PDA

View Full Version : A good case for Drip line.


hoskm01
02-19-2009, 01:17 AM
Words not needed.

http://www.lawnlogistics.com/Storage/IMG_2578.jpg

irrigationgrl
02-19-2009, 06:49 AM
You hope I understand you to mean "it's a good case for a drip line" that looks unsightly because it was installed in a mickey-mouse manner?
Mickey-mouse manner meaning: The person who installed it
(most likely this homeowner or the homeowner before this homeowner)
Used:
1/4 or could even be smaller micro-line as risers instead of the firm hard blk drip risers.

Used: Those cheap spray stakes that are too short get securely in the ground. That are way to short to get good coverage with the spray.
And are like.. so out of date compared to the drip stakes they have available now.
(when in desperation I have been force to use one or two of those kind of stakes I use black zip-ties to secure the bottom of the hard riser to the stake)
Used: Those *&&*%%$ adjustable sprayers on top...that don't spray well and so many more sprays need to be installed than necessary to get it all watered?

Point: all of those factors combine to make it look so much worse than it should if installed well. For example, that front left side bed I would have only used 3 drip sprays maximum and it would have watered well.

FIMCO-MEISTER
02-19-2009, 07:51 AM
I suspect the place looks much better when the perennials are bigger and in bloom. I'm not going to cast judgment on that one until I see it in the summer. I prefer micro-spray to dripline.

Dripit good
02-19-2009, 08:02 AM
I agree. Once the perennials grow they will bury those micro-sprays.

Won't see those lines again until next winter.

DanaMac
02-19-2009, 08:29 AM
Micros sprays have no place next to a high traffic area like the sidewalks. I get tired of repairing that crap because Junior ran it over with his skate board or bicycle.

Tom Tom
02-19-2009, 08:31 AM
I'll bet Pete's new remote, that half of those damn things don't work.

Kiril
02-19-2009, 09:04 AM
Micros sprays have no place next to a high traffic area like the sidewalks. I get tired of repairing that crap because Junior ran it over with his skate board or bicycle.

I have to agree. Micro-sprays definitely have their uses, the front yard of that place is not one of them IMO.

hoskm01
02-19-2009, 10:15 AM
Well, micros do have their place. Agreed.


Snow shovels, bicycles, skateboards. Im surprised any of those are still standing.

Were that the front of a person who gave a toot about the looks of their place, on a BUSY street, you wouldn't see squat.

Mike Leary
02-19-2009, 10:42 AM
Words not needed.

:hammerhead::hammerhead:

Wet_Boots
02-19-2009, 11:00 AM
Where are the hi-pops? (with brass nozzles :))

Kiril
02-19-2009, 11:07 AM
:hammerhead::hammerhead:

Translation .... where are the 5 foot copper risers with brass nozzles spaced every 5 feet. :rolleyes:

Mike Leary
02-19-2009, 11:12 AM
Where are the hi-pops? (with brass nozzles :))

Or even.......

Dripit good
02-19-2009, 11:51 AM
VAN nozzles suck.

Wet_Boots
02-19-2009, 12:07 PM
You don't recognize a 300 series hipop? ::respect diminishes::

ARGOS
02-19-2009, 12:08 PM
12 inch heads would have made that house a lot nicer. Would have cost significantly more for the HO.

VANs are an evil necessity.

Dripit good
02-19-2009, 12:12 PM
That's not a VAN?

Dripit good
02-19-2009, 12:16 PM
VANs are an evil necessity.

I agree they have a place. I've seen them used way too often when not really needed. Compromises happen in just about every zone....nothings perfect.

Wet_Boots
02-19-2009, 12:20 PM
That's not a VAN?The pups have eyes, but will not see :hammerhead:

Dripit good
02-19-2009, 12:23 PM
Maybe I got an eye infection looking at SHE.

FIMCO-MEISTER
02-19-2009, 01:41 PM
Since I plan to encourage ripping out lawns and putting in water hardy perennial beds like that I'm thinking a winter time solution to micros would be while blowing out take the micros out of the ground. Lay sideways near the dripline and cable tie them. Next spring reset and check during spring turn on.

Kiril
02-19-2009, 02:14 PM
Since I plan to encourage ripping out lawns and putting in water hardy perennial beds like that I'm thinking a winter time solution to micros would be while blowing out take the micros out of the ground. Lay sideways near the dripline and cable tie them. Next spring reset and check during spring turn on.

............... Or use Netafim and be done with it. :)

Mike Leary
02-19-2009, 02:21 PM
VAN nozzles suck.

How about glasses? :hammerhead:

Dripit good
02-19-2009, 03:05 PM
I do normally look before I speak. At first glance it looked like a VAN.

Haven't dealt with Toro since the 70's in Tampa. RB & Hunter are what we use now.

I still think VAN's suck, but are ok in the narrow pie shape areas where a fixed noz won't work.

Mike Leary
02-19-2009, 03:12 PM
I do normally look before I speak. At first glance it looked like a VAN.

Haven't dealt with Toro since the 70's in Tampa. RB & Hunter are what we use now.

I still think VAN's suck, but are ok in the narrow pie shape areas where a fixed noz won't work.

Not going to work yourself out of the ditch.

FIMCO-MEISTER
02-19-2009, 03:29 PM
............... Or use Netafim and be done with it. :)

Not as efficient. Customer satisfaction much higher with micro. Easier to allocate water by plants needs with micro.

Mike Leary
02-19-2009, 03:37 PM
Not as efficient. Customer satisfaction much higher with micro. Easier to allocate water by plants needs with micro.

All that stuff is a crock, IMHO.

Dripit good
02-19-2009, 04:28 PM
I'll see you in the ditch Peter. :dizzy:

Mike Leary
02-19-2009, 04:41 PM
I'll see you in the ditch Peter. :dizzy:

Or this....

Wet_Boots
02-19-2009, 06:03 PM
Can't you reduce the head spacing a bit? :)

irritation
02-19-2009, 06:08 PM
Can't you reduce the head spacing a bit? :)

I think he needs to make it a rotor zone. There's some weeds in the woods not getting watered.:laugh:

Waterit
02-19-2009, 06:12 PM
nothings perfect.

You're wrong - Leary is. Just ask him:)

irrigationgrl
02-19-2009, 06:51 PM
You hope I understand you to mean "it's a good case for a drip line" that looks unsightly because it was installed in a mickey-mouse manner?
Mickey-mouse manner meaning: The person who installed it
(most likely this homeowner or the homeowner before this homeowner)
Used:
1/4 or could even be smaller micro-line as risers instead of the firm hard blk drip risers.

Used: Those cheap spray stakes that are too short get securely in the ground. That are way to short to get good coverage with the spray.
And are like.. so out of date compared to the drip stakes they have available now.
(when in desperation I have been force to use one or two of those kind of stakes I use black zip-ties to secure the bottom of the hard riser to the stake)
Used: Those *&&*%%$ adjustable sprayers on top...that don't spray well and so many more sprays need to be installed than necessary to get it all watered?

Point: all of those factors combine to make it look so much worse than it should if installed well. For example, that front left side bed I would have only used 3 drip sprays maximum and it would have watered well.

I was simply explaining to the OP why it looks so bad.
I said (AS AN EXAMPLE) I would have only needed 3 sprays. I did not give my opinion on whether I thought that area should have been irrigated with drip sprays or not. It was done that way...so that's what I was replying too. I agree, in a front yard near a sidewalk is not a place for them.

I disagree that it's ok for a front garden in winter to look like crap. It should look acceptable and pleasing all year long. This is an obvious homeowner installation, not done by a professional. I would not have planted all perennials in the first place. I would have planted evergreen shrubs of several different habits along with drifts of mixed perennial plants as well as tall ornamental grasses that look good in winter. I would not have used drip spray to irrigate them, but a dripline with emitters instead and installed it so it would not be obvious seen in summer or winte.

Wet_Boots
02-19-2009, 07:33 PM
......I would not have used drip spray to irrigate them, but a dripline with emitters instead and installed it so it would not be obvious seen in summer or winte.And what brand(s) of emitters do you favor? :)

Mike Leary
02-19-2009, 07:39 PM
I think he needs to make it a rotor zone. There's some weeds in the woods not getting watered.:laugh:

Might notice no water coming out of front loaders; they are blank nozzles for the future. :dizzy:

hoskm01
02-19-2009, 09:20 PM
............... Or use Netafim and be done with it. :)


That would have been my course.

I was simply explaining to the OP why it looks so bad.


I knew it looked terrible, hence- picture takey, and picture postey!

Might notice no water coming out of front loaders; they are blank nozzles for the future. :dizzy:


Still shootin blanks?

Mike Leary
02-19-2009, 09:24 PM
Still shootin blanks?

Anyone else doing that?

hoskm01
02-19-2009, 09:33 PM
Anyone else doing that?
I was crackin one at ya.

I have done it. Even a whole zone of rotors, 5k+, just turned them off until that part went in, some time later.

mowerman111
02-19-2009, 10:15 PM
I guess I won't post any pics of my wife's iris bed.

hoskm01
02-19-2009, 10:24 PM
I guess I won't post any pics of my wife's iris bed.
Does she have pretty eyes?

ARGOS
02-19-2009, 10:44 PM
Still shootin blanks?

Just for the record...I'm not shooting blanks.

mowerman111
02-20-2009, 01:04 AM
Does she have pretty eyes?

You verrry funny HAHA

Kiril
02-20-2009, 10:10 AM
Not as efficient.

Whoa there homeboy. Please explain that reasoning.

Customer satisfaction much higher with micro.

Perhaps, for those that "need" to see the system running. For those people I point to the indicator flag.

Easier to allocate water by plants needs with micro.

Once again, huh? If you are using micro-sprinklers it is no different than solid set sprinklers. Now if your going to water on a per plant basis with something like shrubblers or drippers and spaghetti tubing then I might agree with you on that. Fact of the matter is, if you find the need to water on a per plant basis within a hydrozone then the landscape was poorly designed.

The way I approach a redesign of mixed water requirements is to design and schedule for the needs of the majority in the hydrozone. What doesn't make it gets replaced with an appropriate plant.

FIMCO-MEISTER
02-20-2009, 10:18 AM
We'll see after I do further studies with my aquaterr. I realize the spacing of the dripline is key BUT I'm going to set up dripline according to netafim specs and measure the area in between runs. I want to see how many gallons it takes to get the between areas at the same moisture level as the dripper areas. I'm going to compare that to the estimated gallons needed to apply water 2" in the root zone. If you are trying to get the entire bed at the same soil moisture level I think Mike's and my spike spray method will be more effective. If you are trying to water individual plants than drip is more effective.

Whoa there homeboy. Please explain that reasoning.



Perhaps, for those that "need" to see the system running. For those people I point to the indicator flag.



Once again, huh? If you are using micro-sprinklers it is no different than solid set sprinklers. Now if your going to water on a per plant basis with something like shrubblers or drippers and spaghetti tubing then I might agree with you on that. Fact of the matter is, if you find the need to water on a per plant basis within a hydrozone then the landscape was poorly designed.

The way I approach a redesign of mixed water requirements is to design and schedule for the needs of the majority in the hydrozone. What doesn't make it gets replaced with an appropriate plant.

Kiril
02-20-2009, 10:37 AM
I realize the spacing of the dripline is key BUT I'm going to set up dripline according to netafim specs and measure the area in between runs.

Now why would you do that? Set up the line using their "specs" as a general guideline (i.e. dripper output, spacing of drippers and lines), but final layout is always determined based on site and plant needs.

For example, say in one hydrozone I have a group of plants that like it a little bit wetter than others in the zone, or I have variable exposure which affects the micro-climate, but not to the extent that a new hydrozone is warranted. By adjusting line spacing & dripper spacing (i.e. opposing drippers vs. staggered) to accommodate these variables I can overcome potential problems that the "specs" will never cover.

If you are trying to get the entire bed at the same soil moisture level I think Mike's and my spike spray method will be more effective. If you are trying to water individual plants than drip is more effective.

Why would you want or need to do this? That kind of coverage in a planting bed is a huge waste of water. There is absolutely NO need to wet every square inch of soil and leaves, especially in your soils.

With a netafim grid, you want the soil moisture to decrease as a function of distance from the emitter (saturation to optimal).

Same thing applies to a micro-sprinkler that utilizes a stream nozzle, or once again a shrubbler/single dripper. Assuming no wind drift, soil moisture decreases as you move away from the application point of the stream.

FIMCO-MEISTER
02-20-2009, 10:47 AM
Now why would you do that? Set up the line using their "specs" as a general guideline (i.e. dripper output, spacing of drippers and lines), but final layout is always determined based on site and plant needs.

For example, say in one hydrozone I have a group of plants that like it a little bit wetter than others in the zone, or I have variable exposure which affects the micro-climate, but not to the extent that a new hydrozone is warranted. By adjusting line spacing & dripper spacing (i.e. opposing drippers vs. staggered) to accommodate these variables I can overcome potential problems that the "specs" will never cover.



Why would you want or need to do this? That kind of coverage in a planting bed is a huge waste of water. There is absolutely NO need to wet every square inch of soil and leaves, especially in your soils.

With a netafim grid, you want the soil moisture to decrease as a function of distance from the emitter (saturation to optimal).

Same thing applies to a micro-sprinkler that utilizes a stream nozzle, or once again a shrubbler/single dripper. Assuming no wind drift, soil moisture decreases as you move away from the application point of the stream.

Then I will measure optimal and not equal saturation. The other issue with grid netafim is that chance for a mishap increases greatly. Low spraying Micros cover more area and less chance for mishap in gardening.

hoskm01
02-20-2009, 10:51 AM
Then I will measure optimal and not equal saturation. The other issue with grid netafim is that chance for a mishap increases greatly. Low spraying Micros cover more area and less chance for mishap in gardening.
In a heavily worked bed, I could agree.

In a bed planted and left until one dies, not an issue with Netafim down.

Kiril
02-20-2009, 10:58 AM
In a heavily worked bed, I could agree.

I do as well. I stress to all clients that have a netafim grid, when you have a shovel in your hand ALWAYS find the lines before digging.
It really is not that big of a deal IMHO.