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View Full Version : Anyone using cement curb makers?


miller629
02-04-2009, 10:14 PM
Hi guys, im new to this site. i have a small lawn business and im thinking of expanding into landscape a little more.I love the look of curb landscape, and i have been researching some equipment and prices.But i was wondering if any of you guys have any of this equipment{such as lil bubba,curb-king,etc} and what you think of it and if it is really worth buying.

thanks in advance

paradise32258
02-06-2009, 05:13 PM
i am also intrested in seeing what people have to say about these products. seems like it could be a nice add on service.

DuallyVette
02-07-2009, 01:39 AM
I'd like to see some comments, but I don't think that it looks to good. I also would bet that it break into smaller sections over a winter or two.

BrandonV
02-07-2009, 11:55 AM
I agree, must be a reason we don't see it much up here. Likely the never ending freeze-thaw action of our winter. See tons of it in warmer climates though, you could always do a nice stone edging though.

PlatinumLandCon
02-08-2009, 12:53 AM
This site is very northern concentrated I think, thus the destruction of these curbs in winter. I think all the rebar and such to reinforce would just price the curbs out of the market if they were offered up here. I don't think there's many people setup to do that kind of work on here. Could be interesting though to see some $$ figures and if they're as good as some of the lofty claims.

DuallyVette
02-08-2009, 01:11 AM
I'm in the south. I've seen a couple of installations. I would bet, that since there's no real foundation, curbs are shalow, long and skinny, they would have to crack. I met a guy a few years ago, that was gung-ho with his new curbing business. I think he gave it up after a couple of months.

kootoomootoo
02-08-2009, 01:20 AM
There is a probably one hundred of these posts on here. The same lawn mowing guys ask the very same question every month or so. The number of franchises for sale for almost nothing and the number of equipment auctions should answer your question.

But hey concrete goes in one end and curb comes out the other. What could be easier right...

Summit L & D
02-08-2009, 03:02 AM
The problem that I'm seeing with the curbing industry is that the projected net income from the business leads guys that should never be doing it....into the business. I'm talking about guys looking to make a quick buck. However, in the south it works pretty well - from what I can tell. I am planning on picking up a used set up so that we have a lower cost edging option to provide our clients. If you spend the time to prep the base right and finish it right, I think you can provide a very nice looking, long lasting, edge.

Bru75
02-08-2009, 12:41 PM
Most paver and wall block companies have some sort of curbing block, that is what I use.
I agree that any poured concrete with a shallow footer will crack sooner or later, and I don't want to be called when it does.

DuallyVette
02-08-2009, 01:48 PM
Most paver and wall block companies have some sort of curbing block, that is what I use.
I agree that any poured concrete with a shallow footer will crack sooner or later, and I don't want to be called when it does.


As for "shallow footer", I was under the impression that they used the "no footer' method :)

STL Ponds and Waterfalls
02-08-2009, 04:33 PM
As for "shallow footer", I was under the impression that they used the "no footer' method :)

That's right! You use a sod cutter designed for the curbing which in our case was 10" wide and the curbing was 7" wide. You cut it out and pour the curbing right on the ground. If the ground seems weak we would dig out the section and tamp in a crushed stone base. The curbing will definately crack that is why you cut control joints every 18"-24" or so to control the cracking you hope. What is a concrete guarantee? It's guaranteed to crack. Different curbing mixes produce stronger or weaker concrete. We poured a colored slurry mix over our curb and DID not use integral colors. Integral coloring tends to weaken the concrete.

Curbing is not for the faint of heart! Period! Invest your money in something else that is more productive and profitable. I did it for 4 years and wish I had that money and 4 years back. Now all I do for edging is set natural stone in a bed of crete and make a ton more money and you can pause when needed and rain won't F'up your work.

Bru75
02-08-2009, 05:53 PM
As for "shallow footer", I was under the impression that they used the "no footer' method :)
You're right, what I meant was shallow.

DuallyVette
02-08-2009, 11:09 PM
I noticed an old edging job today It had come apart on the control joints ( every 12 to 18 inches). Tree roots seemed to be the main culprit.

miller629
02-09-2009, 09:02 AM
thanks guys to all that has responded....it sure has made me re consider after reading all this.I guess maybe theres a reason no one in my area has any of this equipment.Just seemed like a great idea on paper.....lol

Summit L & D
02-09-2009, 10:32 AM
That's right! You use a sod cutter designed for the curbing which in our case was 10" wide and the curbing was 7" wide. You cut it out and pour the curbing right on the ground. If the ground seems weak we would dig out the section and tamp in a crushed stone base. The curbing will definately crack that is why you cut control joints every 18"-24" or so to control the cracking you hope. What is a concrete guarantee? It's guaranteed to crack. Different curbing mixes produce stronger or weaker concrete. We poured a colored slurry mix over our curb and DID not use integral colors. Integral coloring tends to weaken the concrete.

Curbing is not for the faint of heart! Period! Invest your money in something else that is more productive and profitable. I did it for 4 years and wish I had that money and 4 years back. Now all I do for edging is set natural stone in a bed of crete and make a ton more money and you can pause when needed and rain won't F'up your work.

I can't argue with anything you posted here! I think that guys are overcharging the service. I think around 4 bucks a foot is a fair price for a colored curb. Personally I think this 12 dollars a foot that some guys charge is robbery.

STL Ponds and Waterfalls
02-09-2009, 07:34 PM
I can't argue with anything you posted here! I think that guys are overcharging the service. I think around 4 bucks a foot is a fair price for a colored curb. Personally I think this 12 dollars a foot that some guys charge is robbery.

I do disagree with this statement though.:) When I quit doing curbs 4 years ago we were charging $4.00 ft for plain curb and $8.00 on average for colored and stamped curb. This season I would have charged probably a couple bucks more per foot. Up here there is a lot more prep work than most southern places though. I was differnt though, once I started I didn't stop until dark or the run was complete. Stopping and splicing in just was a pita.

Summit L & D
02-10-2009, 01:01 AM
Fair enough.