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mrkosar
02-02-2009, 01:12 PM
i've been looking for storage the past few weeks and one guy asked me today if the fertilizer is flammable. the answer is no right? storing straight fertilizers is fine, but if it has pesticides then I need a license right?

anything i need to worry about if i were to store it in someone's garage besides them stealing fert?

mngrassguy
02-02-2009, 07:16 PM
Look at the MSDS. Many states require a license to apply fertilizer. What are you going to do for weed control once you feed the weeds? Sorry to be such a downer but stick to what you know and do best. Leave the rest up to the pros. Just my 2 cents.

mngrassguy
02-02-2009, 07:21 PM
Storing fert in a garage? What if there is a fire and the fire dept dumps a ton of water on it? Fert running down the street into storm sewers, massive clean-up, very expensive. A site plan needs to be filed with the FD so that doesn't happen.

treegal1
02-02-2009, 07:56 PM
http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&safe=off&sa=X&oi=spell&resnum=1&ct=result&cd=1&q=ohio+fertilizer+storage+regulations&spell=1

then call the fire dept and ask????

mrkosar
02-02-2009, 08:06 PM
Look at the MSDS. Many states require a license to apply fertilizer. What are you going to do for weed control once you feed the weeds? Sorry to be such a downer but stick to what you know and do best. Leave the rest up to the pros. Just my 2 cents.


i will be storing the weed control in my own garage, but can't fit all my fert in one place, so I'm looking for possibly homeowners with unused storage areas. i do know fert/squirt and do it well, but was just asking a simple question about the hazards. i know...i know...read the label. i do most times, but with the vast amount of LCO's that have probably ran into this issue before, I figured why not just ask on lawnsite.com. i have a license and have been doing this for many years, but as you grow, you run into certain issues you have not experienced. That is when i reach out for other LCO's that have more than likely faced and found a solution to that issue. Why take 30 minutes out of my day to research it, when I know I can post this question, get a solid answer from someone who has already avoided this obstacle, all while only taking 2 minutes from my busy day?

a fire at any place with fert would result in a nasty run off situation whether at a garage or storage place.

someone has had to ran into this issue before. not everyone can go from loading up daily at Lesco to a full warehouse full of fert. anyone else?

mngrassguy
02-02-2009, 08:19 PM
FYI....MSDS is not a label. Good info Treegal.

LushGreenLawn
02-02-2009, 08:31 PM
How much fertilizer are we talking about here? Your asking if you need a license to apply fertilizer, so I doubt your storing a semi load.

Also, come on guys.... If it catches on fire it will wash into storm drains when the fire department puts it out? That would happen anywhere it was stored, it dosn't matter if its in someones garage or in a storage facility.

mngrassguy
02-02-2009, 08:44 PM
OK, I'll try this again. I store fert in my garage. I had to file a site plan with my local FD along with a MSDS for each product stored. I also had to put a sign outside the garage stating where it is stored. They also told me to keep it covered in plastic at all times. Talk about PITA. This is required ANYWHERE fert/pesticeds are stored.

treegal1
02-02-2009, 09:39 PM
not in Fl, they can get you to put it up and have a fire suppression system, spill container, cleanup gear and the fire Marshall gets his $$, monthlys and placards for the bays, fire cabinet if applicable. notice to adjoining buildings, fire wall upgrades, NFPA, and all the things you said in triplicate, quarterly!!!

Think Green
02-02-2009, 09:53 PM
Don't allow your fertilizers to come into contact with certain oils. The results will be catastrofic.

All of our fertilizers are kept away from our pesticides (Liquids) We place the ferts on pallets so they don't come into contact with the concrete to pull moisture. All the pesticides are stored in metal-vented enclosure babinets in my 20x30 shop building.
Make sure you have ventilation. Make sure that all the materials are labeled correctly and posted signs are visible. Have hazmat cleanup supplies, and a fire extenguisher handy. Really, you may consider consulting you local fire code and materials agencies before storing quantities of products or fertilizers. Each state will differ depending on the locale. Hazardous materials are what they are and not many people want to know that you are storing the bad stuff around. It is a fire code !

For me, I live out in the county and don't have a neighbor for 3 acres away!

ted putnam
02-02-2009, 09:54 PM
not in Fl, they can get you to put it up and have a fire suppression system, spill container, cleanup gear and the fire Marshall gets his $$, monthlys and placards for the bays, fire cabinet if applicable. notice to adjoining buildings, fire wall upgrades, NFPA, and all the things you said in triplicate, quarterly!!!

No wonder you're organic...you don't want to deal with all the BS.:laugh:

mrkosar
02-02-2009, 10:11 PM
Don't allow your fertilizers to come into contact with certain oils. The results will be catastrofic.

All of our fertilizers are kept away from our pesticides (Liquids) We place the ferts on pallets so they don't come into contact with the concrete to pull moisture. All the pesticides are stored in metal-vented enclosure babinets in my 20x30 shop building.
Make sure you have ventilation. Make sure that all the materials are labeled correctly and posted signs are visible. Have hazmat cleanup supplies, and a fire extenguisher handy. Really, you may consider consulting you local fire code and materials agencies before storing quantities of products or fertilizers. Each state will differ depending on the locale. Hazardous materials are what they are and not many people want to know that you are storing the bad stuff around. It is a fire code !

For me, I live out in the county and don't have a neighbor for 3 acres away!

thanks Think Green.

first didn't mean to come off as jerk, but it makes me angry when people attack others on here that are just asking questions to learn. too many threads turn into meaningless debates, attacks on intelligence or knowledge, and the original poster gets pounded with criticism or doesn't get an answer to his question at all. this IS a site that is meant for helping others with issues they may not have encountered.

second, i didn't ask if i needed a license to apply fertilizers. i was wondering about needing a license for storing fertilizer (straight, no pesticides). i have a pesticide business license for the place with pesticides, but didn't know about straight ferts storage. i didn't know about fertilizer ventillation, flammability, etc...and that is why i started this thread.

msds and label are not the same you are right. when i read the label, 95% of the time i'm going to read the msds too. kind of threw them together. thanks for any help guys.

what type of oils are you talking about?

treegal1
02-02-2009, 10:33 PM
dude SEARCH ampho, blasting agent, thats what type of oil:cry::nono:

turf hokie
02-03-2009, 07:59 AM
OMG, is this thread turning into a joke. There is no way you are going to blow up a building with the ferts that we use in lawn care. I dont care what kind of oil you dump on it.

The post by Treegal, while informative, is for BULK storage.
Another post says you have to keep it wrapped in plastic.

People, a 50 lb bag, no matter how many of them you store is not bulk storage and guess what, 90% of the time the fert is in a neat little plastic bag. And on a pallet to keep it off the floor.

Fire Department rules vary by county, never mind by state. Call you fire inspector. He will tell you what you need.

We needed only to provide MSDS sheets so they know what you have. Nothiing we have is considered flammable.

Oh yeah, I forgot he probably is looking to keep blasting agents around just in case he has a serious mole problem, I guess he should move that away from the tons of ammonium nitrate he keeps around for just in case they are really BIG moles:hammerhead: who has any of that stuff???

You guys are rediculous, all he asked was a simple question and cabin fever sets in, get a better hobby than the scare tactics.

ted putnam
02-03-2009, 08:42 AM
OMG, is this thread turning into a joke. There is no way you are going to blow up a building with the ferts that we use in lawn care. I dont care what kind of oil you dump on it.

The post by Treegal, while informative, is for BULK storage.
Another post says you have to keep it wrapped in plastic.

People, a 50 lb bag, no matter how many of them you store is not bulk storage and guess what, 90% of the time the fert is in a neat little plastic bag. And on a pallet to keep it off the floor.

Fire Department rules vary by county, never mind by state. Call you fire inspector. He will tell you what you need.

We needed only to provide MSDS sheets so they know what you have. Nothiing we have is considered flammable.

Oh yeah, I forgot he probably is looking to keep blasting agents around just in case he has a serious mole problem, I guess he should move that away from the tons of ammonium nitrate he keeps around for just in case they are really BIG moles:hammerhead: who has any of that stuff???

You guys are rediculous, all he asked was a simple question and cabin fever sets in, get a better hobby than the scare tactics.

Hokie, you foiled my plans...I was gonna drive by and throw an M-80 in my competition' s wharehouse full of Urea Fert and "eliminate the competition" so to speak.I was hoping it'd look something like Treegal's pic. Back to the drawing board...

Seriously. Contact your local FD. Have them "Pre-Fire Plan" your location. They just want to know what you have so they know how to plan in case of an emergency. Check with your state DOA for any additional requirements.

mrkosar
02-03-2009, 08:56 AM
omg, is this thread turning into a joke. There is no way you are going to blow up a building with the ferts that we use in lawn care. I dont care what kind of oil you dump on it.

The post by treegal, while informative, is for bulk storage.
Another post says you have to keep it wrapped in plastic.

People, a 50 lb bag, no matter how many of them you store is not bulk storage and guess what, 90% of the time the fert is in a neat little plastic bag. And on a pallet to keep it off the floor.

Fire department rules vary by county, never mind by state. Call you fire inspector. He will tell you what you need.

We needed only to provide msds sheets so they know what you have. Nothiing we have is considered flammable.

Oh yeah, i forgot he probably is looking to keep blasting agents around just in case he has a serious mole problem, i guess he should move that away from the tons of ammonium nitrate he keeps around for just in case they are really big moles:hammerhead: Who has any of that stuff???

You guys are rediculous, all he asked was a simple question and cabin fever sets in, get a better hobby than the scare tactics.

thank you!

mngrassguy
02-03-2009, 12:19 PM
Here in Minnesota, Safe handling and storage of fertilizers are basic info covered on our licensing exam, so is reading an MSDS (flammability) issues. The OP indicates he either doesn't have a license or Ohio give anybody with a warm body a license.

mrkosar
02-03-2009, 02:23 PM
Here in Minnesota, Safe handling and storage of fertilizers are basic info covered on our licensing exam, so is reading an MSDS (flammability) issues. The OP indicates he either doesn't have a license or Ohio give anybody with a warm body a license.

well you have to be the smartest individual i've ever encountered in my life. why are you spending your time in the green industry? you should be working for NASA or possibly curing cancer. it must be something in the water down here that has made me so damn stupid and lazy.

i got my license 4 years ago with a 90% on the exam. i started my company two months after that. i had done lawn care the 6 summers before that. i try to follow all regulations correctly and have never once been fined. i read labels, msds, ask questions, etc...i learn from individuals on here from their experiences. Most aren't arrogant pricks that get on here just to show how damn smart they are and talk down to others with simple questions though.

my original post asked whether fertilizer was flammable and precautions (fair question, but i guess not). i asked if i needed a separate license for storing straight fertilizer with no pesticides in them (fair question, but i guess not). i asked for suggestions or experiences that had to do with this topic. i passed my exam, started a company, got busy, and try to learn as i go on some issues. this was one of those times. my bad almighty one.

this is one warm body down in ohio asking you to please just refrain from answering any of my questions from now on. i obviously am not on your intelligence level and would not understand the complex answer you would post to my amateur questions.

mngrassguy
02-03-2009, 02:34 PM
Oh...ok:laugh::laugh::laugh:

americanlawn
02-03-2009, 04:39 PM
Each State varies, just contact your State Pesticide Division. They should be able to provide a written copy of the restrictions/requirements for free. In my State there are maximum amounts fert or pesticides that can be stored without having a retainment system -- this is probably what you're looking for. Good luck -- good question. :usflag:

i've been looking for storage the past few weeks and one guy asked me today if the fertilizer is flammable. the answer is no right? storing straight fertilizers is fine, but if it has pesticides then I need a license right?

anything i need to worry about if i were to store it in someone's garage besides them stealing fert?

Think Green
02-03-2009, 07:03 PM
MRKOSAR,
I am sorry for coming across as a harsh. I should have read more detail into your question.
It may be applicable to contact your state licensing division and converse with them on their procedures of storage. My intent wasn't to bombard you at all.
MSDS pamphlets are a reasonable source for information, however each state does regulate storage.
When it comes to Arkansas, safety in storage was on our exams through the EPA section, but so was other common sense questions. The comment I made about certain oils........well, employees do screw up and place things where they aren't supposed to be. Bags to puncture and leak!
I am new to this site but am not new to the rhelm of public forums.
I did not intend to mislead your question or to embark on a public debate.
Thank you for your response.
BE SAFE!

mrkosar
02-03-2009, 10:29 PM
Think Green

I wasn't even talking about you. I actually thought your response was good and I appreciated it. I just hate when people criticize others on this site instead of helping them. I guess a few people were beat up in high school a couple times too many and want to take it out on someone now. I appreciate everyone who is helpful. I should have known the answers to the questions I posted, but I didn't. I am learning as I go. At least I have a thirst to learn instead of the low balling bums out there that do things without asking questions not concerned with the consequences of their actions.

treegal1
02-03-2009, 11:54 PM
we get and use some( very little) ammonium nitrate from helena chem co, its the high grade stuff, almost pure, and from what the guy tells me it only took about 1200 lbs to do the Oklahoma bombing that's why and I will quote " there are tagents in the fert that ATF can track now"???? I filled out the paper work with my #s and all and got my 100 lbs and split. almost to easy????

and I always store it locked. why???? one of my idiots and a bad gas can????

morel to this story, don't be scared be aware!!!and then with that knowledge be safe.

and yes compost is easier to store, but it takes up more $pace. and yes I have to keep that from fires and run off and all the other things that regular fert has to have.

here saw this on line and it looks cool, but then again it almost seems unanimous amongst us all that call the folks that will/ can give out the fines and ask them, just to have a little piece of mind??? we have a compliance field rep that comes to us and helps us comply,nice person with tons of paper work and help to keep you straight, maybe the ag or epa web site for your state has the info.

http://www.arnatural.org/environmental_management/eqip4/fact3.htm

fear is the mind killer!!!