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View Full Version : Need Help - Semi-Mature Leyland Cypress Trees Keep Leaning/Falling Over


mikegbuff
03-06-2009, 10:35 AM
I have 10 leyland cypress trees we planted for a client 2 years ago. There were 3 gallon size, about 4' tall at the time. They are now about 7-8' tall with thick limbs. This winter, the trees started leaning and falling over towards the ground. When I say lean, I mean the trunk is staying straight, pushing the dirt over and leaning the whole tree. The trees are not bending at an angle on the trunk. The trees do not have mulch piled against them, but are in a bed of mulch, so this may be keeping the ground a little wet. I have tried staking them with the short plastic stakes I usually use, but this hasn't worked very well. This is in SC where we have had a good amount of wind and rain this winter, but not an extreme amount. I'm guessing that the trees are just at an in-between point where they are very heavy, but not strong enough to support themselves and that the wet ground and wind are too much for the strength of the trunk at this point. Would you recommend getting some sort of long (10-12 inches?) metal stake to drive in the ground, or would you even go to the extreme of driving some sort of 8 foot post into the ground beside the tree to strap the tree to? I need to get this fixed this weekend for a customer and would appreciate any input.

baddboygeorge
03-07-2009, 11:18 PM
sounds like root ball is buried in mulch an not dirt, replant an make sure mulch is only used as a top dressing , when you put dirt around the ball make sure that dirt is not higher than the taper of the root ball make sure you tamp the dirt very well around the root ball an if needed stake tree for added support,,,, good luck George

weasel
03-07-2009, 11:54 PM
sounds like root ball is buried in mulch an not dirt, replant an make sure mulch is only used as a top dressing , when you put dirt around the ball make sure that dirt is not higher than the taper of the root ball make sure you tamp the dirt very well around the root ball an if needed stake tree for added support,,,, good luck George

Ditto. However,he states he planted them 2 yrs ago so the roots should've taken hold. I would add root stimulator during the re-plant.

I hate doing the same job twice:hammerhead:

baddboygeorge
03-08-2009, 12:29 AM
Thats correct but if rootball is covered in just mulch an no dirt ,root development would be very shallow an unstable to support a 7-8 foot speciman, especially with any wind at all, if the plant would have been properly installed in dirt , tamped an staked , tree would be very solid an root development would be deep an very supportive!

mikegbuff
03-08-2009, 12:36 AM
The mulch was added about a year after the trees were planted in fall 2006. No problems the first two years...just after a rainy and windy winter this year. The trees with problems are the ones that are planted on flat ground. The ones planted on a steep slope are fine. Kinda weird I thought.

baddboygeorge
03-08-2009, 01:00 AM
You hit the nail on the head , flat ground holds water, sloped ground allows run off , so the ones planted in flat soil had an over load of water to the rootball which made the soil unstable to support the plant , the ones on the slope area took on the same amount of water but with them on the slope the water was able to exit the rootball allowing the rootball to stay moist but not water logged,,,,,

Chestnut Oaks Prez
03-08-2009, 01:32 AM
I have 10 leyland cypress trees we planted for a client 2 years ago. There were 3 gallon size, about 4' tall at the time. They are now about 7-8' tall with thick limbs. This winter, the trees started leaning and falling over towards the ground. When I say lean, I mean the trunk is staying straight, pushing the dirt over and leaning the whole tree. The trees are not bending at an angle on the trunk. The trees do not have mulch piled against them, but are in a bed of mulch, so this may be keeping the ground a little wet. I have tried staking them with the short plastic stakes I usually use, but this hasn't worked very well. This is in SC where we have had a good amount of wind and rain this winter, but not an extreme amount. I'm guessing that the trees are just at an in-between point where they are very heavy, but not strong enough to support themselves and that the wet ground and wind are too much for the strength of the trunk at this point. Would you recommend getting some sort of long (10-12 inches?) metal stake to drive in the ground, or would you even go to the extreme of driving some sort of 8 foot post into the ground beside the tree to strap the tree to? I need to get this fixed this weekend for a customer and would appreciate any input.

Must be something bout the upstate. These trees have been planted 7 yrs and never a problem. Wind a couple weeks back leaned one and well look at the mess after the snow.

weasel
03-09-2009, 12:42 AM
Must be something bout the upstate. These trees have been planted 7 yrs and never a problem. Wind a couple weeks back leaned one and well look at the mess after the snow.

were you able to save those?

Chestnut Oaks Prez
03-09-2009, 11:39 PM
were you able to save those?

I hope, those pics were Saturday.