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View Full Version : Finally got a bid proposal, im confused


stevenf
06-10-2009, 10:54 PM
After days of phone calling I finally found out who to contact about some chain stores. I got them to fax me a lawn care bid proposal.
It is 9 pages long and not was I was expecting. I was expecting just a proposal of what they wanted done and what insurance coverage I was required to have and so on.....
The proposal I got is a little more demanding. It says " Biweekly maintenance shall be done for $______"
Thats about the only thing that pretains to lawn care. It is written more as a contract then a proposal. Doesnt have a start or end date which means it isnt a binding contract. It also says that If I am bidding more stores, I have to submit a bid pack for each induvidual store. This means I have to fax over 9 papers per store.

Questions: Are bid proposal(CONTRACTS) very common? Are they something to avoid? The contract says that you do not bill the store, you bill the company. It also says to submit a different bid for each store you want to bid on. Is this common to see one district branch have a different lawn service for each store?

tilawn
06-10-2009, 11:00 PM
you must be talking about USM or Level 1 Maintenance????

1wezil
06-11-2009, 10:16 AM
:cool2::cool2::cool2::cool2:

stevenf
06-11-2009, 02:05 PM
Sorry, but what is usm or level 1? Something to avoid?
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DA Quality Lawn & YS
06-11-2009, 02:21 PM
Jeez...

Run, don't walk, away from this one.

Do you really want someone telling you what to charge? Also, the bi-weekly maintenance deal is shaky, what about high growth times of the season - you will be mowing thru a jungle.

Finally, why do you want to sign THEIR contract? Who knows what's in there. They should be the ones entering into YOUR agreement.

Run far, far away.

Classified
06-11-2009, 02:28 PM
That sounds normal for commercial work. Small jobs like single owner strip malls and such aren't like that normally but chains and larger companies tell you exatcly what is to be done and is very specific. And that is also normal to have to submit a bid for each individual store. Some do it that way and some don't. My bid proposal is 3 pages long, it outlines thier requirements for each season and the pricing. Also you sign thier contract. You don't send them one. Commercial work can be very invasive to your company. Many times
They want multiple references, an equipment list, and one time a company wanted to see all company records for the last 3 years. I didn't sign that one which sux because it was good money.
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kaferhaus
06-11-2009, 03:22 PM
Everyone wants commercial work, yet they don't want the "hassle" of complying with all the paperwork.....

stevenf
06-11-2009, 03:28 PM
So are they expecting me to bid all the stores in the district or only the stores I want? Would they really have two or more companies serving the same district? I think I'm going to submit a bid once I learn a little more. I could really use the money and roadside advertising.
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Classified
06-11-2009, 04:39 PM
Well that's what you need to figure out. What did you tell them when you asked to bid? Seems like you need to ask more questions. Also, is the contract through a manegement company or direct with the company?

If you want to do commercial expect to have 2 mil liability, workmans comp, and the know how, resources, and equipment to handle all tasks including all landscaping, chemical apps, and possibly irrigation. Most commercial isn't a walk in the park like residentials typically are.
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DA Quality Lawn & YS
06-11-2009, 06:55 PM
I'd like to think if most LCO's said the heck with these commercial properties' over-the-top paperwork requirements and didn't bid them, they would loosen up. Let em starve. I know they want to cover their rears, but what is outlined above is just ridiculous. Again, no way I am letting someone tell me how much I will get paid for a job when I own the LCO.

steven - why don't you dump this one and go bid some small businesses and nice resi's. You will more than make up for this paperwork nightmare.

Classified
06-11-2009, 11:39 PM
That's right dump em all so I can pick them up! You win some and you lose some. Bid to make your money and if they say no then move on to the next. If they want a lower a price and you can still make money at it then agree to it on a 3 year contract.
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ryde307
06-11-2009, 11:50 PM
I'd like to think if most LCO's said the heck with these commercial properties' over-the-top paperwork requirements and didn't bid them, they would loosen up. Let em starve. I know they want to cover their rears, but what is outlined above is just ridiculous. Again, no way I am letting someone tell me how much I will get paid for a job when I own the LCO.

steven - why don't you dump this one and go bid some small businesses and nice resi's. You will more than make up for this paperwork nightmare.

They aren't telling him what he will get paid that is why he is bidding on it. So they can look at the bids and pick which one they want. This is all very standard for commercial work. Alot of the contracts are to fill paper. You come up with your prices for every service they want covered take the total and divide it by whatever they are looking for. As in a yearly, monthly (most likely), or weekely price. You have to be able to cover all the stuff in the contract though. Ex: mowing, trimming, shrub trimming, weed control and fert, plantings, mulch, all are pretty common.
They are saying you bill them because it's probably the managment company that is responsible for all those properties. Or it's the corprate office who does the payroll.
Don't be scared or run away just take it slow read over it and if you don't get it have someone who is a little more experianced help you out.
Goodluck

DA Quality Lawn & YS
06-12-2009, 12:29 AM
maybe i misread the op. I took it as the bid paperwork had an amount filled in the blank as the amount they would pay per cut. Sorry about that if that is not the way it is.

Classified - you have your biz model I have mine and the guy in the town next door has his. Lets leave it at that.

Classified
06-12-2009, 05:55 AM
maybe i misread the op. I took it as the bid paperwork had an amount filled in the blank as the amount they would pay per cut. Sorry about that if that is not the way it is.

Classified - you have your biz model I have mine and the guy in the town next door has his. Lets leave it at that.


It's called commercial. It's just the way you have to play if you want the big stuff.
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Roger
06-12-2009, 06:34 AM
....

Finally, why do you want to sign THEIR contract? Who knows what's in there. They should be the ones entering into YOUR agreement.

....


He knows what is in the agreement. He has it in front of him to read.

If there is nothing toxic in the agreement, why should he ask the company sign HIS agreement? Why would the company deal with a contractor who brings something new to the transaction, requiring their legal department review another agreement?

These companies undoubtedly enter into agreements with many, many contractors. They would be foolish to have a different agreement with every contractor, hence their requirement of having their own agreement.

What's the big deal about signing their agreement if the T & Cs are acceptable? Perhaps their T & Cs are even better than yours. Why discard the idea out-of-hand? If you are not able to negotiate through these kinds of agreements, then this is not a piece of business you should be seeking.

djagusch
06-12-2009, 08:45 AM
I would read it carefully and bid it out. If you have questions go ask the contact person.

As for using their contract. I have my own and also have used others. When you get another companies contract it's good to look through and get ideas for your own contract.