PDA

View Full Version : Sod Job


Sherry Lawn and Landscape
03-28-2009, 04:52 AM
pics of a sod job and some of the crew.

Sherry Lawn and Landscape
03-28-2009, 05:01 AM
here they are...

Sherry Lawn and Landscape
03-28-2009, 05:04 AM
one more can't find the rest..:hammerhead:

DRBLawnBuster
03-28-2009, 09:07 AM
Looks like nice job to start the season off

sandman23
03-28-2009, 11:33 AM
What kind of sod is that? I can't get any kind of sod to grow under shade here. Fescue sod looks beautiful off the pallett and for a couple months after, but it tends to smother out quickly with July temps. Zoysia is my next choice for shade but it still needs sun. We are in a difficult zone because we get pretty high temps and also a freeze as well.

Sherry Lawn and Landscape
03-28-2009, 12:52 PM
What kind of sod is that? I can't get any kind of sod to grow under shade here. Fescue sod looks beautiful off the pallett and for a couple months after, but it tends to smother out quickly with July temps. Zoysia is my next choice for shade but it still needs sun. We are in a difficult zone because we get pretty high temps and also a freeze as well.

This job was all blue grass. It grows well in the shade and the customer really likes it. The Zoysia should love the heat. It does go dormit fast and takes for ever to green up. How about Bermuda grass??

KrayzKajun
03-28-2009, 01:00 PM
looks good!!

lawnproslawncare
03-28-2009, 01:35 PM
Man, I was taught to "step" sod pattern more than that. I'm not saying what you do doesn't work. Maybe I can get away with the way you do it and avoid a lot of cutting

Lawnworks
03-28-2009, 05:59 PM
Man, I was taught to "step" sod pattern more than that. I'm not saying what you do doesn't work. Maybe I can get away with the way you do it and avoid a lot of cutting

If it is going to root in a few days, I would not worry about stepping... maybe in the dead of winter on a hill, but even then you are going to be using sod staples... stepping might be burning your man hours.

Kennedy Landscaping
03-28-2009, 10:07 PM
Looks nice, I wish I got jobs like that lol

Chestnut Oaks Prez
03-28-2009, 10:27 PM
This job was all blue grass. It grows well in the shade and the customer really likes it. The Zoysia should love the heat. It does go dormit fast and takes for ever to green up. How about Bermuda grass??

Bermuda ain't worth a crap in shade:laugh:

teamgreendude
03-29-2009, 12:08 PM
where in kc are you I'm based out of prairie village kansas and have wright mowers sthil small engines and soon to be f-350 truck along with a wells cargo enclosed 20 footer

PerfectEarth
03-29-2009, 01:44 PM
NEVER lay sod like that- with the rolls all stacked up evenly. You should always stagger the rolls like bricks, no matter what the conditions. It's better for new establishment, moisture retention, strength... at it looks more professional! Sorry for being critical, but this is a rookie mistake.

riverwalklandscaping
03-29-2009, 03:11 PM
Just curious but the dirt under the sod looks pretty compacted. Did you loosen it up before you laid the sod? Also are those just leaves or is it litter or something all in the ground. I also usually wet the dirt just before I put the sod down to ensure it is going into a nice moist environment. We usually do a step pattern with sod too... only because it's how I was told it should be done, never understood what the difference is (other than that there are no '4 way intersections'), but it's what we do.

Lawnworks
03-29-2009, 06:04 PM
I cannot believe you guys are making a big deal out of staggering sod. New establishment?? Moisture retention??? I am willing to bet $100 you cannot tell the difference b/t a staggered job and a non-staggered job... you couldn't tell w/ my jobs as you cannot see the joints!

The thing that sets sod jobs off is having a border row around all of the edges and of course getting the sod jointed together as close as possible, then rolling the sod. I never moisten the sod before I put it down... what a mucky mess! Especially if you use a skid steer to move pallets around.

This is why you don't post pics of your jobs on lawnsite... because some boob will pick apart ANY job.

Bustus
03-29-2009, 07:02 PM
lol. I always stagger but mostly for initial appearance. I think I've gotten down pretty well to an art and it doesn't take up too much more time. With regards to the other benefits, I don't know for sure.

I do know that unless all of the sod pieces are exactly the same length and aren't strecthed at all, it can look quite sloppy as you wont get a true line, which make staggering look better.

I also moisten the soil a bit just before laying, usually when the temperature is higher. Again, I don't know that it makes a big difference as it is soak right after the job is done, but its just one of those things that seems to make the job last. In my 6 years I have received nothing but compliments for my sod work.

PerfectEarth
03-29-2009, 07:31 PM
I cannot believe you guys are making a big deal out of staggering sod. New establishment?? Moisture retention??? I am willing to bet $100 you cannot tell the difference b/t a staggered job and a non-staggered job... you couldn't tell w/ my jobs as you cannot see the joints!

Laying sod is certainly not rocket science. But there are a few rules and staggering the rolls is one of them. There are benefits and it's just the proper way to do it. Search "laying sod," visit some sites, and every one will include instructions to lay in a "brick-like" pattern. A few examples-

"Remember, this is a live plant and is subject to damage from the elements. Lay the sod in an overlaying pattern, staggering the joints in each row in a brick-like fashion."

"...and start installing the sod by staggering the alternating rows to prevent wash out and facilitate growth."

"Start laying sod by staggering each piece similar to the way bricks are laid. This staggering will also support the new sod and keep entire rows from sliding off a slope."

Lawnworks
03-29-2009, 09:20 PM
Laying sod is certainly not rocket science. But there are a few rules and staggering the rolls is one of them. There are benefits and it's just the proper way to do it. Search "laying sod," visit some sites, and every one will include instructions to lay in a "brick-like" pattern. A few examples-

"Remember, this is a live plant and is subject to damage from the elements. Lay the sod in an overlaying pattern, staggering the joints in each row in a brick-like fashion."

"...and start installing the sod by staggering the alternating rows to prevent wash out and facilitate growth."

"Start laying sod by staggering each piece similar to the way bricks are laid. This staggering will also support the new sod and keep entire rows from sliding off a slope."


I have never googled "how to lay sod." Stagger if you like but no one will ever know the difference. Your bottom line might notice after it takes a hit because of your wasted productivity. If the area to be sodded is flat or nearly flat, there is ABSOLUTELY no advantage to staggering. Remember sod roots in 7 days.

And like I said, the only areas you are going to have wash out are on a STEEP slope. Only then is extra care is needed, and staggering is still not going to prevent washout without sod staples.

Oh and how in the hell does staggering sod "faciltate growth?"

PerfectEarth
03-29-2009, 10:20 PM
Why do you think bricks are laid they way they are? Have you ever seen pavers laid out end to end and right alond side each other?? It's the same concept when sodding. Staggering is better for establishment, the overall layout is stronger when pulled tight, and the jobs looks permanent sooner, rather than later... Think about it, 4 corners of sod that meet up like this (+) will tend to dry out and loose moisture much faster than this (T).

I'm not going to argue anymore. This is pretty much a basic landscape 101 rule- you're not gonna find any seasoned landscape professional who knows what he's doing to tell you otherwise. I've worked on golf courses, estates and with the largest sod supplier in my area. I've laid countless semi-trailers of fescue, midnight bluegrass, and sodded bentgrass on tees and fairways (very detailed work). And I've told countless guys NOT to lay end to end, row to row... It's the first thing that an untrained crew will do.

And productivity?? Hahaha, ok. If it takes so much extra time to stagger your rolls and do the job correctly, I guess I'll start accounting for it... that's too funny.

lawnproslawncare
03-29-2009, 10:36 PM
So I was trained right PERFECT EARTH. I was always told to stagger and when I saw that I scratched my head. I'm pretty new to the biz but I picked my training up from the super before I years ago.

Sherry Lawn and Landscape
03-30-2009, 05:40 AM
NEVER lay sod like that- with the rolls all stacked up evenly. You should always stagger the rolls like bricks, no matter what the conditions. It's better for new establishment, moisture retention, strength... at it looks more professional! Sorry for being critical, but this is a rookie mistake.


Yeah, We did stagger you did not see the REST OF THE PICS LIKE I SAID!! thats my crew, we got it looking "so beautiful",oh and that sod is doing great!! the customer loves it!! getting ready to do 1,950 sq ft more on another property of his. I:waving:

Sherry Lawn and Landscape
03-30-2009, 05:56 AM
I cannot believe you guys are making a big deal out of staggering sod. New establishment?? Moisture retention??? I am willing to bet $100 you cannot tell the difference b/t a staggered job and a non-staggered job... you couldn't tell w/ my jobs as you cannot see the joints!

The thing that sets sod jobs off is having a border row around all of the edges and of course getting the sod jointed together as close as possible, then rolling the sod. I never moisten the sod before I put it down... what a mucky mess! Especially if you use a skid steer to move pallets around.

This is why you don't post pics of your jobs on lawnsite... because some boob will pick apart ANY job.

YEAH!! thats for sure! That job that crew did looks great!! got it done! :gunsfirin

JohnnyRocker
04-27-2009, 11:40 AM
Job looks great!!

Jmill88
04-27-2009, 08:22 PM
Just picked up a new customer that just got new sod. How long should I wait to cut it?