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Surferbum21
02-09-2009, 06:19 PM
...for asking this question. i have searched and researched and researched some more. I am trying to learn about fert & squirt programs. I just took the test (2 weeks sooner than i thought I was going to and made an 80 on the CORE and Ornamental tests). I submitted all my paperwork to get my license and am in the process of getting a spray rig and a spreader.

What I need help on is I have no idea what to do once I am set up. I am located in central Oklahoma. I know most co's are offering 6 application programs but what is involved? When do you do each application? Is each application the same for all lawns during that time? What chemicals are used? why do i see some people doing granular fert n others liquid fert? what can be combined with each other? what should I steer away from?

I am starting slow into these to get a grasp of things and to make sure I do a good job. I don't want to get overwhelmed with work and not do the work right. I have 80 lawn accounts and am really only marketing to them at the moment. I kind of have a grasp on what to charge but will hopefully get more of a feel for it quickly. Any info and advice is greatly appreciated.

VARMIT COMMISSION
02-09-2009, 06:35 PM
WOW! You got some big balls. Your gunna get stoned by all the "my chit don't stink" I'm a seasoned pro , read the label, I know but I ain't gunna tell, I figured it out so can you guy's!

srl28
02-09-2009, 06:45 PM
Where in that post did he seem to have any "big balls" comments? I'm confused.

Anyways, surferbum21, congrats on your test and all. In just about the same boat as you, maybe a little ahead of you but I had some luck at least getting info and a start at my local John Deere Landscapes Dealer, they recently aquired lesco. The reps want to help you, the more landscapers who buy their stuff the better they do and if they set you up and get you started then they of course will do well, so play that game. Its free information, whether everyone here agrees with that or not. If your wise enough to take all the info you can, sort through it and find whats good, bad, and ugly than you ll succeed.

Get in touch with a local JDL supply place and see if they can help you out. Check out other local companies programs, they may be advertised or just call them and ask as a homeowner what the average package includes. See what they say. Just need to find as much info as possible and weed through it all, get what you can out of it and start from there.

LawnTamer
02-09-2009, 06:48 PM
I had a big rock ready! But the truth is that if I hadn't been an applicator for another company for a few years before I went out on my own, I would have been lost too.

Here are some questions for you.

How big is the average lawn in the areas you want to be working in?

How do you want to position yourself? By this I mean, do you want to be the one size fits all, low end, high end?

How many clients do/will you have?

What is your budget?

There are reasons I ask, not just trying to bust you up.

If you will answer those questions, it will help us a lot in putting together a good program.

daveyo
02-09-2009, 06:52 PM
I would go down to a local dealer and talk to one of the reps there. Do you know who your supplier is going to be? They'll be more than happy to help you. You can even call your local extension center if you have one. Application time, quantity and over all health of the grass are some factors to consider. Hopefully you can recognize some weeds and stress causes of your customers lawns already. If not study up on weed id and germination times of those weeds, when do certain weeds thrive and when is the best time to apply any herbicides if any. When is the best time to water, how much water is needed for each particular lawn. Each customer of mine has the same basic program, just slightly tweaked if needed.

Whitey4
02-09-2009, 07:28 PM
I am a bit surprised you could pass the test and still have so many questions.

First, sure, talking to a supplier is great, but why not join your local LCO/Pesticide association? They can supply you with a lot of this sort of info, targeted towards your region of the country.

As mentioned... how large are your properties? How many customers? Do you have a business plan or are you just winging the whole thing? Seeing what sticks to the wall?

I am still learning, but don't be looking for any silver plate to replace doing some independent research and work of your own. Even if someone told you what to do, you still need to know why.

grenskpr
02-09-2009, 07:37 PM
I gotta agree with varmit.. what they teach you at that there pesticide class?now that yur edicated get out there and git you some bisness.

Seriously, this seems to be the problem in alot of states. I have a turf degree and all these Johnny come latelys think they can make lots of money on the spray side it just belittles our profession. Everythings fine until you have problems or misapply and don't have a clue how to fix. Just my .02

John

Surferbum21
02-09-2009, 08:03 PM
well the reason I am able to pass the test and still have questions is b/c the books are just that. They tell you what you need to know (book smarts) but don't actually tell you how to do it (street smarts). What I am stressed about is competing with other companies for customer's business. How are their programs put together? For instance, I know stage I is pre-emergence but have seen so many different chemicals you can use or mix together with others. The sheet I was given isn't broken done very well as it only shows 3 applications needed and I see others offer 6 applications. Are applications just every 2 months (12mo/6apps) to keep an eye on things and take care of as needed? Like go in Feb/March and do Pre-emerg...April/May Post-emerg...June/July fert n spot spray...Aug/Sep...fert n spot spray...Oct/Nov winterizer...Dec/Feb???

I have an acquantance I will try and see if he'll let me go on a ride-along to see how things are done and will call several local companies and act like customer to see what they offer and prices.

Sorry if this thread was bothersome but I like to make sure I cover all my basis and learn as much as possible before doing something. I like to do stuff right the first time as my father taught me. I want to make a name for myself and do a good job building a reputation. Not make a quick and easy buck. Thanks for the input guys

MnLefty
02-09-2009, 09:12 PM
Sorry if this thread was bothersome but I like to make sure I cover all my basis and learn as much as possible before doing something. I like to do stuff right the first time as my father taught me. I want to make a name for myself and do a good job building a reputation. Not make a quick and easy buck. Thanks for the input guys

Surferbum- I'm not trying to "pile on" here, and I don't mean this with any ill will, but the questions you're asking could be construed to many here as taking the easy way out. You're asking questions like what products to use, what can be mixed, how many apps etc... when you should really be doing your homework in a turf textbook or other resources learning the fundamentals of turf management so you can decide for yourself what products to use and when... Could you get programs from here and go out and do just fine? Probably... but at some point you're going to have to answer intelligently when a customer asks why. The search button and google should be your best friends for awhile, like I said, getting a turf education, not just finding a program. Start by exploring the links provided...

http://www.ksuturf.com/
http://www.turf.okstate.edu/

Again, not trying to be a jerk. It's just that you're asking for information that guys here have spent money and/or time learning through schooling or experience or both. I know you're trying to do your own research, but you're asking how when you should be asking why.

grenskpr
02-09-2009, 09:32 PM
MnLefty.. well said

mrkosar
02-09-2009, 09:56 PM
smart thread title. very good advice so far. go to JDL dealer because they will help you with everything if they are anything like mine. read past threads, read books, ride alongs, call competitors and get estimates, read some more, and then learn as you go. you will make mistakes and will encounter several things per day that you have no idea. be truthful with customers and follow up with answers to their questions after finding them out. use lawnsite because most on here will help you without criticism. develop relationships with seasoned pros willing to help. they will be vital in finding solutions to problems you don't know how to fix because they have seen the problem a hundred times already. no reason to invent the wheel. network to the point you have 4-5 LCO's you can go to, so you don't bother one or two with tons of questions.

most basic programs will be 4-6 apps, but the different products and rates used will vary depending on customer expectations, # of apps, type of product, etc..

use granular ferts, liquid post herbs, most use combo granular premergent fert for first app.

a great book i found helpful was "Turfgrass Management". push proper cultural practices as much as possible and good luck.

VARMIT COMMISSION
02-09-2009, 10:02 PM
Lesco was very helpfull when I first started. There is one in Edmond. Go up there and talk to Rick. Lesco also has a breakdown on chemicals and timing like Estes does. Just ask for a copy and look it over. It is easier to understand than the Estes sheet. Lesco is limited on chemicals, Estes has everything made. Well almost.

ted putnam
02-09-2009, 10:05 PM
Aw hell, get Varmit to take you under his wing(since you're both in OKC) Then, when you've learned everything you can from him, swipe his customers....just kidding.

Excellent advice has come from several. Use all sources of information available. Start at Lesco/JDL. They can give you a basic program to follow. They'll give you the when, what and why to use. It'll be up to you to tweek it. Go online and dig for info and find some good Turf books. Something with good info and lots of pictures pertaining to the turf types you treat.They will give you good info on cultural practices and the pics will help you ID problems(insects, diseases, etc...) you will encounter later. Last but not least, use your local extension office. They are a wealth of information and help, especially when all else fails. Good Luck

sevenbarefootlawns
02-09-2009, 10:29 PM
Surfer, This is all good advice but until you get out there and get your hands dirty you wont know. I've found that when it comes down to it the science is never going to change but peoples opinions always differ. What I mean is that everyone stands by the product that they use but there is a reason why there are so many different options out there. Do some research and pick your products but don't be afraid to mix it up. You can listen to what everybody says and read every book out there but until you see effects first hand you never really know. The best motivator and teacher is the first time you stripe a lawn, smoke some edges, wilt someones shrubs, etc. and when you spend the time and money to fix it I guarantee you wont do it again. (IMO) Trial By Fire Baby!! Thats how I learned and I wouldn't have it any other way:drinkup:

quiet
02-09-2009, 10:46 PM
The only thing I'll add is to start with your county extension service first. They'll give you info on suggested timing and rates for the turfgrasses in your area.

THEN research on your own with the idea of formulating a plan, THEN contact several suppliers.

ted putnam
02-09-2009, 10:58 PM
The only thing I'll add is to start with your county extension service first. They'll give you info on suggested timing and rates for the turfgrasses in your area.

THEN research on your own with the idea of formulating a plan, THEN contact several suppliers.

True, the problem with going to a supplier first (even though they'll have a basic program formulated for your area) is that because they are a supplier, it is their job to sell you product. Overzealous salesmen(not that all are) can tell you that you need something when in actuality it's something that will work but is not necessary to get the job done. Quiet is right. Visit with your county extension office first.

brizine
02-09-2009, 11:20 PM
No offense varmit, but DO NOT go talk to Rick. He is one of those salesmen. UAP, estes(OKC), or JDLandscapes in norman will be are as good as any here local. Helena in El reno is ok also.

LawnTamer
02-09-2009, 11:31 PM
Ahh, come on guys, be honest. Most of us didn't have a resource like lawnsite when we started out, but if we had, we would have tried the same thing. I would have! Think about all the mistakes I could have saved myself by asking a couple of questions. Maybe I would have looked stupid, but who cares, if my clients would have gotten a better product and I would have not wasted time or money.

I'll give ya'll an example. When I had just struck out on my own, I had 2 sources I trusted; 1. Stuff I had learned from my old boss. 2. My supplier. Man, some of the products that guy unloaded on me:laugh::laugh:
He sold me some Mexican MSMA called Bueno, it was labeled for EVERYTHING! I asked him, will this really kill all these weeds? He told me it would and it was great stuff, and he wouldn't be able to get anymore. I bought a couple cases. Now, apart from the fact that I could have saved myself a ton of money, and not lost a bunch of clients by going 3 weeks using an ineffective herbicide. I nearly killed myself doing the compatibility test with Bueno and 3-way.... evidently they more or less explode when mixed. :laugh::laugh::laugh:

Now, if I would have had a resource like this, I could have asked about the effectiveness of Mexican MSMA.

Surferbum, here is what I would do.

1. Answer those questions I asked you. It really will help us, help you. If you only have 6 lawns and they are 4-5k ea. then you don't want to buy a Z-spray, or a 300 gal skid. You just need a decent spreader and a backpack sprayer.

2. Talk to us, talk to your suppliers and talk to your local ag extension. You won't get the perfect advice from any one of these groups, but if you talk to all three, you will get a pretty good idea. Ag extensions give good advice so far as plant health is concerned, but they know little about your bottom line and what you can realistically spend and still be competitive and profitable. You may get a pretty good program from your supplier, but that is hit and miss too. I have a friend who was just like you, he went to Lesco and walked out with a 300gal skid sprayer custom built on a dual axle trailer... a decent set-up, but not for a guy with 12 clients, totaling about an acre and a half. He never paid for the sprayer....ended up selling it at a loss.

I get a copy of the recommended program from my Lesco every year, just to see if they change it, they don't. It is not a very good program, basically built off an old Chemlawn model, lots of 46-0-0, fe and 3-way.

Anyway, talk to your suppliers, who knows, you may get something good.

Whitey4
02-10-2009, 12:04 AM
This thread ought to get pinned for the "new guys". Some solid advice here.

As mentioned, you will make some mistakes... just make sure they are small ones, not buying a spray rig you will never be able to pay off for instance. You have to do some local research... what does Trugreen and Scotts charge in your area? What about the local companies?

My first year I used Barricade for my pre-m. This year I will again, but follow up with a pendi app in June for badly infested lawns.

In general, plan on 4 ferts, at least a spring weed control, spot spraying with glyphosate (if you don't know what that is, you MUST find out and the search button is your friend) Google can send you to turf studies for anything from herbicide effectiveness to fungicides to insect control and darn near anything else. It's more than just what to use, it's how to diagnose, knowing when to treat and knowing what will work.

You need to shop and find out what your local prices will be. You need in short, to study yer buns off, and then go out there, learn some more, study some more, do more research, go out and get more experience... it is a process, not a destination. I use my backyard for new controls I never used before. My front yard is PERFECT, but my backyard is my laboratory. I test ACCLAIM, MSMA, Speedzone, Sedge Hammer, whatever. I try different mix ratios and combinations, always in compliance with the labels. Seeing results (and turf damage) always trumps reading about them.

Lesco will likely set you up with a passable program, but also as mentioned, some salesman might look at you and see a commission check to unload unsellable stock as an added bonus.

I started last year, and might now know half of what I need to know, and I have absolutely busted my nuts to learn as much as I know now. I'm also glad I went with backpack sprayers and spreaders. I might need a skid down the road, but not yet, I'd be bankrupt if I had gone that way.

There is no silver platter. It takes effort and time, and a lot of it.

EagleLandscape
02-10-2009, 12:42 AM
Look to Ewing for chemicals and seed though. I just now figured out I've been paying 30% more at JDL, Lesco. I also have the best pricing there, and I am still getting killed on pricing. Going to switch to Ewing this year for all of my chemical and rye grass seed needs. This will definately help in a tight economy, and help to combat already high fert prices.

Surferbum21
02-10-2009, 12:47 AM
thanks everyone for your input. i am researching everywhere which is why i also posted on here. I am trying to get as much information b/c I don't believe in a thing called "TMI". I am making my way downt the right path and can't wait to get my hands dirty. What I am wondering though is wouldn't the smart thing to get a spray rig? I have 2 backpack sprayers I have always used for roundup but don't think I wanna be bakpack spraying all these yards. I have found a coulple of used sprayers for $2k or less and don't mind paying the money for a good one. I know someone starting out shouldn't invest too much money in this but I have 80 potential customers already. I just don't want piss them off and will go the extra mile to make sure they are satisfied.

ted putnam
02-10-2009, 01:06 AM
A spray rig would definitely save you a lot of time. if you have or can get the money at this time, I would recommend a skid unit. You can find some good deals on a used unit depending on where you are. Just check it out and make sure it's working OK before you lay the money down. It may seem like a little overkill depending on how many customers you get to start but it'll save you so much time and you'll grow into it.

Surferbum21
02-10-2009, 01:23 AM
Here are some questions for you.

How big is the average lawn in the areas you want to be working in? 5k to 10k...and would love to do really big stuff in later years (obviously)

How do you want to position yourself? By this I mean, do you want to be the one size fits all, low end, high end? High end...I hate lowballers. I'm lucky enough now that I've been in the mowing aspect for awhile that I don't have to deal with cheapies anymore. but obvsiously want to be competitive

How many clients do/will you have? I'm sure I'll have at least 40 including my 2 big commercial accounts

What is your budget? whatever it takes. But not like a $40k spray truck. This is an investment (which will def pay off) so it does not hurt me to buy a $3k rig or good equipment. Not worried about making money to "pay off" equipment. I just bought $3k worth of lawn equipment last week if that tells answers your question.

Whitey4
02-10-2009, 01:29 AM
I agree with Ted... if you have large properties and think you can sign that many customers... a spray rig makes a lot of sense, or a skid might carry you for a while.

That whole thing about Roundup in a backpack is nonsense. Having said that, I do use a dedicated sprayer for it, but a thorough cleaning works fine. It saves cleaning time to have a dedicated backpack for glyphosate, but you can use that backpack sprayer for other things as long as it get cleaned very thoroughly.

80 customers? Sounds like you have the maintenance customer base to buy what you need, like a skid or a spray rig. I did not... small properties, not nearly that customer base. Each business is different, and location makes a huge difference. I can treat 4k of turf faster with a backpack than I could with a skid, and that is my customer profile.... not a lot of turf.

STRINGALATION
02-10-2009, 11:19 AM
hey whitey thta is a thought because i'm studying right now for my license and cert.

and i thought that i could get away with doing the lawns i get with my backpack.
i do have an apartment complex in the working but i have a nice rental place here where i can get a ride on sspreader sprayer.

now as far as the topic i'm early in my reading but his questions concerrned me. i have all intensions on getting certed for understanding, a number for my truck and from what i read so far you cannot buy the good stuff with out a number but his questions confused me. the reference to the size of lawns and stuff. i know from basics that you calculate the size inrelation to the mount applied. and the granular over spray. but casara sara. good luck buddy. to me the hardest thig to grasp at this point is pricing but i think its like everything else what does it cost and how much do i need to make. godd luck and congradulations on being professional. from what i think i know a licensed applicator will have a number on his truck and where over boots and goggles whish means most squirting here are not legitamate so glad and hope to be amongst the pro myself. why that was long winded i must be catching TOPSITISM
LLOLOLO.

Ric
02-10-2009, 11:20 AM
I am a bit surprised you could pass the test and still have so many questions.


Yo

My chit sinks and I am still learning but I am still going to throw Boulders at the SYSTEM. Every other trade or profession requires some sort of on job training or Apprenticeship before sitting for the Journeymans test. Why is it that any fool can walk into a State office and sit for a certification test to spray toxic chemicals on homes and commercial building where very young to old live and work or go to school???

Second question is. WHY is it so easy for these same inexperienced fool to pass these tests to give them licenses to spray these toxic chemicals???

Third Question is, why do the Green Tree Huggers think organic chemicals are less toxic when it fact they pollute as much if not more in many cases???

BTW In my own State where there is a 3 year requirement before testing, We still have a boat lot of Fools with out a clue. These are former employees of TG/CL or companies like them that only teach high pressure sales techniques. Forget any real agronomy training, because they have a Fool proof system where chemicals are mixed at the office and pumped on to the truck. These fools can spray for 30 years and never mix the first chemical.

PS Text books can be purchased on Amazon at costs cheaper than college book stores. There are several on line classes that teach Lawn Care. Prude and Georgia Tech come to mind as both being very good.

Sorry I just had to vent my frustration.

tlg
02-10-2009, 11:40 AM
The system certainly is flawed. Anyone with reasonable intelligence ( walk and chew gum at the same time) if they study hard enough can pass ( get 70%) any state pesticide exam. Passing a test WILL NOT make you an applicator. Hands on training can only do that. It seems to me if any given state Ag Dept. really wanted to do their job and assess someones ability the potential applicator should demonstrate some form of ability through a field test. Think about it. you can't get a drivers license without a road test. For anybody that is just getting started I would suggest finding a mentor to show you the ropes ( pay him or her if you have to) if anything to build your confidence. Using your customers as a training ground to gain your experience is a catastrophe waiting to happen.

Surferbum21
02-10-2009, 11:59 AM
The system certainly is flawed. Anyone with reasonable intelligence ( walk and chew gum at the same time) if they study hard enough can pass ( get 70%) any state pesticide exam. Passing a test WILL NOT make you an applicator. Hands on training can only do that. It seems to me if any given state Ag Dept. really wanted to do their job and assess someones ability the potential applicator should demonstrate some form of ability through a field test. Think about it. you can't get a drivers license without a road test. For anybody that is just getting started I would suggest finding a mentor to show you the ropes ( pay him or her if you have to) if anything to build your confidence. Using your customers as a training ground to gain your experience is a catastrophe waiting to happen.

I couldn't agree more! The tests were so easy that even if I didn't study I would have passed. Mult. choice and true false? Process of elimination and common sense can get anyone a license. That is why I am doing what I am doing to get TMI. I don't want to buy a rig and chemicals and just start shooting away. I want to know every aspect of every little thing.

Whitey4
02-10-2009, 01:28 PM
The system certainly is flawed. Anyone with reasonable intelligence ( walk and chew gum at the same time) if they study hard enough can pass ( get 70%) any state pesticide exam. Passing a test WILL NOT make you an applicator. Hands on training can only do that. It seems to me if any given state Ag Dept. really wanted to do their job and assess someones ability the potential applicator should demonstrate some form of ability through a field test. Think about it. you can't get a drivers license without a road test. For anybody that is just getting started I would suggest finding a mentor to show you the ropes ( pay him or her if you have to) if anything to build your confidence. Using your customers as a training ground to gain your experience is a catastrophe waiting to happen.

This is a re-hash, but a lot depends on what state you are talking about. The NYS test was NOT so easy as all that. I had to attend a 30 hour class, and I put in another 80 to 90 hours of study time. I am a good test taker, and I got a 90 on the tests. Connecticut is more difficult than NY. The pass rate in NY is about 50%.

I would say the test made me a "safe" applicator, but not a good one. What they do in NY does teach a person how to identify and treat the most common turf problems and some ornamental problems as well. They discuss all of the most important points about fert and pesticides.

Not all of the questions were this hard, but I do remember this one: "how many generations in a growing season can the birch leaf miner produce?" There were quite a few questions on how to ID pests and when to treat. We had a Cornell Emptomolgy PhD teach for 8 hours in that class.

It sounds like some states are ridiculous... where they let you just keep retaking the test until you pass. In NY, fail and it's at least a 3 month wait to retest and they have several different versions... you don't get the same test twice. Then there is always the DEC audit. But that is another thing... designed to make sure applicators are not posing a danger and have some clue as to the target pest and when,what and how much pesticide was applied. I've been told to expect an audit soon for last year's apps.

STRINGALATION
02-10-2009, 02:05 PM
sorry but my state seems to be real lax. i see things here guys else where say would never fly. we dont inspect nothing. i see trailer loaded like the beverly hill billies and guys in shorts squirting. i cannot think of a truck that has an applicators license on it.
maybe that is not a requirement.

grenskpr
02-10-2009, 02:46 PM
Ric

I hate to correct you but it is The University of Georgia,not Tech, that has the great turf school, I recieved my degree from them. They also have a good home study certificate program, that I have my techs take, the final tests are monitored by a college instructor.
Go Dawgs!

John

LawnTamer
02-10-2009, 03:37 PM
OK surferbum, here is what I would recommend. You will get other recommendations, but here is mine.

You want to be high end, right? So you will want to set yourself apart from the competition. I would build a program using mostly granular fertilizers. This allows you to use slow-release feedings. So, I would recommend buying a good spreader.

I like the Spyker model 75. Some guys here will no doubt mock it, but you can blast through 5-10K lawns fast. You won't make near as much mess and it is easy to use. I can easily treat 300k/day with one of these. If your average lawn size is 7.5k that would be all 40 of your lawns. Now, I don't know anything about your routing, or how tight your routes are, but my lawns average about 6k and I can easily do 50 in a day, if I am just doing fert. Whoopassonthebluegrass gets beat up a lot for claiming to have done 90 in a day with one of these, but truth is, I have no doubt he has. I have done 84 in a day.

If you intend on going after more bigger props, I would get something bigger in a push spreader, but for little lawns, I can usually have them done by the time it takes a tech to get a push spreader off the back and load it, and a push spreader, even with a deflector makes a mess.

As far as equipment, I would consider buying a skid sprayer. You will need to calibrate it, and learn how to use it, but the seller should be able to help you. I worked for a high end company that didn't use skid sprayers, so when I bought mine, I had literally never used one. My Lesco rep taught me how to spray with it, calibrate it, clean it etc. It took some practice. I measured out 1k on my cul-de-sac and just kept practicing with water, till I had it right.

A skid will be a big investment for 40 clients, but if you are serious about growing, it will give you a huge advantage, even though you won't use it a lot.

Here is an idea of a program that may work for you, those who are closer to your geographically can chime in with better advice.

Round 1
Mar/Apr
fert, plus prodiamine (barricade) applied at the 90 day rate
walk the edges with your backpack sprayer and catch those early weeds.

Round 2
May
Liquid fert, N, K, and fe. The fe gives you a darker color, add to this fert blend more barricade (by adding more, you can get 180-200 days of pre-em coverage), and add 3-way. This will kill most of your broadleaf weeds, and May is a good time to do this.

Round 3
June
Slow release fert blend, (I have had good luck with 32-3-8 and a 24-5-10, 30-50% slow release) spot spray weeds with backpack (between the barricade and the 3-way there shouldn't be many). Use something like momentum fx.

Round 4
Late July/early Aug
Same as 3, consider using a slightly different blend

Round 5
September
If you are seeing a lot of weeds repeat round 2 except don't add the barricade. If you are not seeing weed pressure, repeat rounds 3 & 4.

Round 6 Late Oct/early Nov
Winterizer fert.

Now, the big hole in my program is insect control. I have NO IDEA what kind of insect pressure you will have there.

Good luck, get to your suppliers and ag extension soon. Spring will be here before you know it, and you have a ton of work to do.

Ric
02-10-2009, 07:33 PM
Ric

I hate to correct you but it is The University of Georgia,not Tech, that has the great turf school, I recieved my degree from them. They also have a good home study certificate program, that I have my techs take, the final tests are monitored by a college instructor.
Go Dawgs!

John

Grenskpr

No Problem. Never said I was perfect. CRS is getting more common in my old age.

Lawn Tamer

I will agree with the granular Slow release program as being the best for both the environment and a Fine Lawn. My take is the first year don't look to make a high margin. Instead look to do top notch work to build a reputation. The long run is the sure run.

1.2.3. green
02-10-2009, 07:58 PM
Like when i was in the service, went through all the high-tech expensive schooling to learn how to fix fighter jets. Get to the squadron and the first thing they ask me was .. Do you remember what they taught you in school? I replied yes sir ! He said good now forget it.:confused:

sevenbarefootlawns
02-10-2009, 09:47 PM
1.2.3.'s got it right. Until you see it and do it for your self it doesn't matter how much you studied everything looks different. Here in good old N.H.I had to put in five years before I could even sit in on the test and we still have some knuckle heads posing as turf pros. I think its great that a guy like Surfer is at least making an effort to learn and if I had more time on my hands I'd probably spill what little knowledge I've got. As a guy that reads more then posts I feel like this is the guy we need to help educate because he is obviously trying to do the right thing even though he knows he's gonna get some heat. Personally I'm much more afraid of the guy that makes no effort and just presses on doing all the wrong things in turn killing our rep. Just my $.02 :drinkup:

okcfire
02-10-2009, 09:57 PM
Hey surfer you really need to take the advice of LawnTamer. Then I will not have any more competition here in Oklahoma.

Just kidding.

I am a big fan of the companies trying to get your business. Ewing and UAP in this area actually act like they want my business. I will not use 100s of gallons of product a year and they still act like they will help me out. Ewing does not carry all the products I like. UAP is who I will do business this year.
Buying a pallet of fert at a time will make any sales guy pay more attention then loading 10 bags in your truck.

Where are you going to concentrate your business, what type of grass will you be treating.

If you do one pre-emerge in the early Spring you will be out of business by Sep. with Crab.

You will start using a very generic program and be %80 successful and remember those other yards is your classroom. I always told my clients that if I was not happy with there yards then they would not pay. It hurt a couple of times but I have been fired only twice in the first 5 years. Remember if it is not working to get a soil sample fast. You can send those in at Lesco and they will give you results in a couple of weeks. Around here I have had many yards go acidic on me and Lime with my fert made all the difference in the world. Also last couple of years I sprayed broad fungicide on a couple of yards that had probs. and it was incredible. Dont be afraid to take a shovel to look for grubs.

In Oklahoma where you will probably spray full aps 3 times in a year you have to have a spray rig. and a good spreader.

Explain that nut grass is not controlled by pre-emerge and that treatment of this weed will cost extra.

I am glad to have a private applicator who cares enough to ask for help in the area if I can be of any help I sure will.

Dustin
All-Turf