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Mike Leary
03-01-2009, 02:24 PM
Starting to get hot; in the high eighties today, but the flowers are starting up.
Oleander, pink and white (the pink smells like vanilla). Creosote bush, yellow,
and a couple maybe Matt knows. Into the nineties tomorrow, phew!

DanaMac
03-01-2009, 02:32 PM
70s or so here on Tuesday. People are going to get tempted to turn the systems on, and I'll accommodate them. And then fix the damage a few weeks later. But if I don't, I really believe some plants will start stressing. Turf should still be ok, but it couldn't hurt to water it too.

hoskm01
03-01-2009, 02:42 PM
Cape Honeysuckle and Bougainvilla are the last two.


Was watchin the news last night and they were talking about how warm and dry this winter has been. Said in '03, at this time, we had the same amount of snow (very little) season to date, and ended up with 40 or so inches during March and April. Outlook is dry and warm, but a surprise could swoop in; not sure if I want one or not.

Wet_Boots
03-01-2009, 02:43 PM
Sub-freezing and another half-a-foot or more of snow to come ~ Bah Humbug!! :realmad:

Mike Leary
03-01-2009, 02:56 PM
The next two weeks will tell us if a wildflower bonanza occurs and then we'll bail for Las Cruces, have not been that way in the spring before.

Kiril
03-01-2009, 02:59 PM
But if I don't, I really believe some plants will start stressing. Turf should still be ok, but it couldn't hurt to water it too.

Not following you here. Turf should be pretty much the first plant in a landscape that requires water in the spring, not the other way around.

BrandonV
03-01-2009, 03:51 PM
well so far we've gotten 1.2" of rain today, and it's a cool 36˚... just spent an hour out in it to go around and shut all the houses... calling for 3-8" of snow tonight and therefore needed to shut the houses because having the doors shut helps a little on preventing cave-ins. burrrrr.

DanaMac
03-01-2009, 04:11 PM
Not following you here. Turf should be pretty much the first plant in a landscape that requires water in the spring, not the other way around.

At this time of year the Kentucky bluegrass still does ok, except in high traffic areas. it still rebounds just fine with weak winters. Usually. But I've seen more shrubs not rebound and leaf out in the spring when they don't get much moisture in the winter. Or else they bud out later than usual.

Wet_Boots
03-01-2009, 04:21 PM
well so far we've gotten 1.2" of rain today, and it's a cool 36˚... just spent an hour out in it to go around and shut all the houses... calling for 3-8" of snow tonight and therefore needed to shut the houses because having the doors shut helps a little on preventing cave-ins. burrrrr.Who the hell leaves all the doors open?

DanaMac
03-01-2009, 04:24 PM
Who the hell leaves all the doors open?

Yeah I'm not sure what he means by leaving the doors open. Pump houses?

Mike Leary
03-01-2009, 04:54 PM
Yeah I'm not sure what he means by leaving the doors open. Pump houses?

They must have greenhouse/hot houses.

BrandonV
03-01-2009, 10:43 PM
yeah greenhouses... I'm the slacker that's trying to inherit the big nursery remember?? this time of year is a pain, hot/cold, hot/cold, open/shut. nothing more fun that shutting 15' doors in the wind by yourself, got slapped by a few but I managed.

Wet_Boots
03-01-2009, 11:11 PM
Time to spring for those automatic shutters, or whatever they're called.

Stuttering Stan
03-01-2009, 11:23 PM
Daffodils are starting to bloom. I hate seeing it because I know work is a few weeks away. Oh well, here we go again. Another year in the biz. Whoopdeedoo!

Kiril
03-02-2009, 12:48 AM
At this time of year the Kentucky bluegrass still does ok, except in high traffic areas. it still rebounds just fine with weak winters. Usually. But I've seen more shrubs not rebound and leaf out in the spring when they don't get much moisture in the winter. Or else they bud out later than usual.

Still does not equate. There are other reasons why a plant may not "rebound" in the spring, such as soil temps, climatic conditions, etc.... One would think if your effective root zone is say 8-12", and that is sufficiently hydrated, water should not be the limiting factor. Do you have a moisture meter?

I did an experiment one year on a clients property where I left the irrigation off until I started to see wilting in the majority of the plants. Guess when that occurred? (on average, we stop getting rain in this area in March)

DanaMac
03-02-2009, 09:28 AM
Still does not equate. There are other reasons why a plant may not "rebound" in the spring, such as soil temps, climatic conditions, etc.... One would think if your effective root zone is say 8-12", and that is sufficiently hydrated, water should not be the limiting factor. Do you have a moisture meter?

I did an experiment one year on a clients property where I left the irrigation off until I started to see wilting in the majority of the plants. Guess when that occurred? (on average, we stop getting rain in this area in March)

I'm just telling you what I have SEEN. Not what is logical in books and readings.

DanaMac
03-02-2009, 09:59 AM
Kiril - here is what I am theorizing. I am no mathemagician, nor am I a rocket surgeon. :)

The kentucky bluegrass, once it goes dormant, does not tend to green back up just because it is warm and dry. It tends to stay dormant. But many of the plants and shrubs will come out of dormant stage and bud out very early if it is unusually warm and dry. And then if they are budding and trying to grow, and they don't get the water needed, they stress even more, and earlier than they should. Thus leading to more plants dieing than turf in a dry winter.

The grass stays healthier because it will stay in it's hibernation/dormancy phase. Rather than come out and play when there is no water.

Don't get into a big p****** match with me about it. I'm just telling you what I have seen, and what I am theorizing. No scientific data to back it up. But I have seen more shrubs die than grass in warm dry winters. We get grass winter kill sporadically no matter what we get in the winter.

CAPT Stream Rotar
03-02-2009, 10:24 AM
nice find Leary..

Kiril
03-02-2009, 11:06 AM
Don't get into a big p****** match with me about it. I'm just telling you what I have seen, and what I am theorizing. No scientific data to back it up. But I have seen more shrubs die than grass in warm dry winters. We get grass winter kill sporadically no matter what we get in the winter.

I'm not looking for a pissing match, just trying to understand how deep rooted plants will require water before shallow rooted plants.

Waterit
03-02-2009, 11:06 AM
40's and 50's here, snowed just north of us, but supposed to be in the 70's by the weekend.

Sure wish spring would get here already, I'm sick of being home by lunch or never leaving the house in the first place.

Wet_Boots
03-02-2009, 11:34 AM
I'm not looking for a pissing match, just trying to understand how deep rooted plants will require water before shallow rooted plants.Who says the plants are deep-rooted?

Simple truth ~ grass goes dormant, shrubs go dead.

DanaMac
03-02-2009, 11:44 AM
I'm not looking for a pissing match, just trying to understand how deep rooted plants will require water before shallow rooted plants.

Sorry, didn't really mean to put you on the defensive with my wording. We all know how some of these debates turn nasty.

DanaMac
03-02-2009, 11:46 AM
40's and 50's here, snowed just north of us, but supposed to be in the 70's by the weekend.

Sure wish spring would get here already, I'm sick of being home by lunch or never leaving the house in the first place.

Now they're calling for 70s this week. Forecast of 72 today, record is 73 from last year. My one appointment today canceled, so I'm doing busy work down at the shop. might go throw some pigtails in. After my late morning nap :sleeping:

Kiril
03-02-2009, 12:00 PM
Sorry, didn't really mean to put you on the defensive with my wording. We all know how some of these debates turn nasty.

No worries, you are not boots. Really, I am sincerely curious as to the cause of your observations.

DanaMac
03-02-2009, 12:03 PM
No worries, you are not boots. Really, I am sincerely curious as to the cause of your observations.

If I come up with the magical answer, I'll let you know.

Might also have to do with the fact that the turf usually gets fertilized 1-4 times a year, depending on the homeowner or maintenance company. And the shrubs and plants do not.

Wet_Boots
03-02-2009, 12:19 PM
Maybe the dead shrubs are in crappy plantings atop impermeable soil.

Mike Leary
03-02-2009, 12:43 PM
Maybe the dead shrubs are in crappy plantings atop impermeable soil.

Guess who gets the blame when crummy plant installs fail? :dizzy:

Wet_Boots
03-02-2009, 01:13 PM
Landscapers often get a free pass when they jam the rootballs into poorly draining soil.

Mike Leary
03-02-2009, 01:31 PM
Landscapers often get a free pass when they jam the rootballs into poorly draining soil.

After a few planting failures, I started writing into my contracts personal supervision of installs; things were healther after that.

AI Inc
03-02-2009, 01:33 PM
How much did you charge for that?

Kiril
03-02-2009, 01:36 PM
After a few planting failures, I started writing into my contracts personal supervision of installs; things were healther after that.

If you could only teach the dipshiit landscapers how to properly plant out, most problems would never occur.

DanaMac
03-02-2009, 01:39 PM
If you could only teach the dipshiit landscapers how to properly plant out, most problems would never occur.

You could probably teach the landscape contractor, but then teaching his workers, and getting them to do it consistently is different. Especially when the boss man is screaming down their throat to hurry up and get things done.

Mike Leary
03-02-2009, 01:44 PM
How much did you charge for that?

If it was a install crew I'd worked with, I'd only have to stop by once or
twice a day to make sure the plants were good out of the pots, $ 160.00.
Otherwise, $80.00 hr. t&m; guaranteeing the plant survival. Usually with
scabs, I'd spend two or three hours a day at the site.

DanaMac
03-03-2009, 03:48 PM
Yes spring is here WAY too early. 70s again today with good winds. and now a fire at Fort Carson. (http://www.gazette.com/news/fire_49229___article.html/carson_know.html) March better turn around soon and at least get some rain. Pikes Peak should be covered with snow now, and at the moment it looks like it should in May or June.

AI Inc
03-03-2009, 03:50 PM
We got a ft of snow yesterday. But I did have 2 start ups come in via e mail

DanaMac
03-03-2009, 04:01 PM
We got a ft of snow yesterday. But I did have 2 start ups come in via e mail

My dad was dealing with your snow yesterday. Said he had 12"-14".

I just did a couple quick service calls with one of my techs. And looked at replacing two stolen PVBs and adding security cages. On one of the calls, one zone wouldn't shut off. Well, there was still ice in the valve, preventing the diaphragm from closing. And I took apart one 1812 that wasn't spraying. It was also filled with ice.

AI Inc
03-03-2009, 04:05 PM
We always start the week of april 15th. This yr Monday is the 13th. First 2 that came in so far are in the same town , both with ext clocks. Just gave em the date , no time , no one needs to be home.

hoskm01
03-03-2009, 06:35 PM
We always start the week of april 15th. This yr Monday is the 13th. First 2 that came in so far are in the same town , both with ext clocks. Just gave em the date , no time , no one needs to be home.
Those are the best. Wish I had more like that.

Mike Leary
03-03-2009, 06:45 PM
Those are the best. Wish I had more like that.

They all should be like that; over the years the clientele should wean themselves out; the 1%ers win.

bicmudpuppy
03-04-2009, 01:22 AM
Kiril, the landscape dying vs turf dying from cold exposure isn't a water thing, but it is. Turf is more dormant (nothing above the crown really survives) than herbaceous and woody plants. These plants get dry and then freeze and it is "lights out". Also, these plants tend to be more air temp oriented than turf. In general, turf doesn't start growing until it gets the proper soil temps, but many landscape plants will "bud out" when an early warm spell comes to town. The soil warms up slowly, but those seventy degree days make shrubs want to grow. In KY as a kid, I was always amazed at the number of hollies we had winter kill. Many of those holly varieties were zone 2 or 3, but the warm/cold winters of zone 5 dropped them. I asked the woodies prof in college about it and his answer was that the hollies that were zone 3 still wanted to grow when the temps were at or slightly below freezing. A period of 50 or more degree days and above freezing nights made perfect growing weather. The problem is that in the transition zone, they can go from fifty or sixty today to single digits tomorrow with little or zero warning. Zone 2 or 3 woody ornamentals don't handle it well when "the hammer falls". That's the best I can explain it, but I've seen what Dana is describing. The turf can stress too, but it survives.

DanaMac
03-04-2009, 09:22 AM
Kiril, the landscape dying vs turf dying from cold exposure isn't a water thing, but it is. Turf is more dormant (nothing above the crown really survives) than herbaceous and woody plants. These plants get dry and then freeze and it is "lights out". Also, these plants tend to be more air temp oriented than turf. In general, turf doesn't start growing until it gets the proper soil temps, but many landscape plants will "bud out" when an early warm spell comes to town. The soil warms up slowly, but those seventy degree days make shrubs want to grow. In KY as a kid, I was always amazed at the number of hollies we had winter kill. Many of those holly varieties were zone 2 or 3, but the warm/cold winters of zone 5 dropped them. I asked the woodies prof in college about it and his answer was that the hollies that were zone 3 still wanted to grow when the temps were at or slightly below freezing. A period of 50 or more degree days and above freezing nights made perfect growing weather. The problem is that in the transition zone, they can go from fifty or sixty today to single digits tomorrow with little or zero warning. Zone 2 or 3 woody ornamentals don't handle it well when "the hammer falls". That's the best I can explain it, but I've seen what Dana is describing. The turf can stress too, but it survives.

That is what I meant to say.... :)

Tom Tom
03-04-2009, 09:43 AM
The turf can stress too, but it survives.

yup, turf is pretty resilient, especially Kentucky blue

Kiril
03-04-2009, 10:38 AM
Kiril, the landscape dying vs turf dying from cold exposure isn't a water thing, but it is. Turf is more dormant (nothing above the crown really survives) than herbaceous and woody plants. These plants get dry and then freeze and it is "lights out". Also, these plants tend to be more air temp oriented than turf. In general, turf doesn't start growing until it gets the proper soil temps, but many landscape plants will "bud out" when an early warm spell comes to town.

Ay, I know this. It is the same here, and probably anywhere where winter dormancy occurs. In fact, this very thing happened this year here with a Jan warm spell that caused some plants to come out of dormancy early, and seed I applied in Dec to germinate.

This however doesn't answer the question why they would need water. Soils dry top down and therefore your shallow root plants will require water sooner than those that are deeper rooted. Also bud swelling and early flowering does not generate a major change in transpiration, especially when temperatures are still low.

jluksic
03-04-2009, 02:21 PM
Meridian Ranch in Falcon CO was irrigating non-golf course area this morning. I think they are served by "Landtech".

DanaMac
03-04-2009, 06:40 PM
Meridian Ranch in Falcon CO was irrigating non-golf course area this morning. I think they are served by "Landtech".

I've seen quite a few apartments, HOAs, and common areas running the last couple days. We've got three whole service calls tomorrow. Woo Hoo!!

You need to post here more. We need another Colorado guy to help saturate the site. Especially since you're in Monument. Or do you just get tired of the senseless drivel we post here?

hoskm01
03-04-2009, 07:32 PM
Meridian Ranch in Falcon CO was irrigating non-golf course area this morning. I think they are served by "Landtech".

I've seen quite a few apartments, HOAs, and common areas running the last couple days. We've got three whole service calls tomorrow. Woo Hoo!!

You need to post here more. We need another Colorado guy to help saturate the site. Especially since you're in Monument. Or do you just get tired of the senseless drivel we post here?



Never seen you on here. Welcome! Colorado Rocks. Landtech blows.

jluksic
03-05-2009, 12:12 AM
4 years rebuilding the property, hundereds of feet of poly, 11+ zones, mostly HD junk heads, CSV1Z cycle stop valve, on well in KD neighborhood, still always more to do

Stuttering Stan
03-05-2009, 12:22 AM
Care to explain the manual valves?

Mike Leary
03-05-2009, 09:53 AM
What's the story with the sch 40 unions?:dizzy:

hoskm01
03-05-2009, 10:19 AM
New deck is nice!

Kiril
03-05-2009, 10:36 AM
Lots of glue .... no primer?

jluksic
03-05-2009, 01:36 PM
always primer and always glue

unions for future maintenance

Kiril
03-05-2009, 01:45 PM
Well, guess there is no questioning the PVB is 12" above the majority of the downstream outputs.

jluksic
03-05-2009, 01:45 PM
more of the same area

AI Inc
03-05-2009, 01:48 PM
That house isnt panelized construction is it?

Wet_Boots
03-05-2009, 02:00 PM
Looks like stucco over foam. I like those split-ring pipe supports. Using stainless attachment plates?

Kiril
03-05-2009, 02:15 PM
Looks like stucco over foam.

I agree .... thin coat stucco system. Hope it was done properly.

Mike Leary
03-05-2009, 02:22 PM
I agree .... thin coat stucco system. Hope it was done properly.

Boy howdy, you got that right, we had a client up north that had a new house done that way; leaked like a sieve. 125K later, it was fixed.:dizzy::cry:

Wet_Boots
03-05-2009, 02:27 PM
That stuff is difficult to attach a rain detector to.

Kiril
03-05-2009, 02:30 PM
Boy howdy, you got that right, we had a client up north that had a new house done that way; leaked like a sieve. 125K later, it was fixed.:dizzy::cry:

There have been HUGE problems and many multi-million dollar law suits as a result of poorly designed thin coat stucco systems. Problems mostly are due to the fact that stucco is intended as a water management system, and the thin coat system problems had no way of dealing with water that got past the stucco, leading to extensive mold and rot.

AI Inc
03-05-2009, 03:04 PM
That stuff is difficult to attach a rain detector to.

Masonry homes I will typicaly look for a deck , fence post ect.

AI Inc
03-05-2009, 03:05 PM
I agree .... thin coat stucco system. Hope it was done properly.

When I first got to Cali and was framing houses , I was quite shocked to only see 20% of walls plywooded , and then it was on the inside.

Mike Leary
03-05-2009, 03:40 PM
the thin coat system problems had no way of dealing with water that got past the stucco, leading to extensive mold and rot.

I spent 20 years restoring houses built in the twenties and I've never seen rot to the plates and studs as I did at the ten year old stucco home.

jluksic
03-05-2009, 04:00 PM
House and neighborhodd are 15 years old. Most if not all middle to premium homes in Colorado are stucco. This "custom builder" neighborhood is 100% 2x6 construction and 99.9% real stucco. Sun + high altitude breaks down wood and paint real fast. TREX, Correct Deck, etc... make perfect sense in the environment. The color fades fast enough that you'll never remember like-new.

Any building technique can be a problem if not installed correctly but at 7500 feet, with daily temperature swings of 70 degrees possible and low humidity, etc... stucco is the way to go.

attachment plates are copper (copper on copper)

PVB serves front, back and side yards so looks high relative to the back but meets code for the higher front yard.

1 internal and 1 external control box.

Mike Leary
03-05-2009, 04:09 PM
Seems to me, it was the 'TREX' system that failed up north.

Wet_Boots
03-05-2009, 04:10 PM
Copper plates are pretty good. I see a lot of copper-on-steel, which doesn't last. No biggie on red brick. I should look for some aluminum plates sometime.

hoskm01
03-05-2009, 04:10 PM
Nice work. Though, I think those pines and aspens are WAY TOO CLOSE to the casa. Hope youre out within 10 years.

Mike Leary
03-05-2009, 04:13 PM
Nice work. Though, I think those pines and aspens are WAY TOO CLOSE to the casa. Hope youre out within 10 years.

The aspens, especially; they are hell on foundations and drains of any kind.

jluksic
03-05-2009, 04:14 PM
forgot to mention that all the trenching was done by the cable guys who were running a thicker line to correct low SNR - they are sub contractors and own the machine so they came back the following weekend and trenched hundereds of feet

jluksic
03-05-2009, 04:29 PM
the pines/aspens might appear too close but were b and b so their root systems were very small to begin with but I did raise the pine's root-ball when planted to allow the option to move it in a few years, point taken

this is a very difficult and harsh environment to grow (zone 3)

the tricks are to take advantage of sun exposure (increase growing season), wind breaks and micro-climates + plenty of water first few years

in this area you'll see aspens planted very close to properties on southern exposure, aspens are not native under 9000 feet so they only last 20-30 years

overall growth rate is very very slow slow unlike the east coast were a stick in the ground becomes a mighty oak

junipers, pine and woody shrubs do well - pine beetle always a threat

HOA limits water usage to ~130k gallons/year

typical last frost is mid May first snow always by mid Oct

very dry and windy winter but we're still due 2 monster snows in March/April

hoskm01
03-05-2009, 04:40 PM
the pines/aspens might appear too close but were b and b so their root systems were very small to begin with but I did raise the pine's root-ball when planted to allow the option to move it in a few years, point taken

this is a very difficult and harsh environment to grow (zone 3)

the tricks are to take advantage of sun exposure (increase growing season), wind breaks and micro-climates + plenty of water first few years

in this area you'll see aspens planted very close to properties on southern exposure, aspens are not native under 9000 feet so they only last 20-30 years

overall growth rate is very very slow slow unlike the east coast were a stick in the ground becomes a mighty oak

junipers, pine and woody shrubs do well - pine beetle always a threat

HOA limits water usage to ~130k gallons/year

typical last frost is mid May first snow always by mid Oct

very dry and windy winter but we're still due 2 monster snows in March/April
Yeah, Ill believe the snow when I see it.

The Aspens definetly dont belong on the front range, though they do ok with proper care. Despite their slow growth and B&B start, roots will still be of issue. Think too of width of the tree. That ponderosa will be 30 across

Mike Leary
03-05-2009, 04:42 PM
aspens are not native under 9000 feet so they only last 20-30 years

I guess all the aspens we've seen from 4K on up were planted by Jonny Aspenseed.

DanaMac
03-05-2009, 05:17 PM
Whew!! I'm beat. Had one job today. 1.5 hours. Think I need a nap now. Gotta pace myself.

Wet_Boots
03-05-2009, 05:22 PM
Whew!! I'm beat. Had one job today. 1.5 hours. Think I need a nap now. Gotta pace myself.Take a week off. :sleeping:

DanaMac
03-05-2009, 05:24 PM
Take a week off. :sleeping:

Might just do that. Don't want to pull a hammy.

hoskm01
03-05-2009, 05:33 PM
Might just do that. Don't want to pull a hammy.
Weve been gettin into it almost 40/week the last couple weeks. I too am beat. Bed by 9 at the latest.

Mike Leary
03-05-2009, 05:37 PM
Might just do that. Don't want to pull a hammy.

I have some Rain Master hats for staying at your shop.

DanaMac
03-05-2009, 05:37 PM
Weve been gettin into it almost 40/week the last couple weeks. I too am beat. Bed by 9 at the latest.

Rob and I have actually been doing some "busy" work this week. Few repairs, organizing shop and van, installing a few pigtails, etc. Trying to give him a few hours. Hoping for a few more repair calls, But the weather is turning on Sunday.

DanaMac
03-05-2009, 05:44 PM
I have some Rain Master hats for staying at your shop.

If Bess would fit at my shop, I'd definitely let you. Guy two doors down from my shop does RV interior/carpeting work. He occasionally has one in the alley.

hoskm01
03-05-2009, 05:49 PM
If Bess would fit at my shop, I'd definitely let you. Guy two doors down from my shop does RV interior/carpeting work. He occasionally has one in the alley.
Extension cord and hose are all ready to run back down to the river. Big Thompson at the window and 80 foot trees overhead. Nothing better.

Youre welcome anytime.

DanaMac
03-05-2009, 05:51 PM
Extension cord and hose are all ready to run back down to the river. Big Thompson at the window and 80 foot trees overhead. Nothing better.

Youre welcome anytime.

Take him up on it Mikey. It's a nice area.

Mike Leary
03-05-2009, 06:04 PM
Extension cord and hose are all ready to run back down to the river. Big Thompson at the window and 80 foot trees overhead. Nothing better.

Youre welcome anytime.

Thanks, Matt, I might as well bypass Colorado Springs; they've made no better offers for the hats.

hoskm01
03-05-2009, 06:05 PM
Thanks, Matt, might as well bypass Colorado Springs; they've made no better offers for the hats.
Good people though.

DanaMac
03-05-2009, 06:09 PM
Thanks, Matt, might as well bypass Colorado Springs; they've made no better offers for the hats.

Crybaby :cry:

Mike Leary
03-05-2009, 06:35 PM
Is the KOA at 8100 Bandley Drive, Fountain, Colo. a pit?

DanaMac
03-05-2009, 06:39 PM
Is the KOA at 8100 Bandley Drive, Fountain, Colo. a pit?

Not sure if it's a pit. But I think it's pretty barren in that area. And I think that fire was very close to it the other day. Right next to Fort Carson too so you may hear some training exercises. Easy access from the intersate though. Do you only do the KOAs?

Mike Leary
03-05-2009, 06:45 PM
[QUOTE=DanaMac;2825164 Do you only do the KOAs?[/QUOTE]

We differ to our experts, got any suggestions besides your driveway?

DanaMac
03-05-2009, 06:49 PM
besides your driveway?

How long you stayin'? :)

Tom Tom
03-05-2009, 06:52 PM
How long you stayin'? :)

Party at Dana's! :drinkup:

hoskm01
03-05-2009, 07:02 PM
Party at Dana's! :drinkup:
Count me in! Il llbring the weef.

DanaMac
03-05-2009, 07:05 PM
How big is Bess? Might fit here at the house..

I don't know much about campgrounds to know what to recommend. When I camp it's with a tent and backpack. There is this one (http://www.maymuseum-camp-rvpark.com/rvpark.htm) down off HWY 115 that looks cool. Set in the foothills. But also close to Fort Carson, and I think it doesn't open until May 1st. And there is one up here in Monument, but I can't find a website or even a name for it just yet.

DanaMac
03-05-2009, 07:22 PM
http://www.coloradoheights.com/

This is the place I was thinking of, but it looks like it is more of a membership resort/campground now, and they are selling lots I believe. Not sure if they do just a few days of camping anymore. Selling to the elite only :) Damn elitists.
And the reviews were marginal.

Mike Leary
03-05-2009, 08:08 PM
How long you stayin'? :)

Until we have nothing to talk about.

DanaMac
03-05-2009, 08:11 PM
Until we have nothing to talk about.

Short stay......

Mike Leary
03-05-2009, 08:15 PM
Short stay......

Matt and I were done in about three point five minutes.

ARGOS
03-06-2009, 01:33 AM
Count me in! Il llbring the weef.

I'll bring the kids.

hoskm01
03-06-2009, 10:39 AM
Matt and I were done in about three point five minutes.
Horse feathers! You were opening another bottle of Merlot in 3.5, you forgot.

Mike Leary
03-06-2009, 10:47 AM
Horse feathers! You were opening another bottle of Merlot in 3.5, you forgot.

Yep, you were on your fifth beer as I recall.

hoskm01
03-06-2009, 11:12 AM
Not my fault theyre delicious.

Mike Leary
03-06-2009, 11:18 AM
Not my fault theyre delicious.

Congrats, almost at 3K posts! :clapping:

Dripit good
03-06-2009, 11:29 AM
Congrats, almost at 3K posts! :clapping:

Congrats hoskm!! :clapping:

Oh boy, got alot more bsing to do to for me to get anywhere near that. Not sure I got it in me!

Guess I'll continue being a fringe player......no pressure. :cool2: