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RandalatA1Sprinklers
02-23-2009, 09:11 AM
I am just curious how long all you guys have been in business, how did you get into the business, what kinds of tools you guys had when you got into the business, and how the business has expanded since. When I say guys, that also includes you irrigation girl. :waving:

bicmudpuppy
02-23-2009, 09:36 AM
Ok, I'll bite, but I promise that I'm not the norm. I started "stomping" sprinklers when I was around 6. I could go to the golf course with my Dad and help with the first round of evening watering. Stomping around in the dark looking for a quick coupler was a lot of fun for a little kid. When he would let me hang around, I was the gopher for repairs. "hand me those pliers", "give me that coupler", "I need the glue cans", etc. I turned old enough to get paid for it, and I was the SJS. The bosses son is one of two people. He is either the laziest brat you ever saw, or he is the "go to" guy for every crap job down the pipe. Pop was airborne army and later a drill instructor..........yep, silver spoon guy........NOT. I worked 2000 hours the year I turned 13. I drove the truck to work so everyone would think I was 16, until the plate started to rust and he was afraid we would get pulled over to be told to get a new one. At 13, I was cutting and threading galvy swing joints. Trenching in 2" laterals, etc. By the time I was 16, I had been blown off the 460 pump station twice, and was a fair pump mechanic. (460 "teaches" you to respect it :) ) I learned most of the basics on an irrigation system that had its last update before I was born and was almost 20 years old when it was "updated". There aren't a lot of systems that were put in anywhere prior to '47 and updated in '67. I left the course to "go my own way" in '91. Irrigation service paid better than golf. In 2000, we lost Dad. At the funeral, I told several of the old guard that I was not interested in going back to golf (several of you should laugh now). I said "you can't afford it". At the time, I was very happy driving a well supplied service truck and making 30%. Life happens and I'm back in golf. It is where my heart is. I love 100 hour weeks. Watching the sun rise and set day after day. There is nothing better for the soul than watching irrigation run in the pre-dawn glow, or as those first heads start to run of an evening with the sun sinking in the back ground.

RandalatA1Sprinklers
02-23-2009, 10:07 AM
Ok, I'll bite, but I promise that I'm not the norm. I started "stomping" sprinklers when I was around 6. I could go to the golf course with my Dad and help with the first round of evening watering. Stomping around in the dark looking for a quick coupler was a lot of fun for a little kid. When he would let me hang around, I was the gopher for repairs. "hand me those pliers", "give me that coupler", "I need the glue cans", etc. I turned old enough to get paid for it, and I was the SJS. The bosses son is one of two people. He is either the laziest brat you ever saw, or he is the "go to" guy for every crap job down the pipe. Pop was airborne army and later a drill instructor..........yep, silver spoon guy........NOT. I worked 2000 hours the year I turned 13. I drove the truck to work so everyone would think I was 16, until the plate started to rust and he was afraid we would get pulled over to be told to get a new one. At 13, I was cutting and threading galvy swing joints. Trenching in 2" laterals, etc. By the time I was 16, I had been blown off the 460 pump station twice, and was a fair pump mechanic. (460 "teaches" you to respect it :) ) I learned most of the basics on an irrigation system that had its last update before I was born and was almost 20 years old when it was "updated". There aren't a lot of systems that were put in anywhere prior to '47 and updated in '67. I left the course to "go my own way" in '91. Irrigation service paid better than golf. In 2000, we lost Dad. At the funeral, I told several of the old guard that I was not interested in going back to golf (several of you should laugh now). I said "you can't afford it". At the time, I was very happy driving a well supplied service truck and making 30%. Life happens and I'm back in golf. It is where my heart is. I love 100 hour weeks. Watching the sun rise and set day after day. There is nothing better for the soul than watching irrigation run in the pre-dawn glow, or as those first heads start to run of an evening with the sun sinking in the back ground.


I know what you mean about 100 hour weeks. I would not know what to do if I had a "normal" 40 hour week. Summer time I am lucky to see my own house in the light of day. The more I work, the more I want. I was landscape superintendent at a 160 acre resort for 13 years. It was also so awesome and peaceful watching the sun come up. Then the school buses would pull up and 3,000 screaming kids would attack the place and destroy the mini golf course and tromp all over the landscape. New ownership with idiots made me re-analyze what I was doing, now here I am.