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ktfinch2000
03-15-2009, 08:50 AM
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I have a customer wanting their back yard reseeded. I have done this before for myself but this is my first time doing it for a customer. They have 2000sq ft that needs tilling and I'm going to spread 14 yards of loam on top for a 2" base, lime,fertilize, and reseed. Just wondering what some of you might charge for a job like this. I will be doing it myself with a helper. I can get the loam delivered within 15 feet of where it needs to be spread and I will be spreading with wheel barrel. Yard is very flat with easy access. Any thoughts on a rough price would be very helpful. I figured around 1400 completed with materials included 2 days at the most to complete. Is that to high or to low? Thanks in advance.
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foreplease
03-15-2009, 10:30 AM
Looks like about $420 in materials cost to me, leaving $980 for labor and any equipment charges. Undoubtedly it is a lot of work but I think at that price you are going to get the "What if we sod?' question.

There is going to be a lot of aftercare in this thing to bring it in right. If you are including that and present is as such (a guaranteed finished yard) you can probably sell it and will have earned it.

I would add some type of mulch over the newly seeded area. What kind of soil is there now? You know for sure that lime is needed? You have to be careful using lime and some fertilizers within a couple weeks of each other.

ktfinch2000
03-15-2009, 05:16 PM
I've always put lime down with starter when I do new seeding. The soil is in good shape but he had a tree felled last year so I have to have a stump ground down and then spread the loam out and till the whole yard. I figured since he had a massive oak tree there for many years the soil is probably pretty acidic. I was told by a gentlmen at lesc that the lime would help the fertilizer take better. Any thoughts?

hackitdown
03-15-2009, 06:17 PM
I think you are on target with your price. I have a couple of suggestions, and questions. Why till the yard if you are putting down new loam? Seems like wasted effort. Have you considered renting a bobcat or a kubota with a york rake to move the loam? A machine could turn it into a 1 day job.

Regarding lime, you would need to test the new loam to check the pH level to know whether or not to lime. I'd seed and apply starter fert, roll it, and starter fert again in two weeks. It'll grow if they water it.

You can mulch it with straw to keep it damp while it germinates, but that can make a mess, and may contain weed seed.

foreplease
03-15-2009, 07:18 PM
I'm sure the guy at Lesco will steer you right. You are probably right regarding the oak. You just don't want the source of nitrogen to be ammonical if you are using lime within two weeks either way. Nutrients are available to plants in varying amounts as pH changes - that is probably what he meant.

JNyz
03-15-2009, 07:18 PM
Sod picked up would only be 320.00. If you did a light tilling and grading you would have everything completed in one day and over 1000.00 left over. Oh, and a very nice lawn.

ktfinch2000
03-15-2009, 10:07 PM
I did not mention this in the begininng but the reason I have to do this job is there was a huge oak tree that was taken down last fall. They dropped the tree limbs without tying them off so they made big craters everywere. I have to remove a stump 45" across. I found someone to grind the stump for $250 and he also will hydroseed the 2000sq ft for $300. So basically I would only have to spread the loam and I have a guarantee from the hydroseed guy that the lawn will take. So I figure I'll charge the customer $1850 labor and materials for everything and should be able to walk away with 1 days work for myself and a helper with a $1000. This option will save me a days labor of seeding, fertilizing, and the headache if the grass does not take if I seeded the old fashion way. Do you guys think this is a better option? Thanks guys for all your help by the way. I love this site!

foreplease
03-15-2009, 10:21 PM
Pffft! First, good luck selling that. Second, that's not how I would do it. What is the benefit to the customer?

If you can sell them at $1,850, have the decency to take $20 out of your other pocket, find out where JNyz gets his sod, and leave them grass at the end of the day.

Sorry but it looks like you haven't done much of this and if this job goes your way we will still be able to say that when it's over.

JNyz
03-15-2009, 10:33 PM
Pffft! First, good luck selling that. Second, that's not how I would do it. What is the benefit to the customer?

If you can sell them at $1,850, have the decency to take $20 out of your other pocket, find out where JNyz gets his sod, and leave them grass at the end of the day.

Sorry but it looks like you haven't done much of this and if this job goes your way we will still be able to say that when it's over.

My sod comes from Johnson Sod in Millvile NJ for about 90.00/pallet. That woud be a little to far for him to travel.

foreplease
03-15-2009, 10:42 PM
He'll have a whole day freed up ha ha...

ktfinch2000
03-15-2009, 10:46 PM
The only reason I thought this would be good is I don't have much experience doing this type of work for customers and I've never layed sod down. I'm worried about having bad results doing the seeding for a customer and not for myself. I've had great results doing it for myself but I'm a bit nervous doing it for a customer. I do mostly lawn maintainence multching and things of that nature. I did not say that was how I was going to do it. I asked these questions here to get opinions from experience people. That was just an option that was brought to me by the gentlemen doing the stump grinding. I guess asking opinons leaves you open for rude comments about the work your trying to get advice on. Foreplease thanks for the support!

foreplease
03-15-2009, 11:15 PM
I can be very supportive but this thing took a twist sometime today. The way you explained in your last post is great. I think if you can get the confidence of the customer and convince them you want the job and the experience and will hang with it until it's right, they will get their lawn back and you will get a check and some experience. That sounds like a win-win to me. I hope that's how it goes.

I'm not a big sod advocate by the way. I may have been confusing in that.

ktfinch2000
03-16-2009, 12:01 AM
Well thanks to all. I really do appreciate the help Thanks Again Guys!

hackitdown
03-16-2009, 08:30 AM
You will have excellent results with hydroseeding. Laying sod is less common in New England, hydroseeding is more common. It takes care of the seed, fert, and mulch.

gardiner
03-16-2009, 10:04 AM
I've always put lime down with starter when I do new seeding. The soil is in good shape but he had a tree felled last year so I have to have a stump ground down and then spread the loam out and till the whole yard. I figured since he had a massive oak tree there for many years the soil is probably pretty acidic. I was told by a gentlmen at lesc that the lime would help the fertilizer take better. Any thoughts?

roto-till and massive oak tree . gives me a head ache thinking about it together. ( pulling all them roots out of the tines every coulpe feet ) myself i would try and just clean out the area the tree was the best i can. and bring in good top soil to fill and spot fill all divits. maybe cut the area as low as possible . thatch over seed /fert ( but i have not see the job ) and i do know how much a pita it can be raking up tree roots and busted up sod by hand .
all i can say is think what you are getting into tearing up a back lawn not having a bob cat with tooth bucket and rock hound.