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View Full Version : Scotts fert now 40lb bags not 50lb anymore Lowes/HD


mikesturf
02-01-2009, 09:48 AM
I like to see what Joe homeowner's fert prices are and noticed that the Scotts "50 pound" bag is now a 40 or 42 pound bag. Wasn't it a 50 pound bag in the past? They claim it STILL covers 15,000 sf. Crabgrass control is $57 and Summerguard 28-3-8 (no grub control) is $63 per bag. I remember the N being 32. Smaller bag and less N covers the same sq:confused:

lawntennis
02-01-2009, 10:59 AM
They were always 50 lb bags before. Were these prices at Home Depot, Lowe's or any of the big guys? If so it's nice to see the home owner's price going up considerably.

mikesturf
02-01-2009, 11:12 AM
These prices are from Lowes, my HD did not have fert out yet.

Jason Rose
02-01-2009, 11:22 AM
Scotts fertilizer, their homeowner lines that are a powdery "homogenous" blend NEVER came in 50 lb bags. Their bag weight was always dependant on what the blend was in the bag. Unlike commercial fertilizers that are always 50 pounds and then have varying coverage, say between 12,000 and 18,000, Scotts bags theirs to cover XX square feet, (5K, or 15K).

Now I know that Home depot sells Lesco fert, and I've seen it in 48lb. bags before. There was some other brand as well that shrunk their weight, don't remember the brand though. Yes, the fert prices on the consumer end has gone up as well. Most people when buying one bag or two aren't going to notice much though.

Ric
02-01-2009, 12:17 PM
Scotts fertilizer, their homeowner lines that are a powdery "homogenous" blend NEVER came in 50 lb bags. Their bag weight was always dependant on what the blend was in the bag. Unlike commercial fertilizers that are always 50 pounds and then have varying coverage, say between 12,000 and 18,000, Scotts bags theirs to cover XX square feet, (5K, or 15K).

Now I know that Home depot sells Lesco fert, and I've seen it in 48lb. bags before. There was some other brand as well that shrunk their weight, don't remember the brand though. Yes, the fert prices on the consumer end has gone up as well. Most people when buying one bag or two aren't going to notice much though.

Jason

If memory serves me correct then I agree Scotts never had the standard 50lb bag for retail sale. I seem to remember a 30 lb bag of weed & feed to cover 5,000 sq ft. But then I have never been a Scotts fan.

The point I would like make was on the Nightly TV News. Seems food packages are getting smaller while the price remains the same Manufactures are packing 28 oz in place of 32 oz quarts. Paper towel rolls are now shorter Etc. For years now the deli dept has priced cold cuts by the 1/4 or 1/2 pound because of sticker shock. IMHO the economy has not hit bottom and it will take a very long time IF it can be turned around and brought back to former levels.

KACYDS
02-01-2009, 01:12 PM
Jason

If memory serves me correct then I agree Scotts never had the standard 50lb bag for retail sale. I seem to remember a 30 lb bag of weed & feed to cover 5,000 sq ft. But then I have never been a Scotts fan.

The point I would like make was on the Nightly TV News. Seems food packages are getting smaller while the price remains the same Manufactures are packing 28 oz in place of 32 oz quarts. Paper towel rolls are now shorter Etc. For years now the deli dept has priced cold cuts by the 1/4 or 1/2 pound because of sticker shock. IMHO the economy has not hit bottom and it will take a very long time IF it can be turned around and brought back to former levels.

Ric,

You are correct, when I buy a case of beer now, it has 20 bottles now vs. the 24, they use to have.:cry::cry:

mikesturf
02-01-2009, 02:04 PM
I buy a giant bag of Doritos, open it and 2/3 the bag is air.

NEW CITY LAWN CARE LLC
02-01-2009, 02:17 PM
I don't think scott's has ever been 50 lb. bags, if I remember right their small bag is 18 lbs., and their large bag is 42 lbs. approx..

Whitey4
02-01-2009, 02:31 PM
Yup, they sell 5k bags and 15k bags.... the weight changes based on the formuation of any given fert or control. Same thing with the seed... they sell it by coverage. As far as I know, that hasn't changed.

What will be interesting is how much MSMA and CAMA they will put on the store shelves this year. Some of that stock can sit in a store for 3 years.

Runner
02-02-2009, 03:30 PM
They do the same thing with groceries. A half gallon of ice cream is no longer a half gallon. It is now 1.75 qts.. There was an interesting news story a while ago that told about some of this creative packaging. You have to really watch the oz. amount and such on the packaging. Many of these products - like mustard jars while looking the normal size, will have an indentation on the bottom of the jar, so the actual contents is less.

Mscotrid
02-02-2009, 04:09 PM
Even coke is jumping on the band wagon. Saw a great price advertised for a case of Diet Coke, only it was a 20 pack..

Frontier-Lawn
02-02-2009, 06:13 PM
Ric,

You are correct, when I buy a case of beer now, it has 20 bottles now vs. the 24, they use to have.:cry::cry:

also we are in a test market here for pepsi, they did away with the 12 & 24 packs. now we have 8 and 18 packs

on a side note i had to go get some fert from HD for the mom inlaw and the vergo i belive was a 16lb bag @ $14.99

Whitey4
02-02-2009, 07:25 PM
They do the same thing with groceries. A half gallon of ice cream is no longer a half gallon. It is now 1.75 qts.. There was an interesting news story a while ago that told about some of this creative packaging. You have to really watch the oz. amount and such on the packaging. Many of these products - like mustard jars while looking the normal size, will have an indentation on the bottom of the jar, so the actual contents is less.

I think you missed the fact that Scotts does not sell by weight, they sell by coverage. Always have. The ice cream analogy is not correct. See my previous post.

Runner
02-02-2009, 08:56 PM
Sorry...I wasn't talking about the Scotts...I got a little off subject. I was referring more to the groceries. :)

Think Green
02-02-2009, 09:16 PM
While reading my Lawn and Landscape magazine back in October (I believe was the issue), a trend will start on the professional level, but will settle in the small consumer market starting in 2009. All the main players, such as, Monsanto-Drexel,Dupont,etc. will now conveniently resize their chemical containers. Their scope is to hasten storage and wasteful usuage of products. Yes, the containers will get smaller such as the Roundup prepackaged pouches for gallon usage. Homeowners will have to shell out a little more money at the store to get a more convenient premeasured product for their lawn and weed problems. The fertilizer market at those mega-retail outlets have always sold ferts in smaller more accessible bags to the general public. The convenience of selling a product that will correlate with the spreaders they offer is a super plus to the homeowner. "I used to work for Lowe's as a Live Nursery Specialsit!" WOOOPPII!
However, herbicide manufacturer's will offer smaller containers to the professional including fertilizer bags, herbicides, and insecticides. Less carry over from year to year and less disposal into waste sites and drains.
That is what the articles were advocating>!!

Hissing Cobra
02-03-2009, 12:36 AM
I've regularly seen Scotts bags for 15,000 sq. ft. of product that have been packaged in 40 lb., 42 lb., and 48 lb. bags. Those seem to be normal sizes for Scotts products at the retail level.

ted putnam
02-03-2009, 12:55 AM
They do the same thing with groceries. A half gallon of ice cream is no longer a half gallon. It is now 1.75 qts.. There was an interesting news story a while ago that told about some of this creative packaging. You have to really watch the oz. amount and such on the packaging. Many of these products - like mustard jars while looking the normal size, will have an indentation on the bottom of the jar, so the actual contents is less.

I noticed the same thing...Sneaky Bastards!

RLC12065
02-03-2009, 08:21 PM
food companies have always changed the size of the products. there are only 2 ways to change things, price or size. i worked for a supermarket for 11 years and theyve always done this. they have an 18oz product for $1.59, they raise the price til it get to a point ($1.99) then they keep the price the same ($1.99) and then decrease the size, 15oz. so after 10 years a product that was $1.59 for 18oz is now $1.99 for 15oz. sometimes after the size has decreased enough they offer a new size, 18oz but for $2.39. then the process starts all over.

humble1
02-03-2009, 08:36 PM
Ric,

You are correct, when I buy a case of beer now, it has 20 bottles now vs. the 24, they use to have.:cry::cry:

i buy 12 otherwise i feel like I have a drinking problem, well its not a problem for me, I love beer:drinkup:

KACYDS
02-03-2009, 08:39 PM
i buy 12 otherwise i feel like I have a drinking problem, well its not a problem for me, I love beer:drinkup:

I drink to that.............lol:drinkup::drinkup::drinkup:

greendoctor
02-04-2009, 01:28 AM
All the main players, such as, Monsanto-Drexel,Dupont,etc. will now conveniently resize their chemical containers. Their scope is to hasten storage and wasteful usuage of products.

However, herbicide manufacturer's will offer smaller containers to the professional including fertilizer bags, herbicides, and insecticides. Less carry over from year to year and less disposal into waste sites and drains.
That is what the articles were advocating>!!

For many years, this has been something people like Dow, BASF, and Bayer have been getting s*** from me about for years. Why is the minimum pack size for a low rate product 2/12 gallons. They mumbled some excuse about shipping and storage. Guess what? That 2/12 gallon jug can be a problem in itself. As much as I do apply, there are some products that are not broadcast all over the place, so I have no need for a package that will cover 10-40 acres. On top of that, there is the issue of how chemicals do not improve with age, they are not a 1980 Rothschild. I want to be able to use something up within one year of purchase. My state DOA highly discourages keeping old chemicals. It is a red flag when they see really old bottles and bags. In the rest of the world, those same companies offer their products in sizes starting in one liter cans for liquids or 500 g bottles for DF type chemicals. I am talking products intended for ag, T & O or IVM use by professionals. Note that I said bottles for DF. With the blessing of my DOA, I routinely transfer simazine DF into a sealed bucket. Even though the labeling prohibits transfer to another container. The plastic bag it is sold in is not made to store the product once opened. It lets in contamination from water, dirt, etc and it is a spill hazard. That too, is a 10 or 25 lb bag. At label rates, that is enough product to treat 10-25 acres, depending on the size of the bag. I am not saying that everything must be packaged in 1 acre sized packages, but for Heaven's sake, give me the choice.