missed your point entirely? I didn't realize that you had one, other than our ecosystem is changing.. And if you're not going to clairify your point I guess we ARE done.

You never once answered any of my questions to you, and when I force the matter, the conversation must end.. I understand ;) and I understand your not wanting to debate this... I've challenged you to a battle of ideas.. but as I can see you're unarmed.

Take it to the off-topic forum Rayho. I posted my position in the thread referenced. You can read it or not, I don't care. I'm not going to get into another GW debate over your silly politics, as this was directly requested by Barry. Have some respect man.

I brought this subject up for discussion, not to attack anyone or force ideas at anyone. I only ask that those who choose attack mode to refrain.

Whitey4
01-24-2009, 12:44 PM
Yes, global warming is real. It is cyclical on this planet. I have little doubt that greenhouse gasses contribute to the acceleration of warming in this cycle but am also convinced it is just that, another cycle. Ice ages have come and gone, so has global warming. Is it a good idea to reduce emmisions as much as possible? Of course.

On a side note.... the other night the doorbell rings. A young man about 19 years old asks me if I would sign a petition to be sent to Albany to ban three "dangerous" pesticides. I asked him which ones. Kid had no clue. He said he's only been doing this for 2 days. After five minutes with him he walked away visibly shaken. I felt bad for him.

These kind of scare tactics are immoral. How many of my customers signed that petition to ban glyphosate or whatever I wonder? The tree huggers ARE a religion. They will do whatever they can to scare people, even recruit innocent kids to pound the pavement for them. Pathetic.

Rayholio
01-24-2009, 12:45 PM
I'm sorry... Barry has been part of this, and if he didn't want it in this furom, then he should not have posted it here.

Not to mentioned, he's the one that started asking why 'we' feel global warming is a farse..

Bottom line, the origional sintiment was good. We should reduce our 'impact' to me, that means use less fuel, apply pesticides responsibally, etc... These are all things I'm striving to do allready..

But the idea that suddenly this topic is 'off topic' ONLY when your side runs out of ammo is ridiculous.

DLAWNS
01-24-2009, 12:48 PM
On a side note.... the other night the doorbell rings. A young man about 19 years old asks me if I would sign a petition to be sent to Albany to ban three "dangerous" pesticides. I asked him which ones. Kid had no clue. He said he's only been doing this for 2 days. After five minutes with him he walked away visibly shaken. I felt bad for him.

These kind of scare tactics are immoral. How many of my customers signed that petition to ban glyphosate or whatever I wonder? The tree huggers ARE a religion. They will do whatever they can to scare people, even recruit innocent kids to pound the pavement for them. Pathetic.

That's ridiculous that they would do that! That crap pisses me off.

Kiril
01-24-2009, 01:57 PM
But the idea that suddenly this topic is 'off topic' ONLY when your side runs out of ammo is ridiculous.

Not out of ammo, just have no interest in rehashing this stupid debate for the third time.
Seems to me your trolling for an argument with me, probably due to my recent dismantling of Rod. If that is the case, tough, he got what was coming to him.

Personally I am on the fence with regard to GW, however based on the science I have reviewed, I believe it warrants attention. My point in THIS thread was we human beings have a significant impact on our planet.

Doesn't take a genius to see and realize we have a significant impact on our planet.

You then took this and assumed I was talking about GW .... and you were wrong. Therefore you entirely missed my point.

rcreech
01-24-2009, 02:43 PM
Whitey and TLG,

Totally agree with everything you said! :clapping:

So true...so true!

Rayholio
01-24-2009, 03:54 PM
Not out of ammo, just have no interest in rehashing this stupid debate for the third time.
Seems to me your trolling for an argument with me, probably due to my recent dismantling of Rod. If that is the case, tough, he got what was coming to him.

Personally I am on the fence with regard to GW, however based on the science I have reviewed, I believe it warrants attention. My point in THIS thread was we human beings have a significant impact on our planet.



You then took this and assumed I was talking about GW .... and you were wrong. Therefore you entirely missed my point.


Dismantling of rod? I'm afraid I don't know what that means... and I guess one mans argument is another mans debate... I HONESTLY can't see how anyone can get on this bandwagon, which seems to be more politically driven than scientifically driven.

As such, I want some answers to my questions. more importantly.. I want you, while trying to answer these 'hard' questions to examine, and defend your own stance. I'm not here to make myself feel better.. I'm actually trying to give people another point of veiw... because maybe you've noticed... right now we're getting pretty slanted... Welll. everything. And The proof is in the phrase "The debate is over."

And you're right.. I did assume that you were talking about global warming.. sorta.. But I also attempted to clairify with a simple question.. remember?

"Please explain to me our 'significant impact'... then explain to me how you KNOW that it is part of our foot print.."

I got no response.

rcreech
01-24-2009, 04:02 PM
Dismantling of rod? I'm afraid I don't know what that means... and I guess one mans argument is another mans debate... I HONESTLY can't see how anyone can get on this bandwagon, which seems to be more politically driven than scientifically driven.

As such, I want some answers to my questions. more importantly.. I want you, while trying to answer these 'hard' questions to examine, and defend your own stance. I'm not here to make myself feel better.. I'm actually trying to give people another point of veiw... because maybe you've noticed... right now we're getting pretty slanted... Welll. everything. And The proof is in the phrase "The debate is over."

And you're right.. I did assume that you were talking about global warming.. sorta.. But I also attempted to clairify with a simple question.. remember?

"Please explain to me our 'significant impact'... then explain to me how you KNOW that it is part of our foot print.."

I got no response.

Ray,

I totally agree with you! "They" always say we are close minded is the funny thing! :dizzy:

Thanks! I keep getting the same response from everyone else! Kiril thinks he is schooling me...but go over are read what I have posted!

He is a fool...so I don't worry about it much....just the facts as I always say!

He may think he "dismantled me" in his little mind...but this "ol' farm boy" can school him all day!

Whitey4
01-24-2009, 05:07 PM
KIRIL is a brainless dillweed. He thinks croquet should be played on a patch of sweet woodruff. He has a forum of his own to pacify him, but he still comes over here to stir up chit. I wonder how much he is paying this kid per signature that showed up on my porch the other night?

Oh... and saying he "dismantled rod" only proves one point. He deserves to be called what I called him. A dillweed. That happens to be my own personal synonym for another word, which I will not divulge here.

phasthound
01-24-2009, 06:10 PM
My apologies for starting this thread. It won't happen again.

It seems discussion is out of the question. Posters are only interested in bashing each other and claiming they are devoid of agendas and the others do not have science behind them. No matter what anyone says, they are met with nonsense. I feel like I am witnessing a "debate" in Congress.

Hopefully, at some point we can agree that there are common points to build on so we can work together instead of tearing each other apart.

Remember, the greatness of this country was built on compromise. It's sad that for the last 20 years or so this concept has been forgotten.

rcreech
01-24-2009, 07:45 PM
My apologies for starting this thread. It won't happen again.

It seems discussion is out of the question. Posters are only interested in bashing each other and claiming they are devoid of agendas and the others do not have science behind them. No matter what anyone says, they are met with nonsense. I feel like I am witnessing a "debate" in Congress.

Hopefully, at some point we can agree that there are common points to build on so we can work together instead of tearing each other apart.

Remember, the greatness of this country was built on compromise. It's sad that for the last 20 years or so this concept has been forgotten.

Barry,

Thanks for the pep talk but it is going to get worse then better!

This country is getting more devided all the time!

I don't like it...but that is just the way it is!

You probably should know better then to start topics that can lead to this!


Again...it is just the ol' us vs them bullcrap!

Funny thing is the same people (including myself) are always consistent with their stances!

Kiril
01-25-2009, 01:55 AM
You guys done with your circle jerk? Too funny.

Kiril
01-25-2009, 01:58 AM
"Please explain to me our 'significant impact'... then explain to me how you KNOW that it is part of our foot print.."

Step outside and look around. When I made that post I was thinking pollution and ecosystem destruction. But as we all know, people would rather think what they want instead of read what they see.

BTW, Rayho, what exactly is my stance?

Kiril
01-25-2009, 02:12 AM
He is a fool...so I don't worry about it much....just the facts as I always say! He may think he "dismantled me" in his little mind...but this "ol' farm boy" can school him all day!

Yes, as you have so aptly shown everyone. I'd tell you to go bury your head in some 10 foot topsoil in Kansas ... but then IT DOESN'T EXIST! :laugh:

Gotta love it when it is time to throw around opinion and insults, your posse is there for you,
but when you need them to help you defend an indefensible position, where are they?

Please continue with your circle jerk, it is quite amusing.

Grandview
01-25-2009, 07:58 AM
I will start changing my ways when Al Gore sells his four houses and is living in a one bedroom apartment. I noticed all the spokes people for global warming are huge energy consumers. Al Gore's house uses as much as a small village.

Rayholio
01-25-2009, 01:42 PM
Step outside and look around. When I made that post I was thinking pollution and ecosystem destruction. But as we all know, people would rather think what they want instead of read what they see.

BTW, Rayho, what exactly is my stance?

I step outside and look around... Today, it is unseasonably cold.. but the day before yesterday it was unseasonably warm... The air is clear and clean.. wish I could have my windows open year round. We get our drinking water from a 20ft deep well, and in the distance, there's a feild of plastic (vinyl) covered houses. I see a green lawn, and 7 75+ foot tall trees, which were planted by man. In the back is a garden. Occasionally I'll see learjets fly over, as I'm on final approach. These leave no visible exhaust..

From my front portch all I see is good stuardship. The things that you are terrified of are not an issue in my metropolus. The only issue I see from my front porch is over-population. In the last 100 or so years, we've come a long way in conservation, and it shows.

Bottom line, I don't think that common sense shows our 'signifigant impact' in any way, unless perhaps if I was told before I walked out the door how 'bad' it is out there.. Then I might look around, and see something different. Maybe I'd see all of the trees that were cut down so those houses could be built.. maybe I'd only think about the fuel being burnt by the lear jets etc.. but even then I'm having to ASSUME that these things are causing problems.. it's still not obvious..

And If I had to GUESS your stance.. Which appearantly I have to..

You must be a fellow who is concerned about your own, and others long term well being in terms of having an earth to call home.. Concerned enough to make it a part time hobbie.. the examination of new supporting evidence etc. This is based on what I've seen here.. I know that people will say, and display different sentiments in different company.. At any rate.. Your concern seems to be so great that you have a hard time beleiving any other non-supporting point of veiw. That's just what it seems like.



When it comes to climate change, NONE of you guys have been able to tell me, or provide links to some of the hard questions.. like what should humans set the thermostat at? Is what's best for the earth, best for human-kind? How do we know without a doubt that this is not natural cycle, and if can't decide without a doubt, what level of action is too harsh?

For me, ANY action, including the spreading of this farse religion is too harsh until someone can make a scientific case that can not be discounted by other numerous leaders of their fields... Some of the TOP metierologists beleive the accepted science is wrong.

rcreech
01-25-2009, 02:23 PM
Gotta love it when it is time to throw around opinion and insults, your posse is there for you,
but when you need them to help you defend an indefensible position, where are they?



They have actually been supporting me the whole time via phone, PM and e-mail...but they just chose not to get into the "corn talk".

Unlike your little organic buddies, my buddies are smart enough to not argue or make comment on somthing they don't know a lot about!

That is the thing about you organic nuts...you will argue anything, even when you don't know what you are talking about!

I have got a kick out of some of your buddies comments on corn! I say...GET IN THE REAL WORLD!!!! :laugh:

tlg
01-25-2009, 02:26 PM
As I read through all the post here I've concluded that we are all doomed. Let's assume we all want clean water, air and planet that's unpolluted. Let's also assume we all want a planet that is not going to melt down from man made global warming. Common sense would dictate that we all live here on Earth and would like to continue our lives as we know them to be. Whether or not you believe in man induced global warming or some sort of planetary cycle causing climate change, we should at least listen to each other. If we are in fact warming and we want the human race to survive I think we owe it to ourselves to not rule anything out yet. Our own demise will happen when we can't have an honest discussion without personnel attacks. Nothing gets resolved that way. If man made global warming is real we will never find a way out. We can't change our ways fast enough, the cost involved will be enormous, and a consensus will never be reached because we all think that we are right and everybody else is wrong. It was 4 degrees here this morning and awful cold the last few days. This trend scares me. Isn't anybody concerned about the coming ice age?

phasthound
01-25-2009, 03:12 PM
As I read through all the post here I've concluded that we are all doomed. Let's assume we all want clean water, air and planet that's unpolluted. Let's also assume we all want a planet that is not going to melt down from man made global warming. Common sense would dictate that we all live here on Earth and would like to continue our lives as we know them to be. Whether or not you believe in man induced global warming or some sort of planetary cycle causing climate change, we should at least listen to each other. If we are in fact warming and we want the human race to survive I think we owe it to ourselves to not rule anything out yet. Our own demise will happen when we can't have an honest discussion without personnel attacks. Nothing gets resolved that way. If man made global warming is real we will never find a way out. We can't change our ways fast enough, the cost involved will be enormous, and a consensus will never be reached because we all think that we are right and everybody else is wrong. It was 4 degrees here this morning and awful cold the last few days. This trend scares me. Isn't anybody concerned about the coming ice age?

I'm just going to stay in my basement. :sleeping::drinkup::headphones:

treegal1
01-25-2009, 05:33 PM
My apologies for starting this thread. It won't happen again.

It seems discussion is out of the question. Posters are only interested in bashing each other and claiming they are devoid of agendas and the others do not have science behind them. No matter what anyone says, they are met with nonsense. I feel like I am witnessing a "debate" in Congress.

Hopefully, at some point we can agree that there are common points to build on so we can work together instead of tearing each other apart.

Remember, the greatness of this country was built on compromise. It's sad that for the last 20 years or so this concept has been forgotten.

Why not just get together and all of you can whip it out and measure up and put this to rest for once.... its like a car crash you know that there is something bad about to happen but you just can not look away

LIBERTYLANDSCAPING
01-25-2009, 07:21 PM
My apologies for starting this thread. It won't happen again.



Yes, It was VERY FOOLISH for you to start a thread about Global Warming in the pesticide forum-it should have been put somewhere else. People come here to read & discuss lawn care, not scams (global warming) Here is a link to a story about one of the main NASA scientist who is vocal about global warming-In the 1970's http://newsbusters.org/blogs/noel-sheppard/2007/09/19/nasa-scientists-predicted-new-ice-age-1971
He PREDICTED A COMING ICE AGE! Oops, maybe he read his data on an upside down chart:rolleyes: It's hard to beleive so many people could be so easily fooled, but then again, look at the Y2K scare:hammerhead:

Kiril
01-25-2009, 10:28 PM
Fuel for the fire -- pollution (tip of the iceburg)

http://www.pasadena.edu/wetlands_research/images/coastal_pollution.jpg
http://www.freefoto.com/images/13/08/13_08_52---Industry-Liquid-Pollution_web.jpghttp://www.breathepureair.com/airqualityblog/wp-content/uploads/air-pollution1.jpghttp://photo.ortho.free.fr/images/divers/pollution.JPGhttp://www.scientificblogging.com/graphics/beijing%20car%20pollution.jpeghttp://img222.imageshack.us/img222/6146/pollution2jr.jpg



For More Examples

http://postconflict.unep.ch/galleries4.php?key=pollution%20sources

Rayholio
01-25-2009, 10:37 PM
No offense bro.. but those pics arn't in america I'm willing to bet... and it they are, it's post katrina, or some such..

maybe you should go to china to do your preaching.. you're making us look prett good.

Kiril
01-25-2009, 10:46 PM
More fuel .. ecosystem and habitat destruction

http://images.onesite.com/my.telegraph.co.uk/user/blueplanet/fish5-uae.gova.jpghttp://amphibiaweb.org/images/clearcut.jpghttp://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/vis/a000000/a002200/a002210/lori_2000c_web.jpghttp://www.airheadsscuba.com/kayesite1/images/construction.jpghttp://puertogalera.rainforest.googlepages.com/100_6809.JPG/100_6809-large.JPGhttp://www.stockpix.com/image/3094.jpghttp://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/8b/Urban_sprawl_as_seen_from_Tokyo_tower_towards_West.jpg/800px-Urban_sprawl_as_seen_from_Tokyo_tower_towards_West.jpghttp://taos-telecommunity.org/EPOW/EPOW-Archive/archive_2007/EPOW-070416_files/DSC00140b%20Tucson%20urban%20sprawl_s.jpghttp://spaceflightnow.com/news/n0106/02landsat/dcbalt.jpghttp://www.vestaldesign.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/coral-reef-canary-project.jpghttp://www.paulkuhngallery.com/assets/img/Edward_Burtynsky%5Cicon14.jpg

tlg
01-25-2009, 10:50 PM
Yes, It was VERY FOOLISH for you to start a thread about Global Warming in the pesticide forum-it should have been put somewhere else. People come here to read & discuss lawn care, not scams (global warming) Here is a link to a story about one of the main NASA scientist who is vocal about global warming-In the 1970's http://newsbusters.org/blogs/noel-sheppard/2007/09/19/nasa-scientists-predicted-new-ice-age-1971
He PREDICTED A COMING ICE AGE! Oops, maybe he read his data on an upside down chart:rolleyes: It's hard to beleive so many people could be so easily fooled, but then again, look at the Y2K scare:hammerhead:

This was exactly what I was talking about. 36 years ago we were all going to freeze to death in less than 50 years. Today we are being lead down the warming to Armageddon path. These " scientist " back in the 70's were pretty sure of their predictions. I don't imagine the science changed to make these predictions, sure looks like the planet has though. That's what it has always done.

Kiril
01-25-2009, 11:16 PM
No offense bro.. but those pics arn't in america I'm willing to bet... and it they are, it's post katrina, or some such...

Yes, I forgot, the United States is the only country on this planet, and pollution outside the United States has no effect on global ecosystems. Typical arrogant ..... :rolleyes:

United States Specific Pictures For Your Viewing Pleasure.

http://www.greenpacks.org/wp-content/uploads/2008/03/water-quality-plastic-pollution.jpghttp://depts.washington.edu/mesaair/images/32222088-1.JPGhttp://www.aboutmyplanet.com/files/2008/07/air-pollution.thumbnail.jpghttp://www.fws.gov/northeast/nyfo/ec/images/lobster.jpghttp://www.nrcs.usda.gov/news/images/salinity.jpghttp://menlocampus.wr.usgs.gov/50years/accomplishments/images/PWS_tanker_oil_spill.jpghttp://www.engin.umich.edu/~cre/web_mod/la_basin/smog.jpghttp://www.gwpc.org/CallToAction/images/coal%20strip%20mining.jpghttp://www.agreenamerica.org/images/moonScape.jpeghttp://www.nasa.gov/centers/goddard/images/content/95248main_theb1365.jpg

Kiril
01-26-2009, 12:12 AM
More From The Glorious Home Land

http://www.californiaprogressreport.com/Prospect-Island-Dead%20Fish.jpghttp://pics.livejournal.com/jblaque/pic/000qbcs2http://onfinite.com/libraries/1283872/5e9.jpghttp://media.adn.com/smedia/2008/02/25/12/390-EH_EV001.standalone.prod_affiliate.7.jpghttp://www.sfgate.com/blogs/images/sfgate/foreigndesk/2007/05/06/saltonsea.jpghttp://mw2.google.com/mw-panoramio/photos/medium/5878142.jpg

Canada
http://www.amxfiles.com/stoneji/97trip/devastation.jpg

Rayholio
01-26-2009, 12:49 AM
No.. I never said that if it's not in the states, that it's illrelavant. I was getting at the fact that your enviormentalist propaganda, and decades old photos are targeting one of the few populations in the world that ALLREADY cares..

Most of these photos are trash for a mutitude of reasons.. I've been to many of these larger cities.. including NY, NY (as photographed above) and they have all been very clean, and I could see forever... from the helicopter rides, and the flights in, and out, I could see just as far as in KC, MO or anywhere in between.

Here's an assignment for you.. You go out into your own home town tomorrow, and take a few modern pictures of the 'problem' as you see it, and bring them back here..

Pics of dead fish, and natural disasters mean nothing to me.. Dead fish and natural disaters pre-date mankind. so spare me this..

The oil spill pic is nice, and certainly has an impact on its local eco-system.. but it's not like we arn't doing a lot to try to fix this..

General trash piling up on beeches, and in gutters? This is a true reality.. one that comes with the assholes who don't properly handle their garbage. but show me how it contributes to global warming, in any study scientific or otherwise.

The world... even america is grossly overpopulated. And as such we have some messes... however this does not indicate an impact on earth. only on ourselves.

And trust me.. sooner or later... this over population problem will be resolved... and the earth will live on.. long after we're gone, and forgotton.

Kiril
01-26-2009, 01:22 AM
Denial will get you nowhere. If you follow the source of the pics you will find they are ALL human caused, alot of them fairly recent.
Fact of the matter is, we DO have a significant impact on this planet and all your rationalization and denials will not change that.

treegal1
01-26-2009, 02:36 AM
Denial is a river in Egypt? oh shite that's all messed up to.

don't worry about us down here we still drink the water, oh wait whats this, a notice from the heath dept. says that every one in my area has to plug and cap there wells in the next 90 days and use city water, as the levels of pollution are no longer acceptable. that happened naturally??

so we got rid of all our super fund sites???air alerts in Atlanta???we don't need the EPA any more???leaded gas was great that why we still use it??? where do I buy some DDT??how about some ALAR, some of us that have been around remember that???no big deal, some melamine in the milk, adds protein?

where did the hole in the ozone layer go??? oh there's no ozone left, that takes care of the hole then.LOL

Kiril shame on you for bringing up a topic such as this here. Are you mad, insight and reason here. we still are not done with corn yet. and then for you to take such a bold step it a multidisciplinary science like global warming is just risible. ( I did not say it does or does not exist)


singed, tree hugging wacko


oh next to be logged..........

Rayholio
01-26-2009, 03:53 AM
I don't believe denial is descriptive of how I percive your propaganda..

The difference is in perception.

Our piled trash, and even the possibility of man made global warming (although not evident) has no 'impact on earth' The impact is on currently existing life here on earth.

The earth and life on it will all be here when the smoke clears despite piled trash, and nuke-u-lar wastelands. This is SELF-evident now, and supported by pre-historic findings. We have seen a forest grow after a fire, we beleive the earth has recovered from devistating astaroid strikes, and we've seen 'global climate change' happen over night based on volcanic activity..

What is NOT self evident is how the earth would react to losing its ability to cycle teperatures, melting fresh water here, and creating salt water there.. This is something that has happened thruout history... and what happens if we STOP the natural cycle.. could it cause polar shift? there have to be variables that are completely unpredicable.

IF you truely beleive that humans are destroying the earth.. how do you fix it?? -seriously... answer this one...

TreeGal... Some of those instances happened based on ignorance.. but in every case the problem is being addressed. And no need for the epa? I admit it needs work.. but I'd be interested to hear the reasoning behind that one..

You ARE a tree hugging wacko.. and not because of your stance on pollution.. but because you seem to think that people don't care about having clean air, food, and water... Can I find anyone reading this.. anyone who doesn't want clean air and water?

Your mistake is that you think you're better than everyone else.. somehow enlightened.. but the truth is, that we're all more alike than you give us credit for.. We ALL want a clean home / lawn /city/ country / and even world. Fundimentally, we agree...

I personally take conservation seriously. For my neighbors, family, and myself... After all, when you're more efficiant, and caring, you're also more prosperous. This is why I take proper pesticide use very seriously. This is why I eat out of my own garden, drink from a well.. Heat with wood only, and drive small cars (I've gotta be the only landscaper in town who doesn't own anything with 8 cylenders) I clean up my trash when I go out in the wild, and barry my crap when I camp. I hunt, kill, and eat about 50% of my own meat, I share the surplus. I plant trees for myself every year, and my dark green grass consumes 4 times more carbon than most other equally sized lawns. My footprint (carbon, waste, or otherwise) is probably smaller than any of the "tree huggers" whom I'm speaking with right now.. so stop getting all rightous on me, and lets have a REAL discussion. We're NOT that different.

Kiril
01-26-2009, 09:56 AM
Kiril shame on you for bringing up a topic such as this here.

Its all Barry's fault. :laugh: I just thought it was prudent to offer some visual stimuli ... you know what they say ... a picture is worth a thousand words.