PDA

View Full Version : aluminum trailers


I MOW ALONE
02-09-2009, 01:53 AM
for those of you that have them have you had any problems with the welds cracking? do you feel they are just as strong as metal? i have a 14' tandem axle and am considering a 14' aluminum single axle. i carry a 60" lazer and a 34" gravely rider you guys think the single axle will be fine as long as it is a 3500# rated axle? just dont want to buy something that will break carrying my mowers. thanks

fool32696
02-09-2009, 02:13 AM
I don't think the weight savings is worth the cost and having a trailer that won't haul as much. In a perfect world we'd all use aluminum trailers, but the cost just doesn't work out.

salopez
02-09-2009, 08:05 AM
i think the problem is that they don't bend they break. al. has no fatigue life unless you bake it first, which is $$$$

so you are going to spend more money for a delicate trailer...thats why you don't see them for com. landscape use.

sven1277
02-09-2009, 03:31 PM
I have a 6k equipment trailer. I've had some welds crack where the fenders meet the main frame. I need to have them rewelded but I haven't had any additional problems other than noticing the initial cracks.

IMAGE
02-09-2009, 04:06 PM
to the OP: Aluminum is metal.

doubleedge
02-09-2009, 06:25 PM
to the OP: Aluminum is metal.

:laugh::laugh::laugh:

I MOW ALONE
02-09-2009, 09:19 PM
to the OP: Aluminum is metal.

steel :laugh::laugh::laugh::laugh::laugh:

Jason Rose
02-09-2009, 10:49 PM
I know another guy here localy that has had an all Aluminium lawn trailer for about 7 or 8 years now. Some years ago I asked him about it and he said the same thing about it breaking in places and being expensive to fix because not everyone has the tools and skill to weld it. He's still using it though, and it still looks decent from a distance.

I really don't see how the weight difference between steel and alum. can be great enough to effect fuel useage or truck wear and tear. Only plus I see is that it never needs paint!

dishboy
02-09-2009, 11:22 PM
to the OP: Aluminum is metal.

But steel is real!

I MOW ALONE
02-10-2009, 12:27 AM
well i think im just going to keep what i got. i just think the aluminum looks better is lighter should save a little fuel every little bit helps. i was going to get a pretty decent deal as far as price goes. but i dont want the headache. thanks for the replies

AtoZ
02-10-2009, 11:31 AM
I had a 12 foot Aluma trailer for about 4 years before a girl rear-ended it and totaled it. I used it to haul around my Kubota RTV. It was great to be able to use a couple fingers and push it around and hook it up. Never had weld problems or cracking issues - I'm not the easiest on stuff but I take care of them. Never needs paint - the only issue I found that was lacking on mine was rear jack stands. I fabbed some up with wood and used them when loading the Kubota. Other than that absolutely loved the Aluma. In fact I will be buying another one this year if everything goes well.

Only recommendation would be to buy a name brand trailer like Aluma or Featherlite to name a few - No cheap knockoffs!!!

sven1277
02-14-2009, 11:23 AM
I went with aluminum for 2 reasons. Sometimes I trailer after a snow storm. Also, the 500lb weight savings allows me to legally carry my skid. I was that close.

topsites
02-15-2009, 06:04 AM
1. Not all aluminum trailers are made of all aluminum, some have wooden floors making
them hardly any lighter, thou they are a little cheaper.

2. A true, all aluminum 6x12 single axle w/ 2 foot high sides: $3,000

3. The weight of a 6x12 steel is about 1,500 pounds, the same full aluminum trailer
weighs around 6-700, this is for a nice 6x12 with decent 2 foot high sides...
With lesser trailers the weight difference is smaller.

4. Aluminum is welded the same way copper or brass pipe and radiators are welded,
with a mapp torch and solder, it is a pita process.

5. Few dealers, very few, closest one to me is 1-200 miles away.

LindblomRJ
02-15-2009, 06:14 AM
Aluminum is nice when you have a larger loads. But for two mowers and the size stick with steel. I doubt you would see much savings in weight, fuel consumption and maintainence.

Jason Rose
02-15-2009, 10:47 AM
Well, you know Aluminium has it's benifits. Look at most all semi trailers. Usually they are aluminium. I'd imigine the weight savings there is immense, and the more load they can haul the more money they save per trip. I think for those just towing a normal trailer around town, the aluminium isn't going to save you much of anything for the weight difference. But for long hauling it would be great. Especially when dead-headding back to pick up another load. For a driver like that, even a .25 mpg savings would add up.

LindblomRJ
02-15-2009, 01:31 PM
A aluminum flatbed semi trailer will weigh anywhere from 9000 to 12000 pounds compared to 18 to 20K for a steel trailer. More payload = more money

GravelyNut
02-15-2009, 02:46 PM
1. Not all aluminum trailers are made of all aluminum, some have wooden floors making
them hardly any lighter, thou they are a little cheaper.

2. A true, all aluminum 6x12 single axle w/ 2 foot high sides: $3,000

3. The weight of a 6x12 steel is about 1,500 pounds, the same full aluminum trailer
weighs around 6-700, this is for a nice 6x12 with decent 2 foot high sides...
With lesser trailers the weight difference is smaller.

4. Aluminum is welded the same way copper or brass pipe and radiators are welded,
with a mapp torch and solder, it is a pita process.

5. Few dealers, very few, closest one to me is 1-200 miles away.

When was the last time you saw one built by #4? A properly built Al trailer will be TIG or MIG built. Never soldered in any way. Both methods use electric current to heat the metal, not a flammable gas. Both use sheilding gases to prevent oxides from forming. TIG welding is the prefered method and uses the torch with a tungsten electrode to heat the Al base metal and filler rod while sheilded by an inert gas. MIG uses the filler to heat the base and filler metal while sheilded by an inert gas. The gas can be He, Ar, or a mix.

IMAGE
02-15-2009, 03:52 PM
1. Not all aluminum trailers are made of all aluminum, some have wooden floors making
them hardly any lighter, thou they are a little cheaper.

2. A true, all aluminum 6x12 single axle w/ 2 foot high sides: $3,000

3. The weight of a 6x12 steel is about 1,500 pounds, the same full aluminum trailer
weighs around 6-700, this is for a nice 6x12 with decent 2 foot high sides...
With lesser trailers the weight difference is smaller.

4. Aluminum is welded the same way copper or brass pipe and radiators are welded,
with a mapp torch and solder, it is a pita process.

5. Few dealers, very few, closest one to me is 1-200 miles away.


haha umm NOOO!!!

Mig welding is by far the most common form of aluminum welding, and it is the industry standard. Tig welding is less common on trailers, it is usually reserved for items like hand railings and parts that get touched or handled alot.

As to soldering aluminum... yeah you go do that with your torch and tell me how long it takes you to get aluminum to puddle...

BTW people. Aluminum trailers are not weak. You can buy them for any rating you want, all the way from a little ATV trailer, to a Low Boy Heavy Hauler. Obviously just like when buying a steel trailer you get what you pay for. I have seen some VERY nice aluminum skid steer trailers with 14,000 lb ratings and I bet they will outlast a steel trailer of the same rating, not to mention how nice they look.

mybowtie
02-15-2009, 06:17 PM
I paid $3200 for my 16' dual axle alum trailer in 07. I have had some welds break on the raling...But its my own damm fault..I would run the first mower up to the rail and give it a "tap". I mounted a pro locker for the 2nd mower to far forward, and the first mower needs to be touching the rail..

My steel trailers fenders rotted out in 3 seasons..Trailer was never used in the winter.

This will be my 3rd season with the alum..still looks new.....:usflag: