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Captain_Morgan
02-06-2009, 11:38 AM
I have taken some pictures of the dumb things guys have done with the Z-Sprayers.

This is what happens when you don't unhook both of the straps before unloading.

No injuries but it took 2 guys to set it down with no damage and no spills.

grassman177
02-06-2009, 03:02 PM
is that a junior 36? looks older but i still did not recognize the model. damn, that is scary and funny. as long as nothing was damaged, then funny right! the fisrt time i used my max on a steep hill i get the feel for it sliding down all the way. that was scary. now i know the limits and proper usage on a hill and no problems.

cod8825
02-06-2009, 03:09 PM
I am glad that no one was hurt also but that was some funny stuff.

Captain_Morgan
02-06-2009, 03:29 PM
My 19 year old son was out servicing lawns when he called and said that he needed some help. That is what I found when I got there. It was balancing on the metal at the back of the frame so I could not just roll is backwards. I didn't want to beat him up any more than he already was doing to himself but I did have a good laugh.

That is an older model. I don't remember which one but I think it is an intermediate back when they had the smaller hopper.

ZSpray Info
02-07-2009, 10:44 PM
Things could be alot worse. We had a customer last year bring in a Z-Max that had come off his truck or trailer and literally somersaulted down the road at what he said was at least 50 mph.

Remarkably we were able to repair the unit with a brand new upright, new casters and some other items. We wish we had taken pictures.

Jason Rose
02-07-2009, 10:55 PM
Not to take this thread and skew away from the Z-spray topic, but I think the ride on spreaders in general are pretty dangerous little machines if left in unexperienced hands. Granted the likelyhood of actually injuring yourself on a machine you are standing on is slim (you can just step off and out of the way) but it happens, and happens faster than can be reacted too.

I put my Permagreen on it's nose last spring. Had about 150 lbs of product in the hopper and was traversing a small slope on the side, there was some holes and I kept loosing traction because it was dragging me on the sulkey. So I did the normal thing, pull the lever to fold the handle down and stepped off. With that much weight in the hopper, just as I stepped off one front wheel fell in a hole ond over it went. Sulkey hit me in the shin on the way, handles just pulled out of my hands. Spent the next 20 minutes trying in vein to clean up the spill with my hands. Thankfully it was not in a nice lawn, actually it was a common area in the neghiborhood I grew up in that I just treat for cheap.

grassman177
02-08-2009, 11:11 AM
i have spilled a hopper ful from a push spreader when i hit a hole and the hopper was full. i hate push spreading.

mattfromNY
02-08-2009, 11:25 AM
i have spilled a hopper ful from a push spreader when i hit a hole and the hopper was full. i hate push spreading.

Pushing a full hopper up hill, the damn 'kickstand' keeps dragging so you raise the handle, just as you do this you hit a root and bam, you're laying on the spreader w/ a kickstand to the groin and a meck of a hess all over the ground in front of you. :cry::cry:

Captain_Morgan
02-08-2009, 11:56 AM
Here is another one.

Notice how tall the grass is!!!! The tech should not have done this lawn in the first place. The lawn is very sloped and the grass was wet and he didn't have the hopper covered.
I usually don't fire workers for their first mistake but in this case I made an exception.

Nobody was injured and no material was spilled. I was lucky that time.

I give much better training now and I test all my techs judgment skills much more consistently because I know that I am responsible for the results.