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lawn dogg
02-23-2009, 01:08 AM
Ive got a pretty steep slope that's only about 5' deep and 100' long that i need to landscape, cant decide whether to use shredded mulch or oyster shells. (both being available) the problem with using mulch is keeping it from washing down the hill, I am planning to use a fabric. Does anyone have any advice on how to keep the mulch in place. Ive heard of a product called mulchmagnet just wondering if anyone has used it. :confused:

White Gardens
02-23-2009, 11:45 AM
Ive got a pretty steep slope that's only about 5' deep and 100' long that i need to landscape, cant decide whether to use shredded mulch or oyster shells. (both being available) the problem with using mulch is keeping it from washing down the hill, I am planning to use a fabric. Does anyone have any advice on how to keep the mulch in place. Ive heard of a product called mulchmagnet just wondering if anyone has used it. :confused:

I would use a larger landscaping rock such as 2.5inch river rock or something similar.

If the slope is too steep, I would maybe think about incorporating a creeping juniper in the design.

david shumaker
02-23-2009, 08:11 PM
Most yards around here have the small creeping junipers like said above. The junipers should hold the mulch in place'

I've got a hill in my back yard that washes away. I've been planting monkey grass that I pull out of customers yards and planting it on the slope.

Sweet Tater
02-23-2009, 08:37 PM
pachysandra is a very prolific grower and would do great imo on a slope such as you discribed

White Gardens
02-23-2009, 09:32 PM
pachysandra is a very prolific grower and would do great imo on a slope such as you discribed

Good call, but the area needs to be well shaded for it to thrive.

AmGreen
02-24-2009, 03:01 AM
I would not recommend using the matting on the slope. It's been my experience that this tends to allow for the mulch/rocks to slide easily on a "slicker" surface. In turn all of your mulch/rocks will end up at the bottom of the slope. Instead apply mulch/rocks at a depth of 3"-4" initially to get a good weed suppression. You may also want to incorporate creeping raspberry - non invasive and easily edged with a mechanical edger.

addictedtolandscaping
02-24-2009, 07:26 AM
I think you are in a rip wrap situation. If it is as steep as I am picturing, mulch, shells etc will end up down the hill in my experiences. The fabric - Jute mesh as it is known here is more designed for attempting to grow grass etc.

Another option would be to build a retaining wall either srw or 6x6 etc, and terrace it down. This will limit your slope some and you will be able to get your mulching materials to hols their own.

AmGreen
02-24-2009, 10:49 AM
Be careful with adding a "permanent" structure as this may require some type of permit or engineering - depending on codes in your area.

lawn dogg
02-24-2009, 12:41 PM
I would not recommend using the matting on the slope. It's been my experience that this tends to allow for the mulch/rocks to slide easily on a "slicker" surface. In turn all of your mulch/rocks will end up at the bottom of the slope. Instead apply mulch/rocks at a depth of 3"-4" initially to get a good weed suppression. You may also want to incorporate creeping raspberry - non invasive and easily edged with a mechanical edger.

Do you think it would be ok to plant junipers and nandina then put the creeping raspberry through out the shrubs or would the rasperry chock out the plants.
This area has been sodded two years ago but just keep having problems with the grass because it doesnt hold any water so i will need to kill off the grass first. will the raspberry take over the grass quickly, dont want to have to deal with a bunch of grass growing all up through the area. also if i was to use a fabric then the raspberry would not be able to spread am i right about this thought.

White Gardens
02-24-2009, 02:16 PM
Do you think it would be ok to plant junipers and nandina then put the creeping raspberry through out the shrubs or would the rasperry chock out the plants.
This area has been sodded two years ago but just keep having problems with the grass because it doesnt hold any water so i will need to kill off the grass first. will the raspberry take over the grass quickly, dont want to have to deal with a bunch of grass growing all up through the area. also if i was to use a fabric then the raspberry would not be able to spread am i right about this thought.


Spray the area with round-up first.

If you use a weed barrier, then rock, you'll have no problems with weed suppression.

I would probably stick with either the Juniper, or the Raspberry, but not both. They'll end up growing together and it will look messy.

I've seen creeping juniper grow in landscaping rock. It's a semi-slow grower and the roots are aggressive enough to grab hold in between the rocks.

lawn dogg
02-24-2009, 06:00 PM
Spray the area with round-up first.

If you use a weed barrier, then rock, you'll have no problems with weed suppression.

I would probably stick with either the Juniper, or the Raspberry, but not both. They'll end up growing together and it will look messy.

I've seen creeping juniper grow in landscaping rock. It's a semi-slow grower and the roots are aggressive enough to grab hold in between the rocks.

Thanks for your help, I think I'll go with the junipers and incorporate a few points of interest with groupings. thinking about the andora compacta junipers have you had success with them.

AmGreen
02-24-2009, 06:38 PM
Do you think it would be ok to plant junipers and nandina then put the creeping raspberry through out the shrubs or would the rasperry chock out the plants.
This area has been sodded two years ago but just keep having problems with the grass because it doesnt hold any water so i will need to kill off the grass first. will the raspberry take over the grass quickly, dont want to have to deal with a bunch of grass growing all up through the area. also if i was to use a fabric then the raspberry would not be able to spread am i right about this thought.

The creeping raspberry is non-invasive. Therefore it will not choke out any plants around it. It may grow around the base, but it will not climb as a vine of ivy would. My only complaint about junipers are their slower growth rate, along with the pruning requirements to keep them looking neat. As I stated before, the raspberry is easily edged with a stick edger once in a while and will create a nice "mat" area in the bed. Your juniper will tend to allow weeds and grass to grow through it even once matured. As for putting the mat down under the raspberry - there should be no problem with it growing on top. It will still use it's rhizomes and runners to penetrate through the mat, much like annual weeds do when they begin to grow in the mulch on top of matting.

Making a couple of applications of glyphosate on the existing grass, ten days apart, should be sufficient to insure the current vegetation is dead and will not regrow. (Assuming you are licensed) This way, you will not have the added expense of the fabric. Then you'll only need to wait 3 days and begin planting your plants.

Have any pics of the project?

lawn crafters
02-24-2009, 07:01 PM
put a few small retaining walls, then each individual bed will be almost flat, just an idea, it will cosrt alot to do though

lawn dogg
02-24-2009, 07:14 PM
The creeping raspberry is non-invasive. Therefore it will not choke out any plants around it. It may grow around the base, but it will not climb as a vine of ivy would. My only complaint about junipers are their slower growth rate, along with the pruning requirements to keep them looking neat. As I stated before, the raspberry is easily edged with a stick edger once in a while and will create a nice "mat" area in the bed. Your juniper will tend to allow weeds and grass to grow through it even once matured. As for putting the mat down under the raspberry - there should be no problem with it growing on top. It will still use it's rhizomes and runners to penetrate through the mat, much like annual weeds do when they begin to grow in the mulch on top of matting.

Making a couple of applications of glyphosate on the existing grass, ten days apart, should be sufficient to insure the current vegetation is dead and will not regrow. (Assuming you are licensed) This way, you will not have the added expense of the fabric. Then you'll only need to wait 3 days and begin planting your plants.

Have any pics of the project?

No pic's will try to get some tomorrow. Thanks

AmGreen
02-24-2009, 08:30 PM
put a few small retaining walls, then each individual bed will be almost flat, just an idea, it will cosrt alot to do though

As stated previously, be careful with adding "permanent structures" as there may be permits or engineering involved. Not to mention any other licensing requirements in your area. Trust me, you don't want to build something like that and have it fall for whatever reason. If it does and you didn't do your homework/paperwork, you'll wish you did.

yardatwork
02-24-2009, 08:56 PM
Lay down the fabric and use fabric pins to hold it in place (start from the bottom up just like roof shingles). Then roll chicken wire (yep, the stuff used for chicken coops) over top of the fabric and use more pins to hold the chicken wire in place. Then throw your mulch on top. The mulch will not wash away cause it'll get hung up in the chicken wire. The wire is also easy to snip through if you need holes for planting. I've done jobs like this in the past and it works.

The Elements Group
02-24-2009, 08:59 PM
cypress mulch... and creeping raspberry, boulders, trailing rosemary,...grassses. ... muhley, zebra etc.. good luck

lawn crafters
02-24-2009, 09:00 PM
As stated previously, be careful with adding "permanent structures" as there may be permits or engineering involved. Not to mention any other licensing requirements in your area. Trust me, you don't want to build something like that and have it fall for whatever reason. If it does and you didn't do your homework/paperwork, you'll wish you did.

o i didnt read the previous posts i just read the first one

lawn dogg
02-24-2009, 09:03 PM
As stated previously, be careful with adding "permanent structures" as there may be permits or engineering involved. Not to mention any other licensing requirements in your area. Trust me, you don't want to build something like that and have it fall for whatever reason. If it does and you didn't do your homework/paperwork, you'll wish you did.

We discussed a wall, we have installed them before in similar situations but here I cant build any structures since its in front of the house and the property is part of the town easement. The town will allow improvements but would hate if they came thru and put a drain or something thru there, at least i can dig the plants up and use them elsewhere.

lawn dogg
02-24-2009, 09:10 PM
Lay down the fabric and use fabric pins to hold it in place (start from the bottom up just like roof shingles). Then roll chicken wire (yep, the stuff used for chicken coops) over top of the fabric and use more pins to hold the chicken wire in place. Then throw your mulch on top. The mulch will not wash away cause it'll get hung up in the chicken wire. The wire is also easy to snip through if you need holes for planting. I've done jobs like this in the past and it works.


I thought about that idea seems very logical just never have tried it. you say it works pretty well, I would think that you would use the thinnest wire available and not galvanized.

shovelracer
02-24-2009, 10:28 PM
There were some OK suggestions, but walls and mass plantings can be expensive. The wall was ruled out already. Mulch would be better raw than with fabric or wire in the long run. You can install erosion boards if it is that steep. For the record I would never use wire like described. Rock is a good choice, but very labor intensive, and if it is a south facing slope it will cook the plants pretty good.

You say it was sod, around here that would most likely be bluegrass. This is your problem. I would wipe that out and install a species with less water and nutrient requirements. Maybe look at your area options for tall fescue.

Just some thoughts. Areas like this can easily suck up a lot of money and the end result is something that is going to get pounded with salt, grit, and the occasional swerving car. JMO

lawn dogg
02-24-2009, 10:48 PM
There were some OK suggestions, but walls and mass plantings can be expensive. The wall was ruled out already. Mulch would be better raw than with fabric or wire in the long run. You can install erosion boards if it is that steep. For the record I would never use wire like described. Rock is a good choice, but very labor intensive, and if it is a south facing slope it will cook the plants pretty good.

You say it was sod, around here that would most likely be bluegrass. This is your problem. I would wipe that out and install a species with less water and nutrient requirements. Maybe look at your area options for tall fescue.

Just some thoughts. Areas like this can easily suck up a lot of money and the end result is something that is going to get pounded with salt, grit, and the occasional swerving car. JMO

Its turf type tall fescue sod that we installed about 2 years ago it just doesnt do well, doesnt hold enough water and it gets direct morning sun up until about noon or so. Thats why im looking to put in something that can tolorate dry and poor soil conditions. Why wouldnt you use the wire because of the plants or is it just a pina.

AmGreen
02-24-2009, 11:20 PM
I love the chicken wire idea. If it fits in the budget you may want to do it. However, I would still leave out the fabric. If the slope is having a hard enough time maintaining an installed turf grass, chances are with a thick layer of mulch, you're not going to get many weeds growing anyway. Simply a waste of money to buy a fairly expensive material (in my opinion). Maybe another idea would be to put a thin layer of mulch down, then the chicken wire, then another thin layer on top.

shovelracer
02-25-2009, 12:41 AM
I will say the wire is innovative, and that I have never tried that in particular. However I have seen how it peels apart and rusts fairly easily. I would fear the day the call comes in cause it exposed all over after a good weed pulling session, or the neighbors kid slices his leg wide open on the rusty cage. I see it as a liability issue and that is the only reason.

White Gardens
02-25-2009, 12:58 AM
I will say the wire is innovative, and that I have never tried that in particular. However I have seen how it peels apart and rusts fairly easily. I would fear the day the call comes in cause it exposed all over after a good weed pulling session, or the neighbors kid slices his leg wide open on the rusty cage. I see it as a liability issue and that is the only reason.

I agree, chicken wire tends to fall apart fairly fast.

I liked the ideas about the creeping juniper and focal points. I think that's going to be about the easiest way to achieve what your looking.

Another idea would be carpet grass, I like the look of it.

I also agree with the other posts, if you go rock use fabric, if you go mulch then I wouldn't use any fabric. If you can, try to find some twice to three times shredded hardwood. It tends to "pack" well and hold on hills. Any cheap mulch will wash away.

I wouldn't worry too much about moisture conditions. As long as you use hardy plants you'll be OK, and with either mulch or fabric, you'll be able to keep a better moisture level in the area.

I personally don't like the idea of a creeping raspberry. The only reason I say that is around here we get wild strawberries that grow fairly easily, so the the whole creeping fruit is kinda looked upon as a "weedy" type look. All depends on your area though, and what your customers are looking for.

GracesLandscaping
02-25-2009, 01:21 AM
I personally don't like the idea of a creeping raspberry. The only reason I say that is around here we get wild strawberries that grow fairly easily, so the the whole creeping fruit is kinda looked upon as a "weedy" type look. All depends on your area though, and what your customers are looking for.

I agree with the "weedy" look... and not to mention what a PITA stuff like that is when leaf collection time comes around

btammo
02-25-2009, 08:00 AM
If you plant grass can you even mow it on that slope? there is no sense in planting any kind of grass if you cant mow it. Junipers, some boulders, mix in some clumps of perennials for a little color and possibly some upright evergreens for structure. Good luck