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View Full Version : Obal Landscaping: some before and afters


ejojr
04-06-2009, 06:54 PM
Some renovation pics from a recent job. Now we have to work on the lawn!

South Florida Lawns
04-06-2009, 07:09 PM
Cool but it looks like you planted the tree in front of the window too close to the house.

KrayzKajun
04-06-2009, 07:21 PM
nice work!!!!

ejojr
04-06-2009, 07:41 PM
So Fla Lawns,

If you're referring to the Blue Spruce, it's a dwarf, which will max out at about 7-8'. It's not a Colorado Blue Spruce, which gets 30-40' tall.

Tyler7692
04-06-2009, 07:57 PM
Looks good. What is retaining the stones in the 4th pic? Steel edging?

Gotta love the dwarf gold mops cypress... great color contrast, especially on that dark mulch.

Tyler7692
04-06-2009, 08:02 PM
Forgot to add, I like the small burm you added, as well as the row of boxwoods.

ejojr
04-06-2009, 08:13 PM
Thanks Tyler. The wall stones are a product by EP Henry. They are big here in the Northeast. They make pavers and retaining walls. It's a masonary block- sand, stone and cement with a dye for color. Will try to post some other pics.

Kennedy Landscaping
04-06-2009, 08:15 PM
Nice work. I like the new mulch.

ejojr
04-06-2009, 08:29 PM
Here are a few more jobs that have EP Henry walls and pavers- it's agreat product, and really compliments the landscape

slamjamrockinman
04-06-2009, 08:45 PM
Beautiful work!! Did you do the design work??

ejojr
04-06-2009, 08:51 PM
thanks, slamjam. Yes, I do all the design work myself. Sometimes that's harder than actually installing the job. My guys just work off of a reduced scale blueprint, so they know exactly what goes where. If it works on paper, it will work on site. (most of the time!)

JosephLawnCare
04-07-2009, 09:43 AM
How did the grass get that way? Did that place sit empty all summer?

Green Finger
04-07-2009, 01:23 PM
nice work. very professional

Florida Gardener
04-07-2009, 04:31 PM
AWESOME work! looks very nice.

ejojr
04-07-2009, 06:56 PM
The lawn got that way from a lack of irrigation system, fertilization program, and regular maintenance, which recently got corrected. Also had grubs and chinch bugs, killers here in NJ

2brothersyardcare
04-07-2009, 08:07 PM
looks great

ejojr
04-07-2009, 09:05 PM
2 more from the archives- an older home the guy wanted to fix up for his wife, and breaking out some cracked belgium block and re-doing the front walkway

Tyler7692
04-07-2009, 09:15 PM
Superb. How many guys work for you, and are you personally on every jobsite? How do you go about designing these, on paper or computer?

How does your typical job go (From introduction with customer to finished job)?

And one more question, do you show your customers paper designs or a computer generated image so they they too can envision the landscape? Sometimes we landscapers can see the finished product in our heads but customers can't.

One more thing, do you keep mulch and small rocks like that in stock, or go to a supplier?

Sorry for all the questions. Great work, keep it up. Do you have a website?

grassman177
04-07-2009, 11:27 PM
i think super, and worth good money.

ejojr
04-08-2009, 07:23 AM
Tyler,

I typically run 4 guys early Spring and late fall. During peak season I usually run 6 guys, 2 crews of 3, or all together on big jobs. I am personally on site on almost every dseign/install or renovation job. I don't go out with my guys for the basics- clean-ups, re-mulching, pruning, etc. They can handle that while I track down new work. I just do designs on paper, along with a picture book of my work for reference. I used to use computer software, but found that it doesn't always present a realistic image, and customers are disappointed. It shows everything in bloom, which is only a few weeks a year, and many plants I use aren't in the directory, as well as a ton of plants that aren't even used in my area. Typical job: customer calls, return call same day, if possible. set up appt. Meet with customer, discuss their needs, expectations, budget. Go back and lay out design, stop back with scketch, pictures, and estimate. Discuss price and timeframe. Get a deposit, schedule a date.
I do stock mulch, stone, top soil, and boulders in bulk. I get wholesale pricing, and it's much easier to load early AM in my yard, then to run all over to garden centers. Finally, I have a business email, but no website (yet). 95% of my work is referral and repeat business- I don't even have a yellow pages ad. Getting a lead from a referral is much better than someone going thru the yellow pages or searching the internet. I am always busy, but took many years to get to this point. Reputation is everything. The work will always follow.

MDLawn
04-08-2009, 10:45 AM
You do some really great work. You really seem to have an eye for designing each landscape. I've done some really small scale landscapes but man would I feel lost on designing one for a landscape like those. If you don't mind me asking, for those large installs what is the average time frame to get all the work done (just the installation stuff, not the design and consult)? Also how many of those larger installs do you average per season? Just kinda curious. Again great work.

ejojr
04-08-2009, 09:38 PM
Believe it or not, once all the plant material and top soil, stone, etc is there, most plant jobs are done in 2 days or less, a lot of them 1 day. But sometimes you need a day to prep the site- rip out the old landscape, cut out the beds, etc.
It's the hardscapes that take time- walls, walkways, etc. It could be a week or more just getting the hardscape done 1st.

But to answer your question, a "typical" job would take about 30-45 minutes to measure out, 2-3 hours to lay out the sketch and design the job, about an hour to price it out (I itemize everything), then about an hour with the customer to explain it and show pictures. Then a day to round up the plant material and order stone, etc. Then, like I said, 1-2 days to do the install. That's all the customer sees, is your time on their property, but all that other work has to be done, and that needs to be factored into the price quote.

In a good year, I'll do maybe 12-15 jobs of that size. The way the economy is now I might be lucky to get 7 or 8 this year, although I have 2 on the books for this month already.

MDLawn
04-08-2009, 11:05 PM
Sounds like you've got it down to get it done. Yea I was suprised how quickly my landscape went in when I did it. The biggest pain was getting out these old taxus/yews that must have been there since the house was built so many years ago, only because I didn't have a piece of equipment to pull them out. Got a machine to spread the 6-7 yards of topsoil though, I didnt feel like moving 16,000lbs of dirt by hand!! But the rest is pretty straight forward with the plants. Haven't done hardscaping yet but have attended a few seminars and read a lot of guides form manufacturers. Hopefully soon. Thanks for the response and hopefully you can keep getting jobs!

ejojr
04-11-2009, 04:07 PM
One thing I noticed in many of the pics is that most guys just have a pick-up truck pulling a trailer. How do you get by without at least 1 dump truck? How to you unload debris, pick up mulch, stone, top soil, etc? Enclosed is a pic of my trucks, etc. I have a F-150 FX4 for estimates and light duty, 3 F-350 MAson dumps, a Ford 1715 tractor with a york rake, and a catepillar loader for laoding materials in my yard. (Not picured are my 3 trailers, and all my other equipment, way too much to list). When a job calls for 5 yards of mulch, what do you guys do? And what do you do with the leaves and branches when doing a clean-up? Almost everyone here in the Northeast has dumps and rack body dumps.

ejojr
04-11-2009, 04:13 PM
well the pic didn't make it thru, try it again. Guess it has to be clicked on to open. It's a Micrsoft word document.

STIHL GUY
04-11-2009, 04:56 PM
wow looks pretty nice

blsmonroe
04-12-2009, 01:15 AM
I've seen you guys around town, you do great work.
Just curious where your yard is. Is it on a large residential lot or commercial? My partner and I have been trying to find a place locally to buy and keep equipment and also store matierals at but have had zero luck so far.

ejojr
04-12-2009, 07:46 AM
I rented on a commercial property on Cranbury Rd for 15 years. Recently moved to a farm in Old bridge, while awaiting to buy a commercial property in Monroe, that has some legal issues right now holding things up. It is tough right now....zoning has to be approved, or you need farm assessed, or a huge, private residential property where nobody will be around you. Good luck in your search.

deere615
04-12-2009, 06:53 PM
I think that black mulch goes very nicely with the brick house and plantings

ejojr
04-12-2009, 07:08 PM
Dude, only 18 years old and 3 years in business already. Wow. I give you credit. A 48 Stander with Rapid height is an awesome machine. My guys run 3 42's and a 52, all Standers. Plus we have a 60 Lazer Z for bigger jobs. But the average account around here is 1/4 to 1/2 acre- most have pools, fences, etc.

Plus you're from Pittsburgh, home of my favorite team, the Steelers! I come out there for games 3 or 4 times a year. How is the landscaping market out there right now? Best of luck growing your business.

deere615
04-13-2009, 11:05 PM
Dude, only 18 years old and 3 years in business already. Wow. I give you credit. A 48 Stander with Rapid height is an awesome machine. My guys run 3 42's and a 52, all Standers. Plus we have a 60 Lazer Z for bigger jobs. But the average account around here is 1/4 to 1/2 acre- most have pools, fences, etc.

Plus you're from Pittsburgh, home of my favorite team, the Steelers! I come out there for games 3 or 4 times a year. How is the landscaping market out there right now? Best of luck growing your business.

Hey thanks man. Yeah U just got the stander a week ago! yeah I cut smaller size lots like you also, the stander will make a few of the bigger ones go faster, but the 36 and 21 still get used alot. Its hard to tell I don't have all the customers I had last year but some of them I really dont want. I am really hoping to add some bigger lawns to really put the stander to work, but I dunno. I am somewhat busy right now but the market still seems a bit slow, I am hoping it picks up. Yep everyone here loves the steelers, but actually I have never been to a game

ejojr
05-15-2009, 08:57 PM
A small, simple job from today. 1/2 day with 2 guys. Weather has been awesome here in NJ, when it's not raining!

IMAGE
05-15-2009, 09:18 PM
A small, simple job from today. 1/2 day with 2 guys. Weather has been awesome here in NJ, when it's not raining!

What do you use for base/leveling material under your blocks? How deep are you putting it and are what are you compacting with? Also, what do you use to it dig out there, if your digging 6" or more below the lowest block, do you just do it with a shovel or do you use a mini ho?

TXNSLighting
05-16-2009, 01:37 PM
wow, those large pathlights really take away from the first landscape...otherwise looks great.

flairland
05-16-2009, 03:33 PM
wow, those large pathlights really take away from the first landscape...otherwise looks great.

That picture is a 'before' picture, he took out the pathlights on his install, lol.

You do top notch work ejojr! Everything looks awesome.

ejojr
05-16-2009, 09:18 PM
that small wall in the last pic is only 12", 15" with the cap. Just trenched the soil, used a hand tamper, and compacted and leveled some stone dust. For larger walls, we put in a QP base (quarry process), just like under pavers, and use a vibrating plate tamper. My rule of thumb is 2" buried for every 12" of wall height, so The most we ever bury is 6"
or so, becaue I'll rarely build a wall over 3' high. Maybe 2 or 3 times in many years I've rented a mini excavator to dig out, but only because of the length of the wall, or the hardness of the soil. We also glue the walls with a masonary adhesive, instead of pins.