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View Full Version : Outdoor Roof Support On Paver Patio


MDLawn
03-11-2009, 10:21 AM
Any ideas, rather proper construction, on this problem I am going to incur building my own paver patio. Currently there is an extension of the roof (kind of like a solid awning, wood, shingles, etc..) over a current cracked and sinking concrete patio that will be removed. In terms of support for that roof, should the posts rest on the pavers or should a seperate footing be creating to support the roof/awning? The roof covers an approximate 10' x 10' area. The patio will extend much beyond this area. Any suggestions would be appreciated!

mcclureandson
03-11-2009, 10:30 AM
You need a seperate footer at the appropriate depth for your area. Leave it below grade a sufficient depth to allow for your compacted base, bedding sand and pavers...

MDLawn
03-11-2009, 10:40 AM
Thanks. I was figuring this but just wanted some advice. Thanks again.

Danscapes
03-11-2009, 11:47 AM
You need a seperate footer at the appropriate depth for your area. Leave it below grade a sufficient depth to allow for your compacted base, bedding sand and pavers...

Yes'um.:waving:

MDLawn
03-12-2009, 12:48 PM
Guys, another thought just came to me that needs clarification. Would I have the posts rest on the footer and then place base material around and bury those sections of the posts? Or just have the footer below everything and the posts on top of the pavers? Any good clarification about this would be great as I don't need my roof coming off. Again, Thanks.

NewHorizon's Land
03-13-2009, 06:06 AM
The post is buried in the footer, footer is below the frost line. You will put the base material right against the post. Make sure you compact really well around the post.

MDLawn
03-13-2009, 10:17 AM
As always thanks for the info!

Bru75
03-13-2009, 03:55 PM
You could also pour your footer at the frostline and use a sonotube to bring the concrete to the level of the patio then attach your posts with a metal base bolted to the concrete. This resolves future settlement issues and rotting posts.

MDLawn
03-13-2009, 04:57 PM
I thought about the posts rotting too. I think that idea sounds good. Looks like I've got more work than I figured. But isn't it always that way anyways!!!:dizzy:

MDLawn
03-13-2009, 05:18 PM
Could you just use the sonotubes down to the frost line? I only have two 4x4 posts to support.

Bru75
03-13-2009, 07:17 PM
Could you just use the sonotubes down to the frost line? I only have two 4x4 posts to support.

You should dig as far as required by code locally. Here it is two feet.
I have installed both ways, depending on the particulars. For the tubes, I pour the footer holes full of concrete and use the tubes for the top one foot to make everything look nice at ground level.
I'll post a few pictures later, if that would help.

MDLawn
03-13-2009, 08:13 PM
Pictures would be great. Around here I believe the depth needed is nearly 4ft. I was looking at the sonotube website and they have an application that allows you to combine the footer and the tube with a seperate piece. I think it is just called TubeBase. Thanks again.

Bru75
03-14-2009, 11:30 AM
Four feet? Wow, it's cold up there!
Anyway, here are a few pictures. As I said, I dug the holes, placed the tubes,(about a one foot section), and poured the holes full of concrete. The important thing is to calculate the level of the finished pavers, so you come out even at the top.
The owner was going to build the pergola himself, after I installed the footings. I don't know if he ever finished or not.

MDLawn
03-14-2009, 05:26 PM
That is almost exactly what I am going to do. These pictures really helped!! Yea its still cold here right now and has been in the single digits to teens for most of the winter. That explains the 48 inch depth needed. Again thanks to everyone for all the information. I hope to do this project this spring and this has answered A LOT of questions.

xtreem3d
03-14-2009, 06:12 PM
curious why the homeowner didn't have you install some sort of lag bolt in the pour ?

Bru75
03-14-2009, 07:41 PM
curious why the homeowner didn't have you install some sort of lag bolt in the pour ?
I advised against it because it's hard to tell how long before he actually builds it, and it would be a tripping hazzard. I told him to buy some of the steel post bases that fasten to the concrete with a 1/2" lag bolt and a lead anchor. Even offered to come by and hammerdrill the holes for him, but I haven't heard anything from him yet.

riverwalklandscaping
03-14-2009, 09:02 PM
what was the concrete slab for? a hot tub or something? I would think it would be fine resting on the pavers, they are as strong as the slab

Bru75
03-14-2009, 11:29 PM
what was the concrete slab for? a hot tub or something? I would think it would be fine resting on the pavers, they are as strong as the slab

I knew somebody would spot that. Hot tub. Pavers would support it fine, but would not be level.

riverwalklandscaping
03-17-2009, 11:30 PM
Oh right the slope for drainage. Did you do a pretty agressive slope? I think I could deal with having my hotub have one side an inch higher than the other.

Bru75
03-17-2009, 11:53 PM
Oh right the slope for drainage. Did you do a pretty agressive slope? I think I could deal with having my hotub have one side an inch higher than the other.

The pavers slope about 3/4" from one end of the hot tub slab to the other. The owner was adamant about the slab being perfectly level, I think it was his biggest concern for the whole job.

NewHorizon's Land
03-18-2009, 10:22 AM
Couldn't you have made that area level fore the pavers and then crown the rest of the pavers so it slopes away. It would have required alot of work but IMO it would look better then concrete in the middle of a paver patio.

Bru75
03-18-2009, 10:58 AM
Could have, but would have been more trouble to grade the base. Right now it is a single slope from the house to the grass.
The slab is the exact size of the hot tub, so it is not visible.

riverwalklandscaping
03-18-2009, 12:09 PM
Works fine I'm sure... I hope they never decide to move it lol. Did you run electrical in the patio at all or something?

Bru75
03-18-2009, 04:41 PM
Yeah, if they move it it's gonna look kind of funny, but they wanted a slab, so a slab is what they got. Worked out for me though, I needed concrete for the footers anyway and the minimum load is one yard. The footers and slab used one and 1/4 yard and I didn't have to mix bagged concrete like I would have for the footers only.
The tub and power were already there before I started, they have the line running in from the side to a post just off the far end of the patio.