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View Full Version : A couple demos!!


TXNSLighting
03-24-2009, 10:42 PM
Heres the first: from a couple weeks ago.

TXNSLighting
03-24-2009, 10:45 PM
Nevermind, the pics didnt get put on my comp!!

greenbaylawns
03-24-2009, 10:52 PM
looks good. I like the path way

Mr. Quik electric
03-24-2009, 11:14 PM
Hey Ryan,

Are they buyers?

TXNSLighting
03-25-2009, 12:41 AM
Not yet...They said they got hit with a financal issue the day after the demo and need to wait a couple months. But think they're going to buy then. So who knows. O well, moving on to the next clients.

David Gretzmier
03-25-2009, 09:40 AM
I did a couple of demo's a few weeks ago, and they said the same thing- let's wait a couple of months. I need work NOW. But, I'll take it in a few months too.

JoeyD
03-25-2009, 10:58 AM
Looks awesome buddy!!!! Keep up the good work!!

Mark B
03-25-2009, 11:49 AM
I'm glad I'm not the only person that has heard that.

TXNSLighting
03-25-2009, 08:29 PM
Looks awesome buddy!!!! Keep up the good work!!

The unique demo kit in action Joey!

JoeyD
03-26-2009, 11:51 AM
They do work!!!! Keep it up....sucks they backed out on you!

TXNSLighting
03-26-2009, 01:11 PM
yeh its alright. I at least got to do something with lighting. that was the first demo in months, so it was good to do some designing!!

KrayzKajun
03-26-2009, 01:16 PM
lookin good bud!

Mr. Quik electric
03-27-2009, 09:08 AM
I probably only close 25% of the people I demo. I am trying to rethink my pre screening processes a bit. I have started sending out a pre meeting package to my set appointments. This will include a DVD slideshow of past work, A Q&A sheet of common questions, General info about our company, What makes us different than the rest, the kind of fixtures we use and how we don't compete with the landscape and home depot markets, General pricing of lighting packages and what they get for the money. Service agreements and how they work/what we do. Requirements for meeting with me onsite and what they can expect at the meeting.

Things like this, I am hoping to narrow down the time on site by answering a lot of their questions prior to meeting. I am also giving them prices of systems so if they are expecting home cheapo to come to their house they can respectfully call me up and cancel our appointment and not waste each others time. With DVD, I am trying to eliminate the need for the demo altogether by showing them beautiful past work so that they will realize they can trust me to give them the very best display for their home without me having to hold their hand through the demo. I would primarily like to only utilize the demo mainly for upselling purposes. My pictures of houses that look like theirs should be enough to give them the sense of what is to be accomplished. I really am trying to limit my onsite visit to one stop only. They buy the first time I am there. I am hoping the info packet will reinforce what I am trying to accomplish.

TXNSLighting
03-27-2009, 08:31 PM
I think thats some great ideas Tim. I have definitely been trying to think of ways to eliminate the demos. I like the idea of making a dvd and all that. I really need to get more installs done so i have an extensive portfolio. Ive only done about 15 or 20 so far. Ive been looking into making a folder to leave with the customer. Have a nice picture on the front. and then have all the papers and stuff inside, like q&a and all that. all good stuff Tim.

ford550
03-27-2009, 08:47 PM
Nice stuff Tim. I agree, screening is very difficult. You don't want to waste your time, but a the same time some people you never thought would spend $7K on lighting, do and the ones that should, don't. It's definitely a catch 22. I like your approach, prepares them for what great lighting is vs. the cheopo crap.

Sorry Ryan, didn't mean to hijack..............nice demo.

TXNSLighting
03-27-2009, 09:32 PM
No prob bud! as long as we keep on the topic of lighting!

MAGLIGHTING
03-27-2009, 09:33 PM
Nice stuff Tim. I agree, screening is very difficult. You don't want to waste your time, but a the same time some people you never thought would spend $7K on lighting, do and the ones that should, don't. It's definitely a catch 22. I like your approach, prepares them for what great lighting is vs. the cheopo crap.

Sorry Ryan, didn't mean to hijack..............nice demo.

$75-$100 design consultation fees do wonders to seperate the wheat from the chafe.

4.3mudder
03-27-2009, 10:49 PM
Nice. I was over there by North Park mall at night, and noticed places with lights in the trees. Why do they do this? Security?

MAGLIGHTING
03-27-2009, 11:20 PM
They are called Be backs in the car business. Non buyers who don't have the stomach to tell you that they won't be buying now but will dangle the carrot and tell you that they "might" be buying sometime down the road.

Regarding the financial crisis a few days after your demo That's just a poor excuse. Do you really believe that or does it just make you feel better to believe it. I have some ocean front property in Arizona I 'd like to sell you.

If a demo isn't blowing them away and you are not closing that night then your chances are very small that it will happen later. See Tim's 25% closing with a demo and I'm guessing most or all of thoose closes happen at the demo. If they are not all hot and bothered and chomping at the bit while your demo is in action then once you've left they will certainly go cold.

A prospect cannot be completely educated and persuaded during an initial 2 hour meeting.

A prospect has to come to you predisposed to buy an outdoor lighting system . Your marketing must get them into a buying mode or you won't make the sale.

A demo should be reserved for very picky clients (someone who has commited to buy from you already) who will otherwise make you crazy because you can't get a bead on what it is that they like and want.

Mock ups are done all the time in other trades. But the job is already in the can and your going from a selling mode to a designing mode not vice versa.

Pro-Scapes
03-27-2009, 11:35 PM
I have often said I do this by leaving the install in place unburied until viewed at night when a client is on the fence about a design or wants to be super involved with it.

This is after a deposit has been issued and a commitment to the project has gone forward.

David Gretzmier
03-27-2009, 11:36 PM
On the Demo- it's disappointing, last spring I remember going through all my referrals on Landscape lighting, did demo's on folks who were predisposed to my work, had hired me or seen my literature and wanted a bid, and then the demo pushed them over the edge and we had work. this year, same scenerio, but no closes. same basic demographic, but I really think the heavy wage earners are looking at that stock statement/401k statement and reeling.

I think my demo's get better every year, and my pricing is pretty much the same as last year, but the mood is put it off ( or that is thier way of saying no) . I had one demo I did a month and a half back that said she had been asking for landscape lighting for 2 years. she's been a regular Christmas light customer for 7. she gushed over the demo, and wanted to buy, but her husband said not to spend money. He is a supplier to the commercial construction industry, and he has put in materials in several large commercial projects and not gotten paid on foreclosed properties.

I'm still advertising and following up on leads, but I just don't have the work I have had in the past two years from demo's.

sunray
03-28-2009, 12:17 AM
I need to talk it over with my husband/wife, is a polite way to say, no thankyou.
They are always looking for the cheaper price.
Good luck anyway

MAGLIGHTING
03-28-2009, 08:09 AM
I need to talk it over with my husband/wife, is a polite way to say, no thankyou.
They are always looking for the cheaper price.
Good luck anyway

When you hear that objection you pretty much know it's over.

Mr. Quik electric
03-28-2009, 09:23 AM
When you hear that objection you pretty much know it's over.

Oh man, aint that the truth. When I hear things like that I can't find the front door fast enough.


Hey Keith,

You mentioned closings being down from past years, there is no doubt that a complete sector of our market has been hit hard. I have personally talked to many very well off executives in my area around here who have lost a significant portion of their savings and are limiting spending on non essential items. I have had to take a step back and look at how I am now marketing and appealing to some of these prospects.

In the past our marketing was specifically seeking out clients who wanted to beautify their home at night, and while that is still my main goal, I am now seasoning alot of it with a primary emphasis on security. With people losing jobs and crime on the rise, affluent clients may see a rise in break ins and violent crimes in their neighborhoods by those seeking to make a quick buck by resorting to desperate measures. Often times the husband is out of town on business and the wife and kids are left at home alone. I like to build the scenario "not so much as an alarmist, but a realist", that a dark home with plenty of hiding places under windows is a prime target for home invasions. I will also emphasise to the wife and make it addament to the husband that not all home invasions are about stealing big screens and jewelry. Often times these perps will be casing the house and will know when the husband is gone, so they can gain access for reasons you can, but don't want to imagine (rape, kidnapping for ransom as we have been seeing alot of, child rape and molestation. All usually ending in murder). It is a small price to pay to discourage these would be intruders. As I always tell them, most intruders are cowards and will seek out an easy target first, "like your neighbors poorly lit house with lots of dark corners". Having your house properly lit will not only deter this type of activity but will also increase the beauty of your home at the same time. A wise investment in safety for your family.

See, in these changing financial times we don't have to change the way we light homes so much as the way we need to change our pshychological approach to our customers. If we can make that wife feel safer while she is at home alone with the kids at night and beautify their property in the process. Well, if just doesn't seem like a real hard sell when you consider the safety of your family.

Getting back to the one stop. Mike, I know you are a big advocate of this. Do you think I am on the right track with what I am trying to do as far as front loading all the info 2-3 days prior to my meeting with them. My aim is to give them the tools to make an informed and conscience decision right when I am there. They will know my pricing structure, they will see my work, most of their questions will already be answered and they will have 2-3 nights to "sleep on it" prior to my arrival and meeting with them. All I will need to do is Q&A on site, on site design (small CAD representation of fixture layout on their property from my laptop and printer in my truck), Walk through the site and explain the design with them, Quote for phased installation and ask for the sale (signed contract). How does this sound? Am I on the right track or do you think I am pushing and rushing the sale too much?

MAGLIGHTING
03-29-2009, 10:17 AM
Oh man, aint that the truth. When I hear things like that I can't find the front door fast enough.


Hey Keith,

You mentioned closings being down from past years, there is no doubt that a complete sector of our market has been hit hard. I have personally talked to many very well off executives in my area around here who have lost a significant portion of their savings and are limiting spending on non essential items. I have had to take a step back and look at how I am now marketing and appealing to some of these prospects.

In the past our marketing was specifically seeking out clients who wanted to beautify their home at night, and while that is still my main goal, I am now seasoning alot of it with a primary emphasis on security. With people losing jobs and crime on the rise, affluent clients may see a rise in break ins and violent crimes in their neighborhoods by those seeking to make a quick buck by resorting to desperate measures. Often times the husband is out of town on business and the wife and kids are left at home alone. I like to build the scenario "not so much as an alarmist, but a realist", that a dark home with plenty of hiding places under windows is a prime target for home invasions. I will also emphasise to the wife and make it addament to the husband that not all home invasions are about stealing big screens and jewelry. Often times these perps will be casing the house and will know when the husband is gone, so they can gain access for reasons you can, but don't want to imagine (rape, kidnapping for ransom as we have been seeing alot of, child rape and molestation. All usually ending in murder). It is a small price to pay to discourage these would be intruders. As I always tell them, most intruders are cowards and will seek out an easy target first, "like your neighbors poorly lit house with lots of dark corners". Having your house properly lit will not only deter this type of activity but will also increase the beauty of your home at the same time. A wise investment in safety for your family.

See, in these changing financial times we don't have to change the way we light homes so much as the way we need to change our pshychological approach to our customers. If we can make that wife feel safer while she is at home alone with the kids at night and beautify their property in the process. Well, if just doesn't seem like a real hard sell when you consider the safety of your family.

Getting back to the one stop. Mike, I know you are a big advocate of this. Do you think I am on the right track with what I am trying to do as far as front loading all the info 2-3 days prior to my meeting with them. My aim is to give them the tools to make an informed and conscience decision right when I am there. They will know my pricing structure, they will see my work, most of their questions will already be answered and they will have 2-3 nights to "sleep on it" prior to my arrival and meeting with them. All I will need to do is Q&A on site, on site design (small CAD representation of fixture layout on their property from my laptop and printer in my truck), Walk through the site and explain the design with them, Quote for phased installation and ask for the sale (signed contract). How does this sound? Am I on the right track or do you think I am pushing and rushing the sale too much?

Tim I think you are on track as that is a great plan you are considering. In spite of all best efforts though people buy on their own time schedule not ours. :cry: Don't let it disappoint you if/when you don't always get that 1 call close. If the project is important to you then keep following up .

Highly motivated decision makers will buy on the first and only site visit no matter the project size if they have all of the information needed to make that decision. Those clients for me always turn out to be my best clients because that is how I make decisions right wrong or indifferent.

Then you have the over analytical types-engineers, money managers, accountants need I say more. They will micro analyze every aspect of your quote. They have to "talk it over with their spouse", and then with their neighbor to see how much the decaying aluminum system they had put in cost. "Run it up the flagpole with anyone else who hasn't got a clue", "check with their lawyer" and then after all that Put it in a spread sheet, might get several more bids, head out to the local distributor or go online to check on materials cost, agonize over simple design decison making and then perhaps decide to go a different way and roll up their sleeves and slam it in the ground with a couple of beer buddies on a lost weekend or 2. If you do get the project they can turn out to be a royal pain in the a$$, because their expectations are unrealistic and they want a $10,000 result from a $6,500 investment. Luckily this type is a rare breed but you unfortunately do sometimes cross paths with them.

Mr. Quik electric
03-29-2009, 08:19 PM
Then you have the over analytical types-engineers, money managers, accountants need I say more. They will micro analyze every aspect of your quote. They have to "talk it over with their spouse", and then with their neighbor to see how much the decaying aluminum system they had put in cost. "Run it up the flagpole with anyone else who hasn't got a clue", "check with their lawyer" and then after all that Put it in a spread sheet, might get several more bids, head out to the local distributor or go online to check on materials cost, agonize over simple design decison making and then perhaps decide to go a different way and roll up their sleeves and slam it in the ground with a couple of beer buddies on a lost weekend or 2. If you do get the project they can turn out to be a royal pain in the a$$, because their expectations are unrealistic and they want a $10,000 result from a $6,500 investment. Luckily this type is a rare breed but you unfortunately do sometimes cross paths with them.



Oh man, You got me laughing tonight. I seem to run into a lot of that type. They are a royal pain. Often not worth the time and effort spent.

You know I am not opposed to a second visit if I know they are really interested and just have to ask more questions. I am just really trying to reduce the number of on site call backs by 25-40% over the current hand holding percentage I am doing now. Even if it is only 1 per week that I don't have to go back to, that is a free night to meet with another potential client for the first time. I know you get it. I will give it a tumble and see how it goes.