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FIMCO-MEISTER
02-27-2009, 04:00 PM
I'm trying to buy a really neat property that has a house, workshop, etc. Everybody has been scared off because of the water situation. It used to have a spring fed well. Not very deep from looking in the casing. After a big flood something happened and the well quit getting spring water so the previous owner put in a 1000 gallon cistern. Wells further up the canyon have gone dry over time but as far as I know this one was caused by the flood. In the ditch beside the property along the road I see water pools. We've have had no rain. The house next door has a working well. I'm offering a price that if i don't ever get a well put in it would still be worth owning the place even if I have to haul water in to the cistern. I'm trying to get a mortgage with an extra 20,000 for trying to get a well put in. They don't have a aquifer here it is just water in fractured rock. just below this house is a smaller canyon running perpendicular to the main canyon. Since i have a cistern with a pressure tank and pump all in good shape I'm thinking even if I only manage to get a well that has a low recharge rate I'm in good shape. The house needs some other stuff done but the water situation is the big bullet. I don't have my cables to put pics up. Sorry.

hoskm01
02-27-2009, 04:04 PM
I'm trying to buy a really neat property that has a house, workshop, etc. Everybody has been scared off because of the water situation. It used to have a spring fed well. Not very deep from looking in the casing. After a big flood something happened and the well quit getting spring water so the previous owner put in a 1000 gallon cistern. Wells further up the canyon have gone dry over time but as far as I know this one was caused by the flood. In the ditch beside the property along the road I see water pools. We've have had no rain. The house next door has a working well. I'm offering a price that if i don't ever get a well put in it would still be worth owning the place even if I have to haul water in to the cistern. I'm trying to get a mortgage with an extra 20,000 for trying to get a well put in. They don't have a aquifer here it is just water in fractured rock. just below this house is a smaller canyon running perpendicular to the main canyon. Since i have a cistern with a pressure tank and pump all in good shape I'm thinking even if I only manage to get a well that has a low recharge rate I'm in good shape. The house needs some other stuff done but the water situation is the big bullet. I don't have my cables to put pics up. Sorry.
Sounds just as described yesterday, Pete.

Id like to get up there and see it if you are able to pull the trigger on it.

And count me in for some winter house work.

FIMCO-MEISTER
02-27-2009, 04:09 PM
Sounds just as described yesterday, Pete.

Id like to get up there and see it if you are able to pull the trigger on it.

And count me in for some winter house work.

I hope this works out. Really cool place awesome shop. ping pong table city. I may rent the shop out to help pay for improvements. no real neighbors and you feel like you are in the mountains but only 20 minutes from Fort Collins.

hoskm01
02-27-2009, 04:17 PM
I hope this works out. Really cool place awesome shop. ping pong table city. I may rent the shop out to help pay for improvements. no real neighbors and you feel like you are in the mountains but only 20 minutes from Fort Collins.
PM me the address? Wanna peep the aerials.

Wet_Boots
02-27-2009, 04:20 PM
Aren't there systems for total water recycling? Specifically made for these remote cabins?

fl-landscapes
02-27-2009, 04:22 PM
Aren't there systems for total water recycling? Specifically made for these remote cabins?

Think they are BIG Bucks

FIMCO-MEISTER
02-27-2009, 04:26 PM
Aren't there systems for total water recycling? Specifically made for these remote cabins?

Does it require harvesting snow or rainwater? Not legal here. If I have to use the cistern I'm doing all peeing outdoors.

Wet_Boots
02-27-2009, 04:36 PM
The systems I read about basically allow you to drink your own wee-wee, as they finish off with a membrane filter. I heard about them before the current trend of banning rainwater collection, so I don't know how that affects the picture.

hoskm01
02-27-2009, 08:10 PM
The systems I read about basically allow you to drink your own wee-wee, as they finish off with a membrane filter. I heard about them before the current trend of banning rainwater collection, so I don't know how that affects the picture.
No thanks. No shampoo or dishwater in my drink, either.

Wet_Boots
02-27-2009, 08:17 PM
None of it can get through the final filtration, so big whoop. If you examine a map of sewage treatment plants and water-department river intakes, you can see that everyone is drinking wee-wee anyhow, if at a greater distance.

DanaMac
02-28-2009, 09:14 AM
Who needs water anyway? I thought we all drank and bathed in beer and wine? Water is for lawns, not drinking or farming.

AI Inc
02-28-2009, 09:40 AM
February 2004
Events News Archive Home Page About Us Advertising Info Community Page

Pleasant Valley Pipeline: buried treasure in Bellvue
By Cherry Sokoloski
North Forty News
It takes a lot of work, a lot of time and a lot of steel to get water where it's needed along the fast-growing Front Range. It also takes a lot of patience, with the Preble's jumping mouse appearing at every turn to challenge engineers.

One big project, the Pleasant Valley Pipeline, wraps up this month after six years of planning and almost a year of construction. The underground pipeline will bring additional water to Fort Collins, Greeley and the Tri-Districts, which include East Larimer County, Fort Collins-Loveland and North Weld County. The Northern Colorado Water Conservancy District coordinated the project.

The pipeline runs from the Munroe Canal northwest of Ted's Place to a point west of Laporte Avenue, where it connects with an existing pipe from Horsetooth Reservoir. In the summer months, the pipeline will bring river water from the Munroe Canal to treatment plants on Laporte Avenue owned by Fort Collins and the Tri-Districts. In the winter, the system will be reversed, bringing water from Horsetooth Reservoir to Greeley's treatment plant near Ted's Place. No water will be diverted from the river during winter months. The entire system operates on gravity flow.

The Pleasant Valley pipe allows Fort Collins and the Tri-Districts to access Poudre River water through the Munroe Canal, and it also gives Greeley better access to water it owns in Horsetooth Reservoir. Greeley can now get Horsetooth water year-round, instead of just in the summer months.

With the new pipe, Fort Collins has a more reliable way to get Poudre River water to its treatment plant. Previously, it relied on two old pipelines from Gateway Mountain Park that had limited capacity plus frequent maintenance problems.

River crossing
The last big challenge for pipeline builders was crossing the Poudre River west of Ted's Place, a milestone accomplished in mid-January. The pipeline had to be buried about 10 feet below the riverbed and covered with concrete. To get the job done, workers had to divert the Poudre first to one side and then the other, with half the pipe installed at one time. Project manager Jeff Drager said the river crossing was especially challenging because, to minimize impact on the Preble's mouse, the work area along the riverbank was quite narrow.

Since March 2003, when construction began, the Pleasant Valley pipeline has marched across the Bellvue foothills with little fanfare compared with public attention focused on large reservoir projects planned for the area. But despite its low public profile, the pipeline boasts some impressive numbers. The total project cost was $30.2 million, according to Drager. The buried steel pipe is huge - 67 inches in diameter - and it stretches over 8.7 miles. It has a capacity to deliver 120 million gallons of water per day, mostly during summer months when demand is high. Besides crossing the Poudre River, an undertaking that required 700 cubic yards of concrete, the pipeline also crossed canals in six locations. About 40 easements had to be negotiated for the project.

Most important, the additional water that is now available to municipal users is significant. "For the participants," said Drager, "it's going to really make a difference in the reliability of their water supply systems."

One of those participants is the East Larimer County Water District, which serves subdivisions north and east of Fort Collins. Until now, ELCO was solely dependent on Colorado-Big Thompson water from Horsetooth Reservoir, because there was no way to deliver river water to its treatment plant on Laporte Avenue.

The district has already seen a big change in its operation as a result of the Pleasant Valley pipeline. "Our motivation was to wean ourselves from C-BT water for future customers," said ELCO general manager Webb Jones. He predicts that the availability of C-BT water will become extremely limited in the next 10 to 20 years, and the water will be prohibitively expensive.

ELCO acquires water rights from developers, who must provide water to go along with new residential or commercial developments. "Until we had the Pleasant Valley Pipeline, we couldn't take any river water rights," Jones explained.

As a result of the pipeline project, ELCO has acquired shares of Poudre River irrigation water equal to about 1,400 acre-feet, a sizable addition to its 3,900 acre-feet of C-BT water. The district is now in the process of converting the ag water to municipal use through the water court. The new water rights are adequate for about 4,000 homes, Webb said, "enough capacity to take care of future demands."

Webb, whose district invested $3 million in the pipeline, said it "opens up more development possibilities," since a good deal of land in development's path has river water rights attached to it. Since river water costs less than C-BT water, Webb hopes the new pipeline will help keep homes more affordable.

Less water for rafting
While water districts are delighted to have the additional water, rafters could notice a negative impact. Water for the pipeline is diverted into the Munroe Canal about 1 mile above the new Gateway Mountain Park, resulting in lower streamflows during the peak runoff months of May, June and July. For fishermen, conditions could actually improve during the runoff period since the water will be lower, but fall water levels will also be lower than before.

Use of the pipeline is expected to increase gradually for several years, according to Drager. At full capacity, September streamflow could be reduced by 24 percent below Gateway Mountain Park.

During pipeline construction, Bingham Hill Road was closed for 12 weeks, but Drager said he received no complaints from residents.

Two contractors built the Pleasant Valley Pipeline - High Country Pipeline of Penrose and Barnard Construction of Bozeman, Mont.

DanaMac
02-28-2009, 10:00 AM
It takes a lot of work, a lot of time and a lot of steel to get water where it's needed along the fast-growing Front Range. It also takes a lot of patience, with the Preble's jumping mouse appearing at every turn to challenge engineers.


The Preble's jumping mouse does create problems. There are certain times of the year that construction can be done where they are present. So on large sites, such as the interchange exit that I take everyday that is under construction, they have to work around it. That means doing work in that area for a few months, pulling off that area for a few months, and go back later to the same area. It does run up costs.

But, I'm a bit of a bleeding heart, liberal tree hugger. No point killing off animals for our driving pleasure.

FIMCO-MEISTER
03-02-2009, 10:15 AM
Poudre River is not a heavy flow river. I can walk across it in parts. If they are depending on it for all NE CO growth they are in trouble regardless of future Dams.

Waterit
03-02-2009, 10:17 AM
Save water. Drink beer, pee outdoors, bathe only when it rains.

hoskm01
03-02-2009, 10:19 AM
Poudre River is not a heavy flow river. I can walk across it in parts. If they are depending on it for all NE CO growth they are in trouble regardless of future Dams.
They haven't turned it on yet. Summer will see some flows.