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View Full Version : Dont tell me we arent running out of water


EagleLandscape
03-01-2009, 07:59 PM
Went camping in the LBJ Grasslands up near Denton this weekend. Beautiful place. All creeks and lakes have all dried up, with the exception of a few. Burn ban in effect.

All in all, great trip. Wind was 40mph+ for alot of the day, got down to 24 degrees last night. Couldnt feel my feet this morning.

EagleLandscape
03-01-2009, 08:00 PM
more.........

EagleLandscape
03-01-2009, 08:01 PM
last 2........

Mike Leary
03-01-2009, 08:07 PM
Jeez, it looks dry down there. Nice double boot shot.

hoskm01
03-01-2009, 08:09 PM
Nice boots. 2x.

EagleLandscape
03-01-2009, 08:12 PM
http://www.rei.com/product/693828

hoskm01
03-01-2009, 08:16 PM
http://www.rei.com/product/693828
Allow me to retort...


Nice shot of boots and landscape... Looks grassy.

bcg
03-01-2009, 08:29 PM
I remember back in '93 or '94 when we had a bad dry spell also. I was doing title work at the time and driving around Texas a lot. There was a lake in North Texas that essentially dried up, not a small lake either, a pretty large impoundment. Lake Houston and Lake Conroe were something like 15 or 20 feet below flood level, Lake Travis had boat ramps that you could see the end of and still had another 20 or 30 yards to get to the waters edge. Then things recovered and everything filled back up. Then we had another dry spell somewhere in 1999 - 2001 and it all happened again. Those ponds, lakes and creeks will get back to normal eventually when it starts to rain again, and eventually it will start to rain.

EagleLandscape
03-01-2009, 08:39 PM
Lake Lavon.

Apparently our Governor (Rick Perry) declared he is going to start building reservoirs again in Texas. Something that really hasnt been done in 20 years. Wonder if it's going to work this time around...

dlee1996
03-01-2009, 09:00 PM
Talking about building a reservoir and getting a reservoir are 2 different things. You get the tree huggers involved and it will take 20 years to get a lake completed. Water is getting tighter and tighter. We have the same water we have always had. The population keeps going up and the water is used quicker than mother nature can replenish it. We are really hurting her in Texas with this dry winter we have had. Sure hope come Spring we get some good floods.

It has been probably 5 years since I have been out to the grasslands. I used to live in Newark and would hit the grasslands 3 times a month. Caught lots of fish out of them ponds up there.

FIMCO-MEISTER
03-01-2009, 09:19 PM
Great pics John....

I've given to the Env. Def. League with the sole purpose of protecting the Neches River watershed from being flooded so Dallasites can water their lawn. We don't need more reservoirs. We need conservation. We haven't achieved 1/100th the conservation possible. I'm in an area that gets 15" of total rainfall and 10" of that is in snow and that is a good year. I haven't seen one friggin azalea. GET RID OF THE SWIMMING POOLS FOR GOODNESS SAKES.

bcg
03-01-2009, 09:27 PM
I think the long term solution will probably be huge water pipelines and desalinization plants. Water will necessarily be much more expensive but eventually we're going to have to do it to support the population growth. People aren't going to give up swimming pools and flowers. They might be convinced to plant regionally appropriate landscapes or harvest rainwater or A/C condensation (The A/C condensation should be collected anyway. It's astonishing to me the amount of water an A/C unit puts on in a humid area like Houston, and it's ICE cold. I think that a system could be designed that would cycle that cold water into a second coil, like a radiator, to get additional effeciency out of the unit and then the water collected somehow to be used for gray water and the savings generated would pay for the cost of implementation, but that's a whole other thing.) for watering, but you'll never get people to give up flowers entirely. It is going to be interesting to see how the new laws progress in Texas now that the MUDs have the ability to really regulate some of this stuff and are having to report their waste to the state. While there's no shortage of water in Houston, and because of that no one here has really cared about conservation, I think changes are coming.

hoskm01
03-01-2009, 09:36 PM
I think the long term solution will probably be huge water pipelines and desalinization plants. Water will necessarily be much more expensive but eventually we're going to have to do it to support the population growth. People aren't going to give up swimming pools and flowers. They might be convinced to plant regionally appropriate landscapes or harvest rainwater or A/C condensation (The A/C condensation should be collected anyway. It's astonishing to me the amount of water an A/C unit puts on in a humid area like Houston, and it's ICE cold. I think that a system could be designed that would cycle that cold water into a second coil, like a radiator, to get additional effeciency out of the unit and then the water collected somehow to be used for gray water and the savings generated would pay for the cost of implementation, but that's a whole other thing.) for watering, but you'll never get people to give up flowers entirely. It is going to be interesting to see how the new laws progress in Texas now that the MUDs have the ability to really regulate some of this stuff and are having to report their waste to the state. While there's no shortage of water in Houston, and because of that no one here has really cared about conservation, I think changes are coming.
In an extremely humid year, after an entire season of AC, and collection, what might you collect, 1000 gallons? TOPS?

Its a noble effort, but the pipe to run that water from the unit to the ground would cost ten times what that water costs now. 1000 gallons = maybe 2 bucks and change?

Water prices should be higher, I agree 100%. AC reclamation is not yet the high horse to be riding to the conservation rally.

FIMCO-MEISTER
03-01-2009, 09:54 PM
The LCRA in Austin collects 40,000 gallons a year from AC condensation. Flooding the Neches River to have water for swimming pools will be elitist environmental terrorism. Our govt. is performing theft on our childrens economic future so why not screw our children's water future while we are at it.

hoskm01
03-01-2009, 10:00 PM
The LCRA in Austin collects 40,000 gallons a year from AC condensation. Flooding the Neches River to have water for swimming pools will be elitist environmental terrorism. Our govt. is performing theft on our childrens economic future so why not screw our children's water future while we are at it.
Sure, a 20k sq ft (guessing) facility might collect that much, which is enough to fluch a lot of toilets, or water a lot of shrubs and such.

Point is, not everyone can take every measure to conserve water. If you had to choose one, or even two, would condensate collection be at the top of your list?

Stuttering Stan
03-01-2009, 10:32 PM
Great shoes. I shake my head looking at the water pics, or lack there of. Looks like another drought season. If it wasn't for the Atlantic within arms reach, I'd be out of business.Once that dries???

bcg
03-01-2009, 11:12 PM
In an extremely humid year, after an entire season of AC, and collection, what might you collect, 1000 gallons? TOPS?

Its a noble effort, but the pipe to run that water from the unit to the ground would cost ten times what that water costs now. 1000 gallons = maybe 2 bucks and change?

Water prices should be higher, I agree 100%. AC reclamation is not yet the high horse to be riding to the conservation rally.

It's not the water reclamation that would pay for the modifications, it's using that ICE cold water to boost A/C effeciency in an area that routinely reaches the mid to upper 90's for 6 months out of the year. I really think that taking the 45* - 50* air that's coming off the evaporator coil and running it through a radiator with 35* water running through it has got to drop the temp another 5* - 10*. In our area, thanks to deregulation, power rates are at least 13 cents kW/hr. At that price, something like this could save a couple hundred dollars a month. I'm saying that with the money saved by increasing energy effeciency, adding gray water collection of the A/C condensate would really be a gimmee. As far as the pipe is concernced, all A/C installations in this area have the condensate plumbed into the sanitary septic system right now so the pipe is there anyway. I'm saying instead of dumping it there, let's do something useful with it since we're installing the pipe anyway.

Obviously, what's a good solution in one place may not be a good solution everywhere. Certainly something like this would be useless in Arizona or New Mexico.

Mike Leary
03-01-2009, 11:28 PM
Certainly something like this would be useless in Arizona or New Mexico.

Or any other areas with low humidity. Damn good idea, though; the amount of
water that our roof air conditioners dump in high humidity areas is amazing.

Armadillolawncare
03-02-2009, 12:40 AM
I have those same boots for hiking. Great for carrying loads like my big butt or backpacking.

FIMCO-MEISTER
03-02-2009, 06:57 AM
Sure, a 20k sq ft (guessing) facility might collect that much, which is enough to fluch a lot of toilets, or water a lot of shrubs and such.

Point is, not everyone can take every measure to conserve water. If you had to choose one, or even two, would condensate collection be at the top of your list?

Condensation would not be at the top of my list BUT in a well designed commercial building with rain water harvesting and roof top ACs it can be part of a water source. It would certainly supply enough water for the toilet flushing. By the way one of the speakers Sat. said he was pretty certain RW harvesting was going to be allowed soon in CO.

EagleLandscape
03-02-2009, 09:10 AM
...shouldnt have opened this can of worms...

hoskm01
03-02-2009, 09:44 AM
Condensation would not be at the top of my list BUT in a well designed commercial building with rain water harvesting and roof top ACs it can be part of a water source. It would certainly supply enough water for the toilet flushing. By the way one of the speakers Sat. said he was pretty certain RW harvesting was going to be allowed soon in CO.
Well amen to that. Havent heard of any legislation coming through any channels that I pay attentionto, but I can hope it happens.

FIMCO-MEISTER
03-02-2009, 10:09 AM
Well amen to that. Havent heard of any legislation coming through any channels that I pay attentionto, but I can hope it happens.

Only problem is filling it up. If you only get 15" of moisture a small RW harvesting system is pretty worthless. So getting a large one is the only way to go inmo. Also I think it would be more practical to use the harvested RW for the toilets than out in the yard. Depends on the amount one can collect though. If I get a well put in at this place I'm hoping to get RW harvesting will be immaterial to me but I have some ideas I'm going to try out when the code changes.

DanaMac
03-02-2009, 10:53 AM
By the way one of the speakers Sat. said he was pretty certain RW harvesting was going to be allowed soon in CO.

Here are a couple local articles regarding rain water harvesting. The second one is from 2007

Rainwater harvesting bill (http://www.gazette.com/articles/tough_47395___article.html/bill_denver.html)

Gardener's try at water harvesting (http://www.gazette.com/articles/rain_24956___article.html/water_barrel.html)