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View Full Version : Ideal tool kit for lighting


designer1
02-11-2009, 03:59 PM
We are looking to expand into outdoor lighting and are putting together our list of tools and supplies for the upcoming season.

I would like to ask the experts and experienced, what would consider the must haves in your tool kit for covering installs and maintenance.

We have dabled in the past with lighting but now want to be able to handle any situation that may arise concerning lighting.

So, what do you consider the must have on the job site?


Thanks for any replies!

NightLightingFX
02-11-2009, 04:58 PM
The first thing I would recomend is to go to a seminar put on by one of the respected manufactures on how to properly install low voltage outdoor lighting. Respected manufatures that come to mind that do seminars: Kichler, Unique, & Nightscaping. Guys what are some other resources?

By doing that you establish yourself as being a serious outdoor lighting professional dedicated to installing quality outdoor lighting systems.

designer1
02-11-2009, 05:49 PM
Thanks Ned,

Already signed up for Kichler and Unique training seminars. Thinking about Cast and maybe Hadco.

Thats why I asked about the tool kit that would put me into the "serious" catagory.

INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting
02-11-2009, 06:14 PM
My goodness... where to begin?! I suppose with the necessary hand tools. Diagonal cutters, Auto-Strippers, One of each type of screwdriver, mallet, cordless drill, auto ranging digital clamp on ammeter/multimeter, and on and on and on.

I use a fully equipped 6x12 trailer for my installations and would be lost without the $20K of tools that it contains! Hammer Drils, Core Drils, Pry Bars, Hand Saws, Hack Saws, Hammers, Wrenches, Socket Set, Power Drill, Router, Sawzall, Circular Saw, Belt Sander, Disc Sander, Bench Vise, Picks, Shovels, Spades, Cleanout Shovels, Trenching Shovels, Hard Rakes, Fan Rakes, Brooms, Pruning Saws, Screw Drivers, Drill Bit Sets, Auger Bits, Levels. There is more of course I just can't remember it all sitting here in Jamaica! :)

Any of the training seminars will get you started, but you will quickly finding yourself investing in a lot of tools as your installations get more complex and 'custom'.

Regards.

NightLightingFX
02-11-2009, 06:16 PM
-Fluke meter is probably the most important tool
-Wire cutters etc.
-Buccanan crimper
-Leatherman is handy
-Your basic tools-screwdriver etc.
-power tools-drill, saw etc.
-I have a work trailer
Thinking what is in my trailer
-Shovel
-Spade
-trench shovel
-Sidewalk Sleever
-post hole digger
-Little Giant ladder
It is pretty much the obvious things you would expect. Someone else may have more ideas.

INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting
02-11-2009, 06:29 PM
Oh how could I forget? LADDERS! Lets see... 6',8',12' Step Ladders, 24', 2x32', 40' extension ladders, a 2 step and a 3 step positioning ladder.

designer1
02-11-2009, 06:56 PM
YIKES!

You guys are SERIOUS! LOL

First off, thanks for the replies.

I should have been more specific. We already do full service landscaping services, ie design, install,maintain.

We have several horticulturist on staff who do design and help with installation.

Last year we started doing irrigation, so now we are breaking into lighting as to offer everything from one source for our customers.

We don't "mow and blow" just design and install.

I have always been drawn to outdoor lighting and am trying to learn all I can to make sure my guys can offer quality lighting as well as everything else.

Eventually, I foresee a trailer just for lighting, but for now, I was wondering about lighting specific tools: ohms meter,etc.

Thanks again for your advice, I have learned alot and my passion for lighting grows when I read the advice here on lawnsite!

NightLightingFX
02-11-2009, 07:00 PM
Sounds like all you need is a fluke meter and wire tools etc.

klkanders
02-11-2009, 07:29 PM
Yep its alot of tools and some equipment. Being in the scapin business already gives you access to alot of tools you already have. Pick up what you need to begin and add as required.
Where are you located in midwest if I may ask?

Keith