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Utahlandscaping
03-28-2009, 02:14 PM
Some of the work posted here is fabulous. Here are a couple pics of a job we did the lighting on. I will try and round up some more lighting pictures. It's one of the best parts of landscaping.

http://i191.photobucket.com/albums/z312/rastapope/_MG_5958.jpg

INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting
03-28-2009, 05:07 PM
Are you open to critques, in order to improve your skills?

MAGLIGHTING
03-28-2009, 06:08 PM
Some of the work posted here is fabulous. Here are a couple pics of a job we did the lighting on. I will try and round up some more lighting pictures. It's one of the best parts of landscaping.

http://i191.photobucket.com/albums/z312/rastapope/_MG_5958.jpg

Wow, what a shame, lost opportunity for downlighting out of that beautiful tree on to patio and walkway in lieu of those hot spots on the ground. Seems to be a hot spot on the trunk about 5' off the ground and nothing above that in the tree canopy. Was it the quality of the photo or the project lighting design in which you are referring?

BrandonV
03-28-2009, 09:33 PM
did you build the waterfall? how about some pics of that, looks like a neat setup.

Utahlandscaping
03-29-2009, 11:33 AM
Are you open to critques, in order to improve your skills?

Of course...we are always looking to improve our product. Constructive criticism is not something I'm scared of.

I like the point you made in regards to having a light shine down on the patio. This customer is the type of guy who is always willing to make improvements. Thanks for the input!

Utahlandscaping
03-29-2009, 11:40 AM
did you build the waterfall? how about some pics of that, looks like a neat setup.

This is the only one I have on my computer at the moment but I will try and round up some more.

http://i191.photobucket.com/albums/z312/rastapope/_MG_5938.jpg

Also, here is a video that is done entirely in that yard. If you look closely you will see the water feature in the back ground on a few different occasions.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ve2EZaoEPVg&eurl=http%3A%2F%2Fwww%2Eutahlandscaping%2Ecom%2Fut%2Dlandscaping%2Dvideos%2D0%2DC%2DC%2DLandscaping% 2DSoftscaping%2Ehtml&feature=player_embedded

EOL
04-01-2009, 01:25 AM
Nice landscape and waterscape design. Becareful when selecting pathlights to be installed on steep grades like in your last pic. I bet that stone stair case goes up quite a ways and every pathlight that you installed just makes into an unattractive glare bomb! Nice video though.

INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting
04-01-2009, 03:20 AM
Some of the work posted here is fabulous. Here are a couple pics of a job we did the lighting on. I will try and round up some more lighting pictures. It's one of the best parts of landscaping.

http://i191.photobucket.com/albums/z312/rastapope/_MG_5958.jpg

Okay here goes: My recommendations to you to improve the lighting design and application shown in this photo...

1: Where you have used downlighting it would appear that the fixture is not very high up in the tree. That is why you have such a small circle of intense light on the path below the tree in the foreground. Move your fixutres much higher up into the trees to create a nice, wide, soft pattern on the ground.

2: Make better use of the downlighting opportunities that you have there. Those tall trees in the background look like viable options for moonlighting the patio area where the lounge chairs are.

3: Combine the use of uplighting and down lighting around principal trees. This always makes them stand out as features and visual destinations, adding both depth and drama to the setting.

4: Reduce your use of small flood/wash fixtures on the rock garden. Instead try to use a larger format fixture, hidden at the edge of the path, illuminating more of the area in the rock garden with softer more even effect. Personally, I would have headed to the trees at the top of the hill and attempted to downlight that whole area in a very soft flood. Then use some uplights in the trees in the foreground to add visual interest.

5: Find the structures in the scene and make them focal points. Instead of putting a path light beside the patio area, thus making that foot bridge in the background disappear behind the relatively light patio area, I would have lit the bridge and downlit the path/patio. This would add more depth to the setting after dark.

6: Watch your use of specific pathlights installed on elevations. You have to pick carefully for these locations so as not to create glare to the viewer when they are traversing a path that is lower than the fixtures installed on the steps above. Direct line of sight to the lamp is a no-no.

7: Take your photos later in the evening! There is so much ambient light that it takes away from the lighting system.

8: Watch out for over-illumination. It is better to use more fixtures at lower wattages than it is to use fewer that are brighter. Even with all that ambient light from the sky, there are several burning bright hot spots. This can only be worse when it is dark out. Try re-lamping those path lights (and maybe some of the floods) with lower wattage lamps. Less is more.

Have a great day.

Tomwilllight
04-02-2009, 05:57 PM
Okay here goes: My recommendations to you to improve the lighting design and application shown in this photo...

1: Where you have used downlighting it would appear that the fixture is not very high up in the tree. That is why you have such a small circle of intense light on the path below the tree in the foreground. Move your fixutres much higher up into the trees to create a nice, wide, soft pattern on the ground.

2: Make better use of the downlighting opportunities that you have there. Those tall trees in the background look like viable options for moonlighting the patio area where the lounge chairs are.

3: Combine the use of uplighting and down lighting around principal trees. This always makes them stand out as features and visual destinations, adding both depth and drama to the setting.

4: Reduce your use of small flood/wash fixtures on the rock garden. Instead try to use a larger format fixture, hidden at the edge of the path, illuminating more of the area in the rock garden with softer more even effect. Personally, I would have headed to the trees at the top of the hill and attempted to downlight that whole area in a very soft flood. Then use some uplights in the trees in the foreground to add visual interest.

5: Find the structures in the scene and make them focal points. Instead of putting a path light beside the patio area, thus making that foot bridge in the background disappear behind the relatively light patio area, I would have lit the bridge and downlit the path/patio. This would add more depth to the setting after dark.

6: Watch your use of specific pathlights installed on elevations. You have to pick carefully for these locations so as not to create glare to the viewer when they are traversing a path that is lower than the fixtures installed on the steps above. Direct line of sight to the lamp is a no-no.

7: Take your photos later in the evening! There is so much ambient light that it takes away from the lighting system.

8: Watch out for over-illumination. It is better to use more fixtures at lower wattages than it is to use fewer that are brighter. Even with all that ambient light from the sky, there are several burning bright hot spots. This can only be worse when it is dark out. Try re-lamping those path lights (and maybe some of the floods) with lower wattage lamps. Less is more.

Have a great day.

Utahlandscaping,

Pay attention and learn something.

The critique you received above is excellent!

Outstanding critique James! I couldn't have done it better.

Tom