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View Full Version : Now THIS is a real chainsaw


4.3mudder
03-24-2009, 01:23 AM
My grandfather had this at his place to fix, I think it is badazz.

Assuming it is an old poulan :confused:, judging by the color green.

I have never seen one of these before, I have heard of them, but never seen one. I know some of you have seen them and have used them before, what is the specific purpose of using one like this?

ExtExc
03-24-2009, 01:34 AM
What the hell is that thing. Haha. I don't know the advantage. Maybe its better for large diameter trees?

unkownfl
03-24-2009, 01:43 AM
makes it alot easier to collect workman's comp?

4.3mudder
03-24-2009, 01:57 AM
makes it alot easier to collect workman's comp?

:laugh::laugh: or a get to go home early.

Yes, it is a chiansaw, but the advantage I have not clue.

To me that thing is a rag, really because it is not orange and white, also because it is older than me.

grincon
03-24-2009, 02:35 AM
its a push bar, to push into smaller diameter trees and shrubs. I think, Ive only heard of them, never actually seen one

Runner
03-24-2009, 05:17 AM
That is what is called a bow saw. There are very few pieces of equipment in the industry that are more dangerous than that.

Tony Clifton
03-24-2009, 09:27 AM
Yep, thats one of the most dangerous tools you could use.

Danscapes
03-24-2009, 09:30 AM
Yes it is a bow saw. And yes it is very dangerous but very effective as well, it's used for cutting brush and under growth. In the right hands it is better to use that to cut down honeysuckle and stuff than a regular chain saw.

kaferhaus
03-24-2009, 09:32 AM
yep, OSHA regs killed those saws off.... that and the huge number of lawsuits. I had one 20 some years ago, scared the hell out of me and everyone else that ever used it.

I sold it to a guy on my route that saw it and just had to have it. Even with the warning I gave him he wanted it.

DA Quality Lawn & YS
03-24-2009, 09:42 AM
A saw like that....and no hand guard?!?

ALC-GregH
03-24-2009, 09:54 AM
That would make a great boat anchor. Just be sure to drain the gas and oil. :)

LarryF
03-24-2009, 09:56 AM
Yes it is a bow saw. And yes it is very dangerous but very effective as well, it's used for cutting brush and under growth. In the right hands it is better to use that to cut down honeysuckle and stuff than a regular chain saw.

Well, others refer to it as a "bow chain saw", and used ones are still available, on ebay, for instance, and they seem to be going for a pretty low price.

http://shop.ebay.com/items/bow%20chain%20saw?_dmd=2&_sop=1&keyword=bow+chain+saw&crlp=1912424543_9415&tt_encode=raw&MT_ID=475

If anyone is really interested, a new bow frame like that can be bought that will fit on the saw heads of other manufactrueres such as Stihl, Husqvarna, Poulan, Echo, etc., and that's also shown on the same website.

4.3mudder
03-24-2009, 10:26 AM
This thing is heavy too, no plastic besides the air cleaner cover. What a beast, I want to use it when he gets done with it.

Johnagain
03-25-2009, 02:08 AM
I have one of those saws but it's a Homelite. They are the best thing in the world for cutting up logs on the ground. The bar is so narrow that it is almost impossible to bind the chain or bar when the log starts to pinch. When you get the cut through the log then just pull the saw back out. The stand on the bar keeps the saw stable beside the log and all you have to do is hang on. What is also good is that their is almost no kickback. That is what they are designed to cut. I think mine weighs at least 25lbs.

Lucky Star Lawn Care
03-25-2009, 02:56 AM
Thats pretty crazy lookn

Happy Frog
03-25-2009, 03:38 AM
That is an evil tool.
Sell it and forget about it...

Doogiegh
03-28-2009, 05:35 PM
There's lots of guys that use those today.. They are called Amputees!!

Cuttinitclose
03-28-2009, 05:53 PM
Looks like a chainsaw from hell!

lifetree
03-28-2009, 06:32 PM
There's lots of guys that use those today ... They are called Amputees !!

Don't you mean they used them "yesterday" ?? :laugh: :laugh:

dwost
03-28-2009, 06:40 PM
That is in fact a Poulan and from the early 70's. I have one as well that was my dad's but not with a bow but a 20" bar. I'd keep it, get a standard bar, tune it up and let it rip. This thing is a beast and has tons of power. As a matter of fact, I still have the pamphlet for it and I believe it shows that model. I'll try and find it and scan. funny how times have changed.

jkilov
03-28-2009, 07:07 PM
That's a pulp bow. There were also smaller bows called plungers.

It was designed to do a very specific task, that was to buck medium sized timber that had already been limbed. The operator would push the bow near straight down into the trunk. The curved shape allowed it to cut that piece effectively without touching the ground and dulling the chain. What's more the void allowed the cut to close without pinching the bar, which is a major cause of kickbacks when bucking. The top edge should NEVER be allowed to enter the cut. If so, you're cutting too big a wood for that bar.

In many ways that bar was a safer tool for that specific task at the possibilities of the time (saws didn't have brakes back then). The problem was/is that people never accepted the bow for what it is - a highly specialized tool. It can't and should'nt be used for anything else, specially brush cutting :dizzy:, though some seem to believe so.

Once people started using it for tasks not meant to or on really big wood, the accidents started mounting and the bow was gone. My father used the bow for decades without incident, because he used it the right way.

Junior M
03-28-2009, 07:09 PM
That's a pulp bow. There were also smaller bows called plungers.

It was designed to do a very specific task, that was to buck medium sized timber that had already been limbed. The operator would push the bow near straight down into the trunk. The curved shape allowed it to cut that piece effectively without touching the ground and dulling the chain. What's more the void allowed the cut to close without pinching the bar, which is a major cause of kickbacks when bucking. The top edge should NEVER be allowed to enter the cut. If so, you're cutting too big a wood for that bar.

In many ways that bar was a safer tool for that specific task at the possibilities of the time (saws didn't have brakes back then). The problem was/is that people never accepted the bow for what it is - a highly specialized tool. It can't and should'nt be used for anything else, specially brush cutting :dizzy:, though some seem to believe so.

Once people started using it for tasks not meant to or on really big wood, the accidents started mounting and the bow was gone. My father used the bow for decades without incident, because he used it the right way.
Thats the only way I've seen it used, I know guys that this is all they use for bucking timber...

jkilov
03-28-2009, 08:30 PM
It can't and should'nt be used for anything else, specially brush cutting :dizzy:, though some seem to believe so.

One more thing before I offend anyone. Brush bars are very similar to bows, though somewhat flatter and with long guards attached both bottom and top. These WERE used for brush cutting.

Speaking of guards, most folks removed them off bows which added to the risk. And your picture is proof. Both upper and lower guards are missing. All that's left is the bottom stinger, with the top missing as well.

4.3mudder
03-28-2009, 08:51 PM
The guy is going to keep it, he wants it fixed up and wants it to run. So, it is made to cut wood in half on the ground? I guess that how I figure it. Correct me if I'm wrong.

Runner
03-29-2009, 05:29 PM
Not exactly ON the gound. ANY chain that touches dirt is going to dull right out immediately. It is for once trunks are felled, taking the limbs off (bucking). These limbs in many cases are pressed against the ground, causing saw bars to get pinched. This cuts through without the pinching.

STIHL GUY
03-29-2009, 10:43 PM
looks nice and heavy

4.3mudder
03-29-2009, 11:02 PM
Not exactly ON the gound. ANY chain that touches dirt is going to dull right out immediately. It is for once trunks are felled, taking the limbs off (bucking). These limbs in many cases are pressed against the ground, causing saw bars to get pinched. This cuts through without the pinching.

I see. I can't wait to try it out, it is very heavy too, nothing plastic on it.

sunray
03-29-2009, 11:29 PM
In Georgia and I'm sure in most of the south that was known as a pulpwood saw and I'm sure in it's day real men could produce a good days work with those monsters.
Back in the hay-day of these saws, tools did not have all the safety stuff on them.
You were expected to do your job and pay attention to what you were doing, or the next man would.

4.3mudder
03-29-2009, 11:40 PM
In Georgia and I'm sure in most of the south that was known as a pulpwood saw and I'm sure in it's day real men could produce a good days work with those monsters.
Back in the hay-day of these saws, tools did not have all the safety stuff on them.
You were expected to do your job and pay attention to what you were doing, or the next man would.

That's when OSHA and the EPA came along. We would have ZTR's without all the safety crap.

puppypaws
03-30-2009, 02:27 AM
That's a pulp bow. There were also smaller bows called plungers.

It was designed to do a very specific task, that was to buck medium sized timber that had already been limbed. The operator would push the bow near straight down into the trunk. The curved shape allowed it to cut that piece effectively without touching the ground and dulling the chain. What's more the void allowed the cut to close without pinching the bar, which is a major cause of kickbacks when bucking. The top edge should NEVER be allowed to enter the cut. If so, you're cutting too big a wood for that bar.

In many ways that bar was a safer tool for that specific task at the possibilities of the time (saws didn't have brakes back then). The problem was/is that people never accepted the bow for what it is - a highly specialized tool. It can't and should'nt be used for anything else, specially brush cutting :dizzy:, though some seem to believe so.

Once people started using it for tasks not meant to or on really big wood, the accidents started mounting and the bow was gone. My father used the bow for decades without incident, because he used it the right way.

This boy from Mississippi has the correct answers. Using that saw is like dieing and going to heaven compared to pulling a cross cut.