PDA

View Full Version : Test Your Knowledge ... dedicated to rlpsystems


Kiril
02-23-2009, 01:06 AM
The following is replicated from the other thread. Put you money where your mouth is .... test your knowledge.

So what should we review first? Any monkey can figure out flow and pressure, lets talk about the really good stuff.

You choose a place to start.


Proper hydrozone design/layout
Calculation of hydrozone water requirements
Optimizing nutrient management via irrigation design and scheduling
Optimizing pesticide application via irrigation design and management
Optimizing water use and BMP for conserving water
How to manage an irrigated aridosol
How to design and manage a system to comply with LEED (this one is for JW)


Note: The above list is not all inclusive and I reserve the right to add to it.

Pick a list item and address it to the best of your ability. This is open to anyone, but primarily RLP since she asked for it. ;)

rlpsystems
02-23-2009, 01:23 AM
hydrozone...Native to local soils. Around here its clay so that equals poor drainage so if the soils not amended plant plants that thrive with wet feet. Watering these will depend on how fast area dries. Twice a week with pop ups. 15 minutes.

rlpsystems
02-23-2009, 01:27 AM
Aridosol...........Wrong area

rlpsystems
02-23-2009, 01:29 AM
LEED. Leadership in Energy Enviromental Design. Area in no where near that..

DanaMac
02-23-2009, 01:31 AM
How about discussing it, and not giving a definition. I'm not jumping into this pitfall though.

rlpsystems
02-23-2009, 01:32 AM
Best Management Practices...... Get it while its wet.....

Kiril
02-23-2009, 01:34 AM
hydrozone...Native to local soils. Around here its clay so that equals poor drainage so if the soils not amended plant plants that thrive with wet feet. Watering these will depend on how fast area dries. Twice a week with pop ups. 15 minutes.

Oh my, now who is kidding. You need to do ALOT better than that.

For example:

How do you utilize the landscape coefficient method in your designs and scheduling?

How do you determine hydrozone ET without a "smart" controller?

How many potential hydrozones can a property have?

How do you determine leaching requirements based on:

a) Soil type and condition
b) Environment/climate and micro-climates
c) Soil SAR and EC
d) Water quality

rlpsystems
02-23-2009, 01:36 AM
How about discussing it, and not giving a definition. I'm not jumping into this pitfall though.

Seems like some great topics, but not really happening in my area. Hate to be the one who does not know Irrigation Nationwide. But Oh Well... I can live with that...............

rlpsystems
02-23-2009, 01:40 AM
Oh my, now who is kidding. You need to do ALOT better than that.

For example:

How do you utilize the landscape coefficient method in your designs and scheduling?

How do you determine hydrozone ET without a "smart" controller?

How many potential hydrozones can a property have?

How do you determine leaching requirements based on:

a) Soil type and condition
b) Environment/climate and micro-climates
c) Soil SAR and EC
d) Water quality
BLAH,BLAH,BLAH,BLAH,BLAH,BLAH. Sounds great that your the wizard but around here an irrigation system needs to water turf and possibly plants. I understand your point, but it gets no where. So preach on Giril...........

Kiril
02-23-2009, 01:52 AM
Seems like some great topics, but not really happening in my area. Hate to be the one who does not know Irrigation Nationwide. But Oh Well... I can live with that...............

Sorry girl, not good enough. These are questions every irrigator worth his/her salt should be able to address. These are not area specific, with the exception of the aridisol (sry for the previous misspeel) and even that is not very area specific given about 1/3 of the earths land mass has them. So I'll change that question to this.

1) How do you manage an irrigation system when ET exceeds precipitation?

So I guess the question is .... are you an irrigator or a pipe gluer?

mitchgo
02-23-2009, 01:53 AM
I usually don't do sayings.. But I have always felt if you can talk the talk, you have to walk the walk... and if you can't ...just back out and man up son!

Kiril
02-23-2009, 01:55 AM
BLAH,BLAH,BLAH,BLAH,BLAH,BLAH. Sounds great that your the wizard but around here an irrigation system needs to water turf and possibly plants. I understand your point, but it gets no where. So preach on Giril...........

Oh, I see .... not quite as knowledgeable as you believe. Point made.

Anyone else want to address the questions in the interest of exploring "new" areas of the trade you may not have been aware of?

bicmudpuppy
02-23-2009, 02:24 AM
If I "step" in here, we will end up with another "sustainability" issue discussion, and I'm not up for it, but your question about precip vs ET hits VERY close to how I live. I'm in an area with a monthly ET over 7". I've spent most of my irrigation career in areas where 1" of rain / wk was actually over watering in most cases. You add in the micro climate of the average golf green and can you even imagine trying to irrigate effectively? I will spend 3-4 man WEEKS this summer with a 30gpm HOSE in my hand. This is on irrigated turf and to baby 2A total area. Precip rate for most of my irrigated areas works out to .67"/hour. Greens have the same precip rate and except for a few "issues", the DU is very good on the green. The banks and slopes around the green provide many challenges I will be addressing this spring. On a "heavy" water day, I run about 4K irrigation events. It takes 90 events for each "cycle" to water all my greens. To get a decent cycle and soak and apply about 1/4", (call it 20 minutes) I run 360 events. (4 - 5minute cycles)

The state guideline for irrigation is 3 A'/A of irrigated land. I pay to irrigate 85A. We own or lease water rights to 250A'. My personal goal for this year is to get the water use down below 200A'.

Kiril
02-23-2009, 02:28 AM
We own or lease water rights to 250A'. My personal goal for this year is to get the water use down below 200A'.

With the management changes we have been discussing over in that "other" forum, eventually you will probably do even better than that. :clapping:

bicmudpuppy
02-23-2009, 02:29 AM
Auditing w/ cans. Do you advocate a complete grid of cans? My auditing is normally on greens. I like to set up cans (actually bar glasses) in an "X" pattern. I "draw" a line between the heads on the green, making an "X". I then space a few extra glasses within the "X" to double check. The "X" gives me a good baseline with the only real variation possible due to a head not being level, or obstructed. The extra cans are to makes sure we aren't being obstructed or having a travel issue with the rotor.

Kiril
02-23-2009, 02:41 AM
I advocate a complete grid + additional cans if possible immediately outside the intended coverage area. This facilitates easier determination of DU & AE and allows for enough data to construct a relatively accurate graphical representation (be it GIS or 3D/4D topo).

Oh, and you obviously need to know the position of the cans relative to the landscape (i.e. a measured grid).
Thought I would mention that in case it wasn't obvious.

FIMCO-MEISTER
02-23-2009, 08:13 AM
On the can layout topic..... The readings were so erratic in our auditing class that I decided a visual observation of the system before can layout would be better. Then layout the cans where coverage seems the best. Do test and record the results. Explain that this would be the schedule IF the zone was in optimum operation. Based on observation though we will need to prepare to adjust OR lets get this thing fixed so we have optimum operation everywhere. (My brain is turning auditing into money making. Scientific results are great but they don't feed the family.)

FIMCO-MEISTER
02-23-2009, 08:15 AM
Seems like some great topics, but not really happening in my area. Hate to be the one who does not know Irrigation Nationwide. But Oh Well... I can live with that...............

Hey Rlp people create happenings. If you wait for a HAPPENING you'll be behind the curve.

hoskm01
02-23-2009, 10:23 AM
hydrozone...Native to local soils. Around here its clay so that equals poor drainage so if the soils not amended plant plants that thrive with wet feet. Watering these will depend on how fast area dries. Twice a week with pop ups. 15 minutes.
Everything gets the same amount of water? You have not even defined a hydrozone, much less discussed its handling during install or management.

Your "not my area" or "typical" approach to water management is scary. You are a good example of why smart controllers and designs by CID's, CIC's, CIA's should be mandatory, but thats probably "not happening there."

Be a leader, not a follower. Most on here are leaders; schitt or get off the pot!

Tom Tom
02-23-2009, 10:24 AM
On the can layout topic..... The readings were so erratic in our auditing class that I decided a visual observation of the system before can layout would be better. Then layout the cans where coverage seems the best. Do test and record the results. Explain that this would be the schedule IF the zone was in optimum operation. Based on observation though we will need to prepare to adjust OR lets get this thing fixed so we have optimum operation everywhere. (My brain is turning auditing into money making. Scientific results are great but they don't feed the family.)

Peter-

Had a class a couple years ago that claimed a 15 to 20% increase from catch can (DU) uniformity to soil moisture uniformity. Might be something for you to check into with your Aquaterr

Kiril
02-23-2009, 11:00 AM
On the can layout topic..... The readings were so erratic in our auditing class that I decided a visual observation of the system before can layout would be better.

Absolutely. With sprays/rotors/impacts the audit should start with a full assessment of the sprinklers, the nozzles being used, and the flow/pressure at those nozzles. From this data you can determine if it is even worth pulling out your catch cans. The flow/pressure stuff is pretty anal, but should at least be done for each different nozzle type and random sprinklers as a function of distance from the source to get an idea of how well the system was designed and to allow calculation of a precipitation rate independent of your catch cans.

Another thing to consider ... audits are best run at the time the sprinkler system would normally be running.

BTW, did anyone determine why the readings were so erratic?

Then layout the cans where coverage seems the best. Do test and record the results.

Not sure about this Pete. If you are not going to be repairing the system, speaking strictly for scheduling purposes I would think determining the low quarter would be paramount as this will be the minimum run time required.

Kiril
02-23-2009, 11:03 AM
Had a class a couple years ago that claimed a 15 to 20% increase from catch can (DU) uniformity to soil moisture uniformity. Might be something for you to check into with your Aquaterr

This is where we cross the line between DU and AE.

FIMCO-MEISTER
02-23-2009, 11:54 AM
Not sure about this Pete. If you are not going to be repairing the system, speaking strictly for scheduling purposes I would think determining the low quarter would be paramount as this will be the minimum run time required.

I approach things from a "Glass is half full" perspective. But I see your point and had considered that as well.

EagleLandscape
02-23-2009, 03:06 PM
1. Proper hydrozone design/layout
2. Calculation of hydrozone water requirements
3. Optimizing nutrient management via irrigation design and scheduling
4. Optimizing pesticide application via irrigation design and management
5. Optimizing water use and BMP for conserving water
6. How to manage an irrigated aridosol
7. How to design and manage a system to comply with LEED (this one is for JW)

Some of these I know, and some I don't know the best answer for. I will not lie and say I know, what I have no clue about.

1. Things to look at. Plant type, slope, sun/shade, soil types, honestly anything that influences plants requirement for water, or environmental aspects of the site that will dictate how water will be used. You could even go as far as soil samples of the areas, organic matter content, etc. The sky is the limit on hydrozones. (I would know, I have 17 in my front yard):) You could even go as far into cultural practices (ie: seperate hydrozone for areas that need to look 110%, versus utility areas which don't need to look 110%.) (given they would be on the same zone anyways. I think this question is fairly simple, so I will not go into the details about what the criteria are.

2. Calculation of hydrozone requirements. You will need to know the information on all components within that hydrozone. PR, ET coefficient of plant material, etc. If you are wanting to end up with the run time per zone, calculate the ET of a zone, (given this will change, skys is the limit on recalculation intervals as well) and subtract the rain fall from the total ET amount of the plant. that will give you deficit. (if there is any)

typically if southern grass needs 1" of water a week, the general idea has been to water 3x a week @ 15 mins. If this were the case, the PR of the heads (adjusting for distribution unifromity, misting if any, etc.) would be .02 inches of water per minute, or 1.3" of water per hour.

3. Nutrient management. I will take a stab at this, and hope I say atleast one thing right. Factors such as CEC will play a big part in this. Current organic matter levels and existing site conditions will play a key role in this as well. I don't believe in fertigation. if sodium is a problem with the irrigation water, it could lead to high pH levels. this is too broad of a question to ask, there is not one specific correct answer for this question. The awareness of the possible influence to the nutrient levels to the soil caused by irrigation water will need to be known. once that is know, appropriate action can be taken.

4. I don't know the answer. I will guess about certain REI will play a factor into the influence of irrigation + application times. Certain herbicides work better if leaf surface is wet, (natural surfactant), so in some cases running and wetting the leaf surface is best prior to application. Some pesticides, and herbicides work better dry. READ THE LABEL:)

5. RESPONSIBILITY, EDUCATION, CONTINUAL LEARNING, LEARNING, LEARNING! BMP change and evolve, we all know that. Being professional and keeping up with these are highly important. BMP 30 years ago, are not the same as what they were last year. Heck last years BMP has changed this year even!

6. Only soil types like that in Texas are on the west coast, which I don't come into contact with. Don't know the answer.

7. My father has been doing alot of LEEd stuff. he says the calculations take a long time for the size jobs he's on. Adds about $1,000 to each design is what he's been charging I think as an upcharge. LEED manual is what I would refer to. I am reading your links right now Kiril, will be calling that lady in an hour after I skim through.

EagleLandscape
02-23-2009, 03:14 PM
Absolutely. With sprays/rotors/impacts the audit should start with a full assessment of the sprinklers, the nozzles being used, and the flow/pressure at those nozzles. From this data you can determine if it is even worth pulling out your catch cans. The flow/pressure stuff is pretty anal, but should at least be done for each different nozzle type and random sprinklers as a function of distance from the source to get an idea of how well the system was designed and to allow calculation of a precipitation rate independent of your catch cans.

Another thing to consider ... audits are best run at the time the sprinkler system would normally be running.

BTW, did anyone determine why the readings were so erratic?



Not sure about this Pete. If you are not going to be repairing the system, speaking strictly for scheduling purposes I would think determining the low quarter would be paramount as this will be the minimum run time required.

on your comment about performing audits at typical start time of clock, is this due to evaporation, possible wind, etc? environmental patterns that would regularly happen that that time of the day? or am i missing something?

what do you think the percentage different would be if you didnt run it at the typical start time? 5% off, 20% off, .01% off. just curious?

Kiril
02-23-2009, 04:00 PM
on your comment about performing audits at typical start time of clock, is this due to evaporation, possible wind, etc? environmental patterns that would regularly happen that that time of the day? or am i missing something?

what do you think the percentage different would be if you didnt run it at the typical start time? 5% off, 20% off, .01% off. just curious?

I'll answer this now, and comment on the other post when I have more time.

Pressure fluctuations in the system is where I was going with that comment, but wind is also a factor. We all know supply pressure fluctuates over the course of a day in a given neighborhood. Now this is not saying all systems are like this, but if there is the potential for it, you would be better off doing the audit at the normal system run time. Of course if you are watering at 3am, this could be a problem. Bottom line, you should do the audit at a time that most accurately represents the actual conditions of the system and environment during a normal run cycle.

ET should not be a major issue for an audit assuming you aren't leaving your "cans" in the sun for an extended period of time before recording the data.

Mike Leary
02-23-2009, 04:03 PM
Of course if you are watering at 3am, this could be a problem.

More words of wisdom.

Kiril
02-23-2009, 04:06 PM
More words of wisdom.

Sometimes you just have to speel it out. ;)

EagleLandscape
02-23-2009, 04:36 PM
our commercial properties start that early. some at 10pm. the watering window on 20 - 32 zones is long:)

hoskm01
02-23-2009, 04:42 PM
our commercial properties start that early. some at 10pm. the watering window on 20 - 32 zones is long:)
They take a while sometimes. Peak summer, we start some at 6-7pm, later the better. 14-16 hours on some, and thats just half. Water 6 days/week, alternating halves.

HokieAg07
02-23-2009, 05:28 PM
Ive got some places that start at 7 PM and run until 7AM, hell Ive had places that have damn near or have run 24 hours a day.....

Unfortunetely I have to work with what water I have available

Mike Leary
02-23-2009, 06:04 PM
Ive had places that have damn near or have run 24 hours a day.....

We have one with double Rain Master 48s that run 24/7 using 24 programs and 20 ISCs. We use percentage to adjust, though the system is wired for central.

hoskm01
02-23-2009, 06:26 PM
though the system is wired for central.

Well turn it the heck on.

For every off-topic post you make here, you could adjust 48 stations from the same keyboard.

Mike Leary
02-23-2009, 07:21 PM
Well turn it the heck on.

For every off-topic post you make here, you could adjust 48 stations from the same keyboard.

Um, it's the matter of a dedicated fax/land line at each site, $6000 dollars worth of software, a brand new PC to take the loading. Other than that, we are pikers.

hoskm01
02-23-2009, 08:00 PM
Um, it's the matter of a dedicated fax/land line at each site,


Go wireless.


$6000 dollars worth of software,


Yeah, thats a little steep. Hadnt priced the software.

a brand new PC to take the loading. Other than that, we are pikers.


Cant load onto existing PC? I understood it was software only, you run it. And yes, you are pikers!:laugh:

bicmudpuppy
02-23-2009, 09:42 PM
our commercial properties start that early. some at 10pm. the watering window on 20 - 32 zones is long:)

John, the impact that the supply pressure has is a biggie here. You have to have an idea of what pressure changes occur and how they affect the zones that are running at that time. 22:00 is probably safe unless there is a heavy water user in that area at THAT time. On the other end of the curve, run times after around 4:00 in residential areas fluctuate depending on the demographic of the homeowners. If they are all seasonal landscape/irrigation types, they start using water at 3:30, but are done by 5:00. Other occupations have more liveable schedules :)

In my situation, if I am auditing a green, I setup watering some fairways or rough areas at the same time. The goal is to "max out" the system to what the computer runs during the night while the greens are running. I turn on one green of four or five heads/zones, my rate and uniformity might be VERY different from when I am running almost 2Kgpm. (four heads would be about 150gpm, but only 140gpm when the system is "max'd".

Mike Leary
02-23-2009, 09:51 PM
Go wireless.

Poor cell connection + pricey monthly charges.


Yeah, thats a little steep. Hadnt priced the software.

Yup + a couple of weather stations for the micro climates.


Cant load onto existing PC? I understood it was software only, you run it. And yes, you are pikers!:laugh:

Microsoft only, and a very big computor. We still hope to pull it off, but remain
pikers with Rain Master hats.

Mike Leary
02-23-2009, 09:53 PM
Go wireless.

Poor cell connection + pricey monthly charges.


Yeah, thats a little steep. Hadnt priced the software.

Yup + a couple of weather stations for the micro climates.


Cant load onto existing PC? I understood it was software only, you run it. And yes, you are pikers!:laugh:

Microsoft only, and a very big computer. We still hope to pull it off, but remain
pikers with Rain Master hats.

hoskm01
02-23-2009, 09:55 PM
Hats are priceless.

Waterit
02-23-2009, 10:11 PM
Hats are priceless.

So are double posts, right Mike?

There is software out there that can be had for WAY less than 6K - I looked at a system a while back that was running WetWare, which lists for like 5K but can be had from WM for about $500 if you use their controls.

irrig8r
02-24-2009, 02:59 AM
1) How do you manage an irrigation system when ET exceeds precipitation?



If the ET didn't exceed the (natural) precipitation, then an irrigation system would not even be necessary, now would it?

If we're talking about precip. rate of applied irrigation, then either you increase the run times (duration) or the start times (frequency) depending on the infiltration rate of the soil (slope, soil type).

Kiril
02-24-2009, 08:33 AM
If the ET didn't exceed the (natural) precipitation, then an irrigation system would not even be necessary, now would it?

You are kidding ...... right?

Kiril
02-24-2009, 09:29 AM
1. Things to look at. Plant type, slope, sun/shade, soil types, honestly anything that influences plants requirement for water, or environmental aspects of the site that will dictate how water will be used. You could even go as far as soil samples of the areas, organic matter content, etc. The sky is the limit on hydrozones. (I would know, I have 17 in my front yard):) You could even go as far into cultural practices (ie: seperate hydrozone for areas that need to look 110%, versus utility areas which don't need to look 110%.) (given they would be on the same zone anyways. I think this question is fairly simple, so I will not go into the details about what the criteria are.

Personally I wouldn't put knowing your soil as an optional item. You already know what I think about your 17 hydrozones in your front yard. Smart landscape design should go hand in hand with smart irrigation design, and we all know how well LA's design irrigation. All in all, you know what a hydrozone is .... you pass. :)

2. Calculation of hydrozone requirements. You will need to know the information on all components within that hydrozone. PR, ET coefficient of plant material, etc. If you are wanting to end up with the run time per zone, calculate the ET of a zone, (given this will change, skys is the limit on recalculation intervals as well) and subtract the rain fall from the total ET amount of the plant. that will give you deficit. (if there is any)

OK, good from the ET calculation point of view, although I was hoping for someone to actually demonstrate how it is done (using software is acceptable I guess). There is also monitoring soil moisture and other factors that may require adjustments to the schedule.

typically if southern grass needs 1" of water a week, the general idea has been to water 3x a week @ 15 mins. If this were the case, the PR of the heads (adjusting for distribution unifromity, misting if any, etc.) would be .02 inches of water per minute, or 1.3" of water per hour.

Focus less on amount per week and more on amount per inch of soil depth.

3. Nutrient management. I will take a stab at this, and hope I say atleast one thing right. Factors such as CEC will play a big part in this. Current organic matter levels and existing site conditions will play a key role in this as well. I don't believe in fertigation. if sodium is a problem with the irrigation water, it could lead to high pH levels. this is too broad of a question to ask, there is not one specific correct answer for this question. The awareness of the possible influence to the nutrient levels to the soil caused by irrigation water will need to be known. once that is know, appropriate action can be taken.

Where I was going with this was how best to manage your irrigation to maximize nutrient uptake by your plants and overall soil health. This could be both post fertilizer application or in general. Technical discussion on soil solutions & biology, potential gradients, and soil factors in general that are affected by irrigation is welcome. :)

4. I don't know the answer. I will guess about certain REI will play a factor into the influence of irrigation + application times. Certain herbicides work better if leaf surface is wet, (natural surfactant), so in some cases running and wetting the leaf surface is best prior to application. Some pesticides, and herbicides work better dry. READ THE LABEL:)

This one, similar to nutrient management, optimizing your pesticide application via irrigation management (think efficacy, uptake, and pollution).

5. RESPONSIBILITY, EDUCATION, CONTINUAL LEARNING, LEARNING, LEARNING! BMP change and evolve, we all know that. Being professional and keeping up with these are highly important. BMP 30 years ago, are not the same as what they were last year. Heck last years BMP has changed this year even!

Yes on the above, but I was looking more for specific methods of conserving water.

6. Only soil types like that in Texas are on the west coast, which I don't come into contact with. Don't know the answer.

Modified that question to ET exceeds precipitation.

EagleLandscape
02-24-2009, 07:23 PM
5. If you have an hour to read, and 3 hours for me to write I could list the endless possibilities of how to conserve water.

Here is my take. You have two types of irrigators (minimum). Those who fix broken sprinkler heads, and those that are masters at the trade and the industry. Only the latter is a true irrigator, the rest are just "electricians and pipe repair men".

If someone does have the vaguest clue on how to answer those questions (which I know I don't know all of the answers, but know some, (better than nothing I guess)), then they are not a truly qualified irrigator. I have only met one in person in my life, and that is Peter.

Mike Leary
02-24-2009, 07:35 PM
a truly qualified irrigator. I have only met one in person in my life, and that is Peter.

I've been lucky enough to learn from a couple old timers that had "The Knack".
Without them, I'd be shopping at Home Depot.

irrig8r
02-25-2009, 11:44 AM
You are kidding ...... right?

No, I wasn't kidding at all.

If the ET rate is below the natural precipitation (both expressed in inches per week say) then why would one be irrigating?

Is there such a thing as a negative ET?

Kiril
02-25-2009, 12:10 PM
If the ET rate is below the natural precipitation (both expressed in inches per week say) then why would one be irrigating?

Because precipitation != available water for several reasons.

1) runoff
2) wetting beyond the effective root zone

Consider this.

Say we have a site with a ETo of 5 in/month. Now we have have a single rain event (or even two events in close proximity) for a total of 6 inches for that month. Will this water be available for plant use for the entire month? Perhaps ... or more likely not.

If we have an effective root zone of 2", and that soil drys to the PWP in 7 days or less, ET has now "exceeded" precipitation.

In order for your scenario to work, precipitation would have to pretty much mirror ET at an interval that provides for replenishment of soil water reserves prior to PWP levels being reached.

This is why we need to determine the effective input of precipitation into the system as opposed to just using a total. This is also a prime example of why SMS based systems are superior to ET based systems.

irrig8r
02-25-2009, 12:33 PM
Because precipitation != available water for several reasons.

1) runoff
2) wetting beyond the effective root zone

Consider this.

Say we have a site with a ETo of 5 in/month. Now we have have a single rain event (or even two events in close proximity) for a total of 6 inches for that month. Will this water be available for plant use for the entire month? Perhaps ... or more likely not.

If we have an effective root zone of 2", and that soil drys to the PWP in 7 days or less, ET has now "exceeded" precipitation.

In order for your scenario to work, precipitation would have to pretty much mirror ET at an interval that provides for replenishment of soil water reserves prior to PWP levels being reached.

This is why we need to determine the effective input of precipitation into the system as opposed to just using a total. This is also a prime example of why SMS based systems are superior to ET based systems.

Of course, here in California the wet season (if we can call it that) is usually concurrent with cooler weather and little irrigation is necessary November thru March.

If we were to drastically reduce turf, and limit ourselves to plants from "Mediterranean" regions (South Africa, Australia, New Zealand, Chile, Southern Europe, as well as California) that are adapted to similar climate, then we would be way ahead of the game... more sustainable landscapes through periods of drought.

As for the rest of the country... I'm not sure because I have only visited and not lived there.

Turf in places like Palm Springs and Phoenix seems pretty stupid to me though (of course, I'm a fisherman, not a golfer... so I'm biased).

Kiril
02-25-2009, 12:38 PM
If we were to drastically reduce turf, and limit ourselves to plants from "Mediterranean" regions (South Africa, Australia, New Zealand, Chile, Southern Europe, as well as California) that are adapted to similar climate, then we would be way ahead of the game... more sustainable landscapes through periods of drought.

:clapping::clapping: Now if we can just convince all the turf lovers.

Mike Leary
02-25-2009, 05:01 PM
:clapping::clapping: Now if we can just convince all the turf lovers.

Generally, turf disappears up north when their water bill goes through the roof, not because of any "green" leanings; we're talkin' old school here.

DanaMac
02-25-2009, 05:10 PM
Generally, turf disappears up north when their water bill goes through the roof, not because of any "green" leanings; we're talkin' old school here.

It's probably going to happen here this year. Rates going up 40%.

irrig8r
02-25-2009, 09:07 PM
Of course, turf has it's place... athletic fields, parks, backyards for those with kids and dogs... but the notion of the curb appeal of a rolling green lawn in California, whether in homes or industrial parks, that never really gets any use, is passe at best.

irrig8r
02-25-2009, 09:10 PM
:clapping::clapping: Now if we can just convince all the turf lovers.

Remember, I'm just talking about my area of California... I have no idea about places where they get summer rain and high humidity for instance.

Mike Leary
03-29-2009, 12:53 AM
The following is replicated from the other thread. Put you money where your mouth is .... test your knowledge.

Thanks for the walk-thru of your site, I learned much.

EagleLandscape
03-29-2009, 08:00 AM
This is why we need to determine the effective input of precipitation into the system as opposed to just using a total. This is also a prime example of why SMS based systems are superior to ET based systems.

I just caught this... Kiril, that is a great point.