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SKIQUATTRO
05-21-2009, 10:00 AM
Location: Long Island, NY

I applied Milorganite at Easter time and again yesterday to my lawn. My local garden shop says thats only fertilizer i will need.. apply again July 4, Labor day and then around Thanksgiving. My PH was tested and is within the range so no lime was applied this year....should i stick with their suggestion or does my lawn need more nutrients found in other fertilizers? The lawn is looking plush and green.....

bigslick7878
05-21-2009, 09:33 PM
Location: Long Island, NY

I applied Milorganite at Easter time and again yesterday to my lawn. My local garden shop says thats only fertilizer i will need.. apply again July 4, Labor day and then around Thanksgiving. My PH was tested and is within the range so no lime was applied this year....should i stick with their suggestion or does my lawn need more nutrients found in other fertilizers? The lawn is looking plush and green.....

I think you just answered your own question.

roccon31
05-21-2009, 11:16 PM
milorganite is good stuff, shame it gets a bad rap for being "human". i use it extensively. lawns stay green longer in the fall, green for half the winter, then they are the first ones green in the spring. all from milorganite, nothing else.

WETSCAPE
05-25-2009, 11:02 PM
Yeah man!! It is great stuff!! Once you get the majority of weeds out of the lawn this stuff keeps the lawn great! You need NOTHING ELSE......

drugrep
05-25-2009, 11:35 PM
I'd like to know what your other numbers are. My lawn in very low in Phosphorus and I blend both organic and synthetic techniques.

I know a little about Microbiology and I don't believe 100% in the story the organic people say. I do believe in the importance of soil microbes and organic matter, but if you are low on things like K, P, Ca, Fe, then I have no issue in adding synthetic fertilizer.

I use synthetic starter fertilizer 5 times a year to try to raise my very low P, plus I use Milorganite 3 times a year for Organic Matter along with mulch mowing.

Smallaxe
05-26-2009, 08:44 AM
... I use synthetic starter fertilizer 5 times a year to try to raise my very low P, ...

Wow!!! Where do you imagine all that P is going? You must have a great storehouse of Locked up, bound up Phosphorus in all its various forms by now in the soil. Soil tests are not telling you the whole story at all.

You do know that P doesn't leach or evaporate like N does. As much as 80% of an application of P can just get locked up and inaccessible to the plant and the soil test.
(although soil test proponents will never admit to it)

It is doubtful that your lawn is low in P... How does your turf look?

terrapro
05-31-2009, 09:34 AM
Milorganite is good stuff. If for some reason thats all I could apply then I would still be happy.

What kind of organic matter is milorganite adding to the soil? The skeletons of the microbial content that were heated to 1200deg? :confused:

Starter fertilizer 5 times a year is abusive. There is no need for that much Phosphorus. If you really need that much there is an underlying reason you need to figure out. You are treating the symptom not the actual problem.

bigslick7878
05-31-2009, 07:16 PM
I have just started using milorganite on some selected properties for areas that are struggling for whatever reason.I like the idea that you cant really "overdo it" so to speak and can apply it as liberally as you want for the most part.

I am also going to try to use it to overall fertilize on a few smaller properties and see how it works.

Just put some down about 5 days ago on my lawn and will be mowing tomorrow,and then I can really see if there is any difference in the color and what not.It looks a little deeper green but Im not sure if that is because the grass is longer right now.

Smallaxe
05-31-2009, 11:47 PM
I have just started using milorganite on some selected properties for areas that are struggling for whatever reason.I like the idea that you cant really "overdo it" so to speak and can apply it as liberally as you want for the most part.

I am also going to try to use it to overall fertilize on a few smaller properties and see how it works.

Just put some down about 5 days ago on my lawn and will be mowing tomorrow,and then I can really see if there is any difference in the color and what not.It looks a little deeper green but Im not sure if that is because the grass is longer right now.

Depending on weather and microbrial activity - you may not see results any time soon... Milorganite is not compost... it relies on microbrial activity to get it to release the nutrients, that it holds...

bigslick7878
06-01-2009, 12:19 AM
Depending on weather and microbrial activity - you may not see results any time soon... Milorganite is not compost... it relies on microbrial activity to get it to release the nutrients, that it holds...

Weather? How?

And please explain about the "microbial activity" if you can.I have done a lot of reading on milorganite and don't know what you mean by that.

I know that growing conditions need to be ideal for microbial activity,and this time of year they are in my area.

terrapro
06-01-2009, 07:59 AM
Both weather and microbial content help break down the milorganite and make it available the plant life. Microbes handle a large portion of that load as well as many other things.

Grandview
06-01-2009, 08:24 AM
Weather? How?

And please explain about the "microbial activity" if you can.I have done a lot of reading on milorganite and don't know what you mean by that.

I know that growing conditions need to be ideal for microbial activity,and this time of year they are in my area.

Heat and moisture is needed to break down milorganite. Most of N will not be available until mid-summer.

Smallaxe
06-01-2009, 09:05 AM
Weather? How?

And please explain about the "microbial activity" if you can.I have done a lot of reading on milorganite and don't know what you mean by that.

I know that growing conditions need to be ideal for microbial activity,and this time of year they are in my area.

Ever drive by a farm in the spring time - after the manure had been frozen all winter. You can smell the N in the air on the first really warm day... like 50 degrees air temp. It is all microbial activity.

With all your reading... How does the plant get the N from the Milorganite pellet?

bigslick7878
06-01-2009, 07:52 PM
I read that when the soil temp is between 55 and 80,and moisture is available the microbial activity occurs to release the nitrogen.

In my area the soil temps are easily in that range and anywhere I put it will be getting watered.

Maybe in your neck of the woods it will take until summer for the heat,but not where I am at.We have had a lot of rain and above average temps for months now.

I would guess the soil is about 75 degrees right now if you go by a chart I looked at (take the 11 am temperature and add about 10 degrees)

BTW I just mowed my lawn for the first time after I applied the milorganite and it does look a little deeper green and fully in a few spots that were thin.I put it down a week ago,and since then we have had 2 decent rains and average temps of about 75 degrees.

RigglePLC
06-01-2009, 10:04 PM
Milorganite is 6-2-0. That means 25 percnet of nutrients are phosphorus. Too much, unless there is a defieciency on your particular soil. And potash is zero. Most grass would benefit from some potash--it increases resistance to stress, heat and disease.

Smallaxe
06-02-2009, 09:38 AM
I read that when the soil temp is between 55 and 80,and moisture is available the microbial activity occurs to release the nitrogen.

In my area the soil temps are easily in that range and anywhere I put it will be getting watered.

Maybe in your neck of the woods it will take until summer for the heat,but not where I am at.We have had a lot of rain and above average temps for months now.

I would guess the soil is about 75 degrees right now if you go by a chart I looked at (take the 11 am temperature and add about 10 degrees)

BTW I just mowed my lawn for the first time after I applied the milorganite and it does look a little deeper green and fully in a few spots that were thin.I put it down a week ago,and since then we have had 2 decent rains and average temps of about 75 degrees.

There is a lot we do know about microbial symbiosis with plant life in general, but there is so much more that we do not know.
Plants do rely on bacterial activity to gain nutrients of all kinds. If the plant is growing the bacteria need to be active as well.

I don't think the N in Milo. is water soluable but I could be wrong... the Fe in the stuff helps with colorizing your turf as well.

bigslick7878
06-08-2009, 08:16 PM
Been about 3 weeks now and I can definitely see a difference in the lawn I put it on.

Deep, dark green color throughout and it is very full,especially on one side of my yard that used to have a gravel driveway under it and usually struggles.

The weather has been perfect (5 days sun,2 days rain per week pretty much 78 degrees) so Im sure that helped but I still see a noticable difference in the color and thickness.

Very impressed.

muddstopper
06-10-2009, 11:20 PM
Milorganite is 6-2-0. That means 25 percnet of nutrients are phosphorus. Too much, unless there is a defieciency on your particular soil. And potash is zero. Most grass would benefit from some potash--it increases resistance to stress, heat and disease.

I fail to see where you get 25% P out of a 6-2-0 fertilizer. NPk are not the only nutrients in the milogranite. I also find it hard to believe that human manure doesnt contain some K, unless it is burnt off during the heating treatment.

The N in the manure is mostly Urea which will convert to Ammonium with just a little moisture and 50-60degree temps. The conversion is caused by the Urease microbes found naturally just about everywhere. In hot wet weather, it can nitrogen burn turf, the same as the chemical Urea fertilizer.