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monstermog1964
03-25-2009, 10:38 AM
Hello everyone. Just wanted to introduce myself to all of you. I started out 5 years in the Landscape business building brick and rock walls. I then was given the opportunity to learn how to use machines to do alot of different things. As the jobs went by I decided to start my own business. I started out doing all the work myself which was quite rewarding. I've been able to tackle alot of challenges including picking up irrigation and my favorite thing to do is play with water. So here's some pics....Enjoy

Well call this the Lang Job. We started with the back. Dropped trees, added grand stair case, fire pit, play area with play chips, added an additional 3 areas one with a new rock wall, irrigation, water hydrants for watering, expanded additional parking and hydroseeded. We then did the front yard. Working within a budget can be challenging at times but keeping the big picture in view always gets the best results.

The back yard took about 1 month worth of work and $26K, The front took about 1 1/2weeks and $5K. All together we have about $32K invested in the yard. The clients have yet to add the promised soft scape plants but the results were definitely stunning. Just so you know...your viewing a 1 acre site. 29,000 sq/ft of hydroseed and 2K of sod.

monstermog1964
03-25-2009, 11:03 AM
http://www2.snapfish.com/thumbnailshare/AlbumID=234088887/a=78104656_78104656/otsc=SHR/otsi=SALBlink/COBRAND_NAME=snapfish

This job was a very interesting job. In order to see the photos of the before and after you will need to click on the link above. If your familiar with Snapfish sometimes you need to sign in with an account to see the pictures since I have saved the pictures on a 3rd party server to save space on my computer.

We started off with some ideas from the past owner that were very ambitious but the new owners wanted simplicity and good flow which the old yard did not have. So we started with the back on a 1 acre plot. We removed a huge stump, the old dry river bed, and added more definition and flow through raised beds, a 30' pondless water feature, new trees and plants and shrubs, and about 16K feet of new grass. 160 yards of dirt was added and we also cleaned out the perimeter, added some natural pathways through the forest and laid down cedar wood chips for a clean but natural look. We added 6 zones of irrigation to their existing system and then proceeded to the front with new plants, some more beds and grass. We added some 2-3 man rocks through out the landscape to add alot of rich texture. Time on job combined was 1 1/2 month. Cost... $34K with labor. Water feature was roughly $6K as the materials for the rocks/Featherstone soared into the stratosphere but it's what the customer wanted... Hydroseeding was .10 a square foot x 16K sq/ft of grass. Plants $2500 worth of additional plants added.:usflag:

Kennedy Landscaping
03-25-2009, 11:25 AM
Looks good!

JoeyD
03-25-2009, 11:40 AM
Great Job!! Now it just needs some lighting!!

burge19
03-25-2009, 01:41 PM
That is so nice. I wish someone in our area would want to drop that kind of money on there yard!!!

monstermog1964
03-25-2009, 02:45 PM
Well this next project I want to share with you all was probably one of the most challenging projects I worked on. The client lived on a golf course and wanted their yard to represent an "Relaxing Environment" but still maintaining the functionality for entertaining guests and family. They started out with a complete backyard/grass with a rock wall that was built prior to level out the back yard. We set a budget at $56K. I first stripped the yard with a TL-130 Takeuchi. I then dug out the latter part of the yard for a two tier effect that would give the yard a larger feel. I then wrapped the wall intoward the house and poured a cement rat slab staircase that would have slab over the top. I then ran all the wiring for the lights that was ordered through a local vendor. We added a water feature/3-colum bubbler with a tiered look/pondless. Then added all rock wall around the play area to keep the pea gravel in it's area. I then finished with the hardscape and Iron Mountain flagstone to the front of the house and had the sub contractor also put iron mountain flag running along the lower 4" of the wall to add to the effect. We then added a Iron Arbor with a gate and updated the front with a new raised bed and new Focal points for trees and shrubs and more lights. I need to thank the many who helped out in this project. It took about 2 months worth of work and a hole lot of Love!:usflag:


http://www2.snapfish.com/thumbnailshare/AlbumID=173883344/a=78104656_78104656/otsc=SHR/otsi=SALBlink/COBRAND_NAME=snapfish

monstermog1964
03-25-2009, 02:58 PM
Added some additional to the previous job "Herring" but I was unaware of the 10min. rule!

monstermog1964
03-25-2009, 03:16 PM
This next job was a process as it was started in the late fall and was restarted in the early spring due to weather. The customer had a 17' vertical difference from his house to the shop. The client wanted to have rock walls put around his yard. We added 1400 linear feet of rock wall 4' tall/ with an additional 1' toe. Drainage was included with 4" socked pipe and 2' clean ballast tied together to cement catch basins in the yard. We had a Hitachi 220 size excavator, Takeuchi 16k pound excavator, TL 130, a Big 8K pound road vibrator, on site dumptruck. Much thanks to Iron Mountain Quarry for supplying all the rock which was bought direct from the quarry and the transport/hauling was provided by TopGrade Topsoil, Riverside Sand and Gravel. I can say we saved probably 100K from having the quarry only 10 min. away. 5 acres is alot of space but if done right can really look nice.
After all the walls were put in. We raised the road level 12" in some places. Cost $150K +/- with labor. The biggest challenge of this job was curtailing any rainfall as even the smallest amount of rain in sand caused alot of issues. To solve this we dug an 5' deep trench all the way around the sandy hill area which allowed us to work unimpeded.

http://www2.snapfish.com/thumbnailshare/AlbumID=154624784/a=78104656_78104656/otsc=SHR/otsi=SALBlink/COBRAND_NAME=snapfish

monstermog1964
03-25-2009, 03:19 PM
Here are some other pictures of some other jobs that really turned out well.

monstermog1964
03-25-2009, 03:43 PM
First off the first post had some pictures of the after but not of the before. "Lang job"

http://www2.snapfish.com/thumbnailshare/AlbumID=154624782/a=78104656_78104656/otsc=SHR/otsi=SALBlink/COBRAND_NAME=snapfish

Gamon Job: 1 acre lot $46K total front and back 27,000 sq/ft of grass

http://www2.snapfish.com/thumbnailshare/AlbumID=166546657/a=78104656_78104656/otsc=SHR/otsi=SALBlink/COBRAND_NAME=snapfish

Barb's Home: 1 acre lot, 17K sq/ft of grass/sod/ $145K(premium plant bought) Subcontractor working for Premier Landscaping

http://www2.snapfish.com/thumbnailshare/AlbumID=138755142/a=78104656_78104656/otsc=SHR/otsi=SALBlink/COBRAND_NAME=snapfish

Gozo's Home: $16K 1/3 acre...Sod/hydroseed

http://www2.snapfish.com/thumbnailshare/AlbumID=138754581/a=78104656_78104656/otsc=SHR/otsi=SALBlink/COBRAND_NAME=snapfish

monstermog1964
03-25-2009, 03:44 PM
Great Job!! Now it just needs some lighting!!

That is superb. Love the light bouncing off the water! Very nice!

JoeyD
03-25-2009, 03:56 PM
Thanks! Let me kn ow if you need any help with lighting!! I can dial you in or have our rep come out and hook you up with some hands on / on site training!!

monstermog1964
03-25-2009, 05:10 PM
Unique has very nice lighting as I have used them in the past or at least had an option to go with them. Great quality and good customer service. I will let you know if I need any help.

Ces

pitrack
03-26-2009, 01:58 AM
That is some awesome looking work man. I have a question though, when doing the retaining walls out of the large bolders, do you do them similar to a block retaining wall? Do you put down your base material and install a drain pipe behind them? Or do you just set the bolders right on the dirt (It can't be that easy haha) I have always wondered how those are built and how they last like that.

monstermog1964
03-26-2009, 11:00 AM
The way I have read engineered walls and plans is pretty much the same in rock walls. Your toe is the most important. So let's say your building a 4' wall. Figure 5' - 1' in the ground. Next you will put in your drainage pipe. Make sure the 4" socked pipe is in a dirt channel at the lowest point. Drain won't work if it just sitting behind the rock. Next make sure you have flow wherever your drainage is going. Next I use a fabric up the rock and on the dirt facing hill then I drop carefully the clean 2" chip ballast over the top being careful not to damage the pipe. About 6" at the lowest point in width to 12-18" at the top. From there I continue building my wall till the desired heighth using ballast to support the rock if need be. At about 6" from the top I roll the fabric over the clean ballast then you can fill the rest up with dirt or sandy dirt. So it is very simular.

When I start the projects I will put out stakes with ribbons on them to let me know if I'm in line with my mark levels. So I hope this helps!

pitrack
03-26-2009, 11:23 AM
The way I have read engineered walls and plans is pretty much the same in rock walls. Your toe is the most important. So let's say your building a 4' wall. Figure 5' - 1' in the ground. Next you will put in your drainage pipe. Make sure the 4" socked pipe is in a dirt channel at the lowest point. Drain won't work if it just sitting behind the rock. Next make sure you have flow wherever your drainage is going. Next I use a fabric up the rock and on the dirt facing hill then I drop carefully the clean 2" chip ballast over the top being careful not to damage the pipe. About 6" at the lowest point in width to 12-18" at the top. From there I continue building my wall till the desired heighth using ballast to support the rock if need be. At about 6" from the top I roll the fabric over the clean ballast then you can fill the rest up with dirt or sandy dirt. So it is very simular.

When I start the projects I will put out stakes with ribbons on them to let me know if I'm in line with my mark levels. So I hope this helps!

Thank you, so do you use a base material for these types of walla or just dirt? And when you say put the drain pipe in a dirt channel at the lowest point, do you actually mean "dirt" or the backfill material?
Thanks

dave k
03-26-2009, 06:09 PM
Great Job!! Now it just needs some lighting!!

And all the people said AMEN! You tell them Joey!

monstermog1964
03-26-2009, 11:53 PM
Thank you, so do you use a base material for these types of walla or just dirt? And when you say put the drain pipe in a dirt channel at the lowest point, do you actually mean "dirt" or the backfill material?
Thanks

If the toe or dirt for the toe is sandy I will use this as a base to start from. If it's clay or dirt I will remove an extra 6" and put down a pad from crushed gravel or 2" minus. This will also make your pipe an extra 6" lower as you still need dig a tray for the pipe to sit in. As the water fills up it is forced into the top of the pipe through the holes. Without the channel the water will flow out of the pipe/around it. This is the way I do it. A trenching shovel works well along with a laser to set your grade for the pipe. Alot of people I have worked with don't take the time and just shove the pipe in the back and call in drainage. So there's a many right ways depending on the situation and there are many more wrong ways. If you work :weightlifter: this hard to put in a nice wall you want it done right. The last thing you want is for your wall to be dipping or look off to something that runs horizontal to the house thus making it worse. So what happens when you don't use a pad or ballast with fabric. Leaching of dirt being filtered through the rock then you get stains in your brick. Same with a rock wall. Without the proper set up with a pad and ballast you run the big rish of wasting alot of money and having crooked, dipping, falling over brick wall. It's more of a pain to fix a crooked wall than doing it right the first time and enjoying the wall for years to come. So let's say you have 17' like I did. Well I divided the height into 2 sections horizontally and set back the top wall 2-3' per section thus giving you 4 total walls. Prep is everything in setting your walls up. Make sure you take your time to draw out your drainage or put it in a program and don't be afraid to stop and get help if you feel uncomfortable with something that doesn't seem right. :gmctruck:

pitrack
03-27-2009, 01:25 AM
If the toe or dirt for the toe is sandy I will use this as a base to start from. If it's clay or dirt I will remove an extra 6" and put down a pad from crushed gravel or 2" minus. This will also make your pipe an extra 6" lower as you still need dig a tray for the pipe to sit in. As the water fills up it is forced into the top of the pipe through the holes. Without the channel the water will flow out of the pipe/around it. This is the way I do it. A trenching shovel works well along with a laser to set your grade for the pipe. Alot of people I have worked with don't take the time and just shove the pipe in the back and call in drainage. So there's a many right ways depending on the situation and there are many more wrong ways. If you work :weightlifter: this hard to put in a nice wall you want it done right. The last thing you want is for your wall to be dipping or look off to something that runs horizontal to the house thus making it worse. So what happens when you don't use a pad or ballast with fabric. Leaching of dirt being filtered through the rock then you get stains in your brick. Same with a rock wall. Without the proper set up with a pad and ballast you run the big rish of wasting alot of money and having crooked, dipping, falling over brick wall. It's more of a pain to fix a crooked wall than doing it right the first time and enjoying the wall for years to come. So let's say you have 17' like I did. Well I divided the height into 2 sections horizontally and set back the top wall 2-3' per section thus giving you 4 total walls. Prep is everything in setting your walls up. Make sure you take your time to draw out your drainage or put it in a program and don't be afraid to stop and get help if you feel uncomfortable with something that doesn't seem right. :gmctruck:

Thanks for all the advice! I would love to try one of these some day soon, of course on a much smaller scale:laugh: