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4.3mudder
01-26-2009, 02:06 PM
Hi, If there is anyone can help in the situation that I am in. I have a customer that has a fairly small yard, with solid bermuda. During the mowing seaosn I think he usually uses the Scotts people to come out and give the yard a good spray. Right now everything is brown because of the season. He was talking about weeds coming up in the yard. I did a drive by and didn't see any kinds of weeds anywhere. Everything is in hibernation as I would say. I did see some green grass along his wooden fence line, that may have been some weeds, but hardly any at all. Is there anything I can put out to maybe get rid of the weeds and maybe somewhat turn the grass a bit greener. or something that I cna put down to help out in the spring, I know that it is really to late for a winterizer. I am from Texas. Which here, it is rarely cold, maybe for a couple of days then it is warm again. I was thinking of maybe some ironite or the scotts bonus s. I don't have a Lesco dealer around me so that is kind of out of the question. Thanks for anyone's help.

LawnTamer
01-26-2009, 02:35 PM
Unless you are a licensed applicator, you are stuck pulling weeds. If you are caught applying pesticides (including herbicides) commercially w/o a license, it is a steep fine, and you may lose your insurance.

So far as the lawn is concerned, I don't treat Bermuda, but a lot of guys here do. Here with our cool season grasses, a good dose (say 1lb/1,000sqft of ammonium nitrate will give you a quick green-up in the early spring. If you can't find ammonium nitrate, ammonium sulfate will work too.

4.3mudder
01-26-2009, 03:02 PM
I have put out fertilizer, ant control, but all in graunal style I use with a spreader. I don't do it a whole lot, but I have never done it in this part of the season.

Where would I find the ammonium nitrate or the ammonium sulfate? Thanks

Kiril
01-26-2009, 03:08 PM
Compost does a soil good!

Hoots
01-26-2009, 03:33 PM
The grass is dormant. The cold nights (sometimes days) frost and cold soil temps will prevent the Bermuda from greening up regardless of what you put on it. The only way to have green grass this time of year in the metroplex is to have planted rye grass in the fall.

Tamer is correct. If you don't have a license you can get hefty fines if you get caught. THE ONLY product you can apply without a license is straight fertilizer. No Weed-N-Feed (which is a waste of money) No insecticide etc.

Ammonium Nitrate is not something you want to have (even if you have permission) If I am not mistaken, it is one fertilizer product that is restricted because it can be used as a bomb making material. Not something you want to be responsible for.

Real Green
01-26-2009, 03:35 PM
Compost does a soil good!

Depends on what type of compost he uses and where he gets it from. He could end up with a whole lot more weeds than he bargined for! :laugh:

I have put out fertilizer, ant control, but all in graunal style I use with a spreader. I don't do it a whole lot, but I have never done it in this part of the season.

Where would I find the ammonium nitrate or the ammonium sulfate? Thanks

You still have yet to confirm if you have the proper licensing for proper application of pesticides and herbicides in turf and ornamental commercially. Hopefully you pursue this before you get involved in a situation such as this.

In terms of offering specific advice, do we have anyone on this board in Texas or around there to offer suggestions for this fellow?

4.3mudder
01-26-2009, 03:41 PM
Ok, I will sum this up and tell the customer there isn't anything I can do for now. I appreciate yall's input.

Sorry, no I have no licensing for the application. Usually I use the products either from Home Depot or Lowes. Which, I knew you had to have a license to put out the commercial fertilizers and what not, but not the regualar stuff the home improvement places sells. Meaning homeowner products that are sold to the general public is what I put out. Scotts bonus S, ironite, those fertilizers and such

EagleLandscape
01-26-2009, 05:18 PM
Do this. Call Chad or Gary at Lesco 972.681.5511.

Tell them give you information on how to become licensed, and then they can give your products that will knock the socks off of your customers, and will teach you/help you with anything you need.

They are great guys. Call them and theyll help you out.

Hoots
01-26-2009, 05:51 PM
Ok, I will sum this up and tell the customer there isn't anything I can do for now. I appreciate yall's input.

Sorry, no I have no licensing for the application. Usually I use the products either from Home Depot or Lowes. Which, I knew you had to have a license to put out the commercial fertilizers and what not, but not the regualar stuff the home improvement places sells. Meaning homeowner products that are sold to the general public is what I put out. Scotts bonus S, ironite, those fertilizers and such

You hit the nail on the head about nothing you can do for now.

You cannot apply any chemical for profit without a license. Straight fertilizer is acceptable.

Call Mark with the Texas Department of Agriculture (he is the chief inspector for pesticide programs in Dallas) and ask him if you can purchase these products at Home Depot etc. and apply them on someones property for profit without a license. Let us know what the answer is.

(972)263-5035

I am not trying to be rude, I am only trying to keep you out of trouble. There are too many people applying products incorrectly.

Follow some of the other guys advice and take the steps to get licensed. In the meantime, please subcontract your applications to a licensed company.

LawnTamer
01-26-2009, 06:01 PM
The grass is dormant. The cold nights (sometimes days) frost and cold soil temps will prevent the Bermuda from greening up regardless of what you put on it. The only way to have green grass this time of year in the metroplex is to have planted rye grass in the fall.

Tamer is correct. If you don't have a license you can get hefty fines if you get caught. THE ONLY product you can apply without a license is straight fertilizer. No Weed-N-Feed (which is a waste of money) No insecticide etc.

Ammonium Nitrate is not something you want to have (even if you have permission) If I am not mistaken, it is one fertilizer product that is restricted because it can be used as a bomb making material. Not something you want to be responsible for.

Yes, straight AM is quite dangerous, they have a new process where they bind it with calcium, it is still usable to the plant, and will still raise soil temps, but it isn't explosive. It does cost more though. It also lowers the analysis. They take 34-0-0, but by the time they bind and stabilize it, the analysis is around 27-0-0.

Hoots
01-26-2009, 06:06 PM
Yes, straight AM is quite dangerous, they have a new process where they bind it with calcium, it is still usable to the plant, and will still raise soil temps, but it isn't explosive. It does cost more though. It also lowers the analysis. They take 34-0-0, but by the time they bind and stabilize it, the analysis is around 27-0-0.

Thanks LawnTamer. Even when helping to give advice, we can all learn something too.

4.3mudder
01-26-2009, 07:30 PM
Ok, now I know what to do. Thats for you guy's help. I guess I learned more than I wanted to today! lol

Ric
01-26-2009, 09:04 PM
Yo

A different taken is Lawn Paint. My market area just had it's first freeze in over 10 years so painting lawns green in winter is not a good market for me. But I have done it. I can seen a Market for lawn painting all over the south where lawns go dormant and turn brown. Bermuda seems to be one turf that could really use a good paint job in the winter season. However a reasonable cost turf paint is required in order to make this a viable market.