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holly123
02-28-2009, 11:04 AM
Hi I live in maryland and would like to know if its okay to overseed and fertilize lawns at the same time thanks

BIOGRASS
02-28-2009, 02:16 PM
What kind of fertilizer would you be using? Avoid using a pre-emergent and/or broadleaf weed killers. You will not get anything done with those combined.

I would recommend a natural fertilizer (Sustane 4-6-4 ) or a mineral based smart synthetic fertilizer (Best 16-16-16). I hope that helps...

kenny s
03-01-2009, 09:55 AM
Biograss,
I read your answer to Holly123 and you mentioned a natural fertilizer (Sustane 4-6-4). Is this considered a starter fertilizer to help the new seeding germinate? Than you mentioned a synthetic fertilizer smart mineral based fertilizer - Best 16-16-16, which is alot higher in nitrogen than the 4-6-4. Can you elaborate on the two different kinds of fertilizer? Thank you, Kenny S.

kenny s
03-01-2009, 10:13 AM
holly123,
Hi, I am from NJ and just started doing some powerseeding myself. What kind of powerseeder are you going to use? Are you doing a large area, complete lawn, small area? I bought the Lawn Solutions Turf Revitilizer last fall, (9 hp), and I love it. It is so smooth to operated with the hydrostatic drive, (forward and reverse). If you are going to rent one, if you can find where the Turf Revitilizer is rented, you might want to consider it, it will make you experience alot more pleasant. There are others that do a good job as well. I do not know if you are a homeowner or contractor, but they have a 6hp and a 9hp, and both work very well. The 6hp is alittle smaller in size, so if your a homeowner and doing just your own lawn, if this one is available to you, it should be a consideration. To help with your ?? about fertilizing when you overseed, you must fertilize the new seeding with a starter fertilizer. Again, I am new to this so I only know what I have learned on this site, so ask any of the more experienced contractors on this site and I am sure you will get numerous replies that will help you out tremendously. I still am learning about my powerseeder and how to use it properly, what the ideal depth to set it at for seeding, etc. Ask your ??'s, no matter how silly they may seem to you. Remember everyone on this site had to learn by asking ??'s and doing things over again until they found what worked for them consistantly. Good luck, Kenny s.

rcreech
03-01-2009, 10:50 AM
When using a starter fert you want a well balance fertilizer!

The triple 12, 15's etc isn't your best source by any means for starter fert. They are just a gereral use fert and about the only thing I would use it on is a garden or pasture.

Again...a well balance fert would contain a good ratio.

I really like 18-24-12 (50% SCU) or something like it. I would definitly recommend an SCU also.

Put on during seeding and then come back in 3-4 weeks later with another app.

A good starter fertilizer will cost a little more per bag but the use rate is much less, you are supplying the turf with what it needs.

kenny s
03-01-2009, 11:40 AM
rcreech,
The 18-24-12 50% SCU is your recommendation for a starter fert. to use when oeverseeding with a machine? Can I purchase this at Lesco? Is it a specific brand name, or do many fert. mfg's make it? I do not mean to claim ignorance, but I am new to this overseeding service. I only bought my Lawn Solutions Revitilizer, (9hp), last fall, so I am really just learning this application. I can use all the advise I can get. In your opinion, what is the best depth to set machine for planting seed? I have core aerated a couple of the lawns I have slice seeded, but as of yet I have not gotten great results. I have no control of the watering process on customers lawns except to tell them not to drench the areas at first, and to keep the area moist all the time. I am sure you know from being in business, that the homeowner is not going to go out of their way to make sure the newly seeded areas are watered properly for a couple of weeks when it is critical. Also I have read on this site by others about applying a top cover on the areas. Some have mentioned a mulch covering? What specific kind of mulch are they referring? Is peat moss okay to cover with? This could be costly if you have to cover an entire lawn. Normally on newly planted lawns, where topsoil is used and seed planted on top of it, bales of hay are used to cover the areas, but that is in northern New Jersey where I live. The machine Mfg. does not mention anything about having to apply a cover to the areas, is this optional? Thank you, Kenny S.

rcreech
03-01-2009, 11:49 AM
rcreech,
The 18-24-12 50% SCU is your recommendation for a starter fert. to use when oeverseeding with a machine? Can I purchase this at Lesco? Is it a specific brand name, or do many fert. mfg's make it? I do not mean to claim ignorance, but I am new to this overseeding service. I only bought my Lawn Solutions Revitilizer, (9hp), last fall, so I am really just learning this application. I can use all the advise I can get. In your opinion, what is the best depth to set machine for planting seed? I have core aerated a couple of the lawns I have slice seeded, but as of yet I have not gotten great results. I have no control of the watering process on customers lawns except to tell them not to drench the areas at first, and to keep the area moist all the time. I am sure you know from being in business, that the homeowner is not going to go out of their way to make sure the newly seeded areas are watered properly for a couple of weeks when it is critical. Also I have read on this site by others about applying a top cover on the areas. Some have mentioned a mulch covering? What specific kind of mulch are they referring? Is peat moss okay to cover with? This could be costly if you have to cover an entire lawn. Normally on newly planted lawns, where topsoil is used and seed planted on top of it, bales of hay are used to cover the areas, but that is in northern New Jersey where I live. The machine Mfg. does not mention anything about having to apply a cover to the areas, is this optional? Thank you, Kenny S.

Kenny,

1) 18-24-12 is just an analysis as anyone can blend it with SCU.
I personally use Lesco as they have an awesome product but it doesn't have to be theirs.

2) As far as seeding depth, I would say 1/8" to 1/4" is perfect but you may have to go a little deeper to get the "lower areas".

I slice seed going in two directions and then broadcast the last 1/4 or 1/3 over the top.

3) I seed betwen 20-30 acres/year and have NEVER broadcasted or topdressed them with anything.

Is it a good think? I don't know...but it sure isn't practical and I have AWESOME lawns without it!

Let me know if you have any more questions or need any help!

Glad to hear you got a Turf Revitalizer...as that seems like an awesome machine!

Smallaxe
03-01-2009, 06:15 PM
The best overseeding sytem I have ever seen is a layer of compostted something or other, as a cover for germination. Compost also supplies a 'Plant Ready' nutrient base that gets the seedlings off to a good start.

Non-burning it is - so it helps rather than hinders the delicate root hairs surviving on the 'endosperm' of the seed. Unless you are seeding an area completely void of NPK and friends, I would not take the chance of burning the spot that the fertilizer pellet sits on.
Just my $.02. :)

BIOGRASS
03-02-2009, 06:42 PM
Kenny,

I recommended the 2 blends due to the success I have had with 4-6-4 and 16-16-16.

kenny s
03-02-2009, 07:47 PM
Thank you Clark, I appreciate your help.
Kenny S.

Marcos
03-02-2009, 08:09 PM
The best overseeding sytem I have ever seen is a layer of compostted something or other, as a cover for germination. Compost also supplies a 'Plant Ready' nutrient base that gets the seedlings off to a good start.

Non-burning it is - so it helps rather than hinders the delicate root hairs surviving on the 'endosperm' of the seed. Unless you are seeding an area completely void of NPK and friends, I would not take the chance of burning the spot that the fertilizer pellet sits on.
Just my $.02. :)

Oh so true...:)

And if I know for sure the specific piece of ground's going to be managed organically from that point onward, I will incorporate an application of beneficial endo-mycorrhizae spores in a liquid form, just prior to seeding and after final grading.

"Endos-" are a proven method to stimulate root growth in turf, as well as tropicals and many monocots.
"Ectos-" spur on the root system of virtually everything else, particularly dicots.

Thing is...pesticides & salts (fertilizers) work to bring on the gradual decline or death of these spores when they're routinely applied to areas where they, in effect, act as an "interface" with the soil.

Smallaxe
03-03-2009, 07:19 AM
Oh so true...:)

And if I know for sure the specific piece of ground's going to be managed organically from that point onward, I will incorporate an application of beneficial endo-mycorrhizae spores in a liquid form, just prior to seeding and after final grading.

"Endos-" are a proven method to stimulate root growth in turf, as well as tropicals and many monocots.
"Ectos-" spur on the root system of virtually everything else, particularly dicots.

Thing is...pesticides & salts (fertilizers) work to bring on the gradual decline or death of these spores when they're routinely applied to areas where they, in effect, act as an "interface" with the soil.

Exactly. :) With P bans coming on board all over the country, because its polluting, is not needed in most soils, yet excessive P inactivates those AMs.

I personally believe that the P bans are crap, and will help little, but when you read how it is used for lawns...
Well, I guess we have it coming...