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View Full Version : Sealing pavers


eps
04-04-2009, 05:22 PM
I was wondering if any of you seal paver walkways and patios? What are the pros and cons of sealing? How often do they get re-sealed I live in Upstate NY, will this shorten the time between sealings?

AllHardscaping
04-06-2009, 03:41 AM
I use to seal pavers- out of the biz now... but it does make them look great if you use a wet look sealer. Sealing protects color, prevents staining, rsists salt, etc.. not to mention the aesthetic appearnce. longevity all depnds on sealer type.

eps
04-07-2009, 08:32 AM
So why are you out of the biz? Any thing I should really avoid like the plague when sealing? Any tips to make it easier? Any help is great!

JimLewis
04-08-2009, 11:48 AM
I've always heard you have to wait a while (like a year) before you seal pavers. In fact, I think it says that right on the can of techni-seal or whatever that product is.

I've heard it's because the pavers have salt in them from the curing process and this salt has to leech out before you seal them otherwise it makes the seal all fall apart. Anyway, I've always told people they need to wait a year before sealing and I've read that and heard that many times. I always tell people we can come back in a year and seal it but I haven't ever had anyone call us back to do it yet.

'Course I've only been doing pavers for about 3 years now. So it hasn't been a long time. But we do quite a lot of them per year nowadays.

neighborguy
04-08-2009, 04:48 PM
Jim, I heard the same thing I am not really a proponant of sealing but if you do you are supposed to wait a year or so. I have been doing hardscapes for 12 years and have only sealed 2 patios.

JimLewis
04-09-2009, 01:50 AM
I guess if we were smart we'd call back those happy customers who we did the paver installs for last year and the year before and sell them on sealing it now, huh? Seems I'm always looking for new clients but probably guilty of not following up enough with my existing, happy clients....

STL Ponds and Waterfalls
04-09-2009, 09:07 PM
I guess if we were smart we'd call back those happy customers who we did the paver installs for last year and the year before and sell them on sealing it now, huh? Seems I'm always looking for new clients but probably guilty of not following up enough with my existing, happy clients....

Unfortunately I'm guilty as well, until this year. lol!

capelawncare.com
04-10-2009, 10:14 AM
I am laying a patio at my own personal residence. I am using an "Old Chicago" brick. Can I seal it? Or should I seal it? I like the wet look too.

Thanks!

Mid-Ohio Scaper
04-11-2009, 09:28 AM
When I seal pavers I use Surebond sealers. You don't have to wait to apply the sealer because it allows the paver to breath without letting anything stain the paver. It's really pretty neat.
I was unsure about sealers until a couple of years ago, I attended a Surebond clinic and it really enlightened me on how far sealers have come.

I know this may sound like I'm trying to sell Surebond stuff, I'm not. I just think they have a great product. Check into sealers for yourself, you'll be amazed and your customer will be amazed at the color and richness it pulls out of your work!

AllHardscaping
04-11-2009, 02:02 PM
So why are you out of the biz? Any thing I should really avoid like the plague when sealing? Any tips to make it easier? Any help is great!

I got out of it to pursue a sales career. It was a great business but you NEED reliable responsible laborers to install it. Sealer is very easy to screw up. I found muself on almost all sealer jobs and felt like I had to be there to make sure everything was done correctly. At the time good help was hard to find and my HR skills are not that great.

If you are considering sealing soley be sure you figure your season. Most sealers need to have 50 degree or better temps. Even above the condensation at night could limit your work days.

Sealer is a great add on biz if you have a guy or two that is kind of anal about things looking great and can solve proboems on his own.

Nothing toavois like the plague. Just make sure you are educated and experienced before you take the 10,000 sq ft estate driveway jobs.

AllHardscaping
04-11-2009, 02:06 PM
I've always heard you have to wait a while (like a year) before you seal pavers. In fact, I think it says that right on the can of techni-seal or whatever that product is.

I've heard it's because the pavers have salt in them from the curing process and this salt has to leech out before you seal them otherwise it makes the seal all fall apart. Anyway, I've always told people they need to wait a year before sealing and I've read that and heard that many times. I always tell people we can come back in a year and seal it but I haven't ever had anyone call us back to do it yet.

'Course I've only been doing pavers for about 3 years now. So it hasn't been a long time. But we do quite a lot of them per year nowadays.

Most pavers do have effloresence - the whitish chalky look. As the pavers become wet and then dry again the efflo rises to the surface. It is best to wait 6 months before sealing with a solvent based sealer. Even then you will most likely need to clean with an efflo cleaner.

The longer you wait the better as the efflo rises more naturally and you wont have to use as much chemicals on the pavers.

Some sealer say you can apply right away as they are breathable and allow the efflo to escape. This is true for light efflo. Dont seal over pavers with heavy or even medium efflo. It is always best to start with a clean surface.

AllHardscaping
04-11-2009, 02:08 PM
I guess if we were smart we'd call back those happy customers who we did the paver installs for last year and the year before and sell them on sealing it now, huh? Seems I'm always looking for new clients but probably guilty of not following up enough with my existing, happy clients....

If someone calls you back for a warranty issue, like some mild settling ina probelm area or whatever the case might be you can try to sell them on sealer so the trip isn't a total writeoff.