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View Full Version : Honeysuckle Removal in woods


Gravely76
07-01-2009, 10:25 PM
I am trying to find an efficient way to remove a large number of honey suckle plants from the woods on family farm in southwest Ohio.

We have used a Stihl FS90 with metal blade and am thinking of using a 2 wheel Gravely with circular saw attachment on the front.

LawnScapers of Dayton
07-01-2009, 10:27 PM
you have to get the roots or it will be back in no time

GravelyNut
07-01-2009, 11:32 PM
Roundup ( or equal ) on the sprouts that come back up.

kirk1701
07-02-2009, 06:10 PM
And to think, you guys are trying to kill them and I got 8 of them planted on the fence row hoping to make a privacy fence out of um :laugh:

My hope is to engineer something ontop of the fence for them to climb up say 10 feet.

zoning laws say you can't have a fence higher then 6 feet, we'll OK, fence is 4' and the other 6' is a plant :cool2:

Think Green
07-02-2009, 08:53 PM
Gravely,
To get rid of the stuff, you can use round-up but it is hard to kill the entire root clump.
Try using a Triclopyr product.

Kirk,
I understand your plight of a privacy problem. The only thing to think about is over the years, Lonicera will crumble any oak fence and is even more devastating to a chain link fence. The vines will deteriorate the wood and the chain link will corrode with the acids in the plant. It is a lose-lose situation...!

Whitey4
07-02-2009, 11:03 PM
Honeysuckle is so invasive, it is on the table in the NYS senate as a candidate for a new "do not sell" law that will be on the books soon.

Think Green
07-03-2009, 06:08 PM
Whitey,
I like that law...................Honeysucke grows wild here as the birds don't help with the scattering of the material in nests. It just takes a node to make this stuff spread to the next lawn.
My wife wants me to buy some and plant it on our Arbor's.........instead I bought Jasmine! She can get over it!!!!!!

naughty62
07-04-2009, 06:53 AM
cut honeysuckles and wipe with tordon rtu .dont get heavy handed with the stuff ,it is very water soluable. apply asap ,do not wait all day to apply .

GravelyNut
07-04-2009, 10:12 PM
Whitey,
I like that law...................Honeysucke grows wild here as the birds don't help with the scattering of the material in nests. It just takes a node to make this stuff spread to the next lawn.
My wife wants me to buy some and plant it on our Arbor's.........instead I bought Jasmine! She can get over it!!!!!!
Jasmine down here is an invasive.

JB1
07-04-2009, 10:32 PM
don't laugh but get some goats, they will clean it up in no time.

beegreenlandcare
07-05-2009, 12:01 PM
Here in WI Honeysuckle is also classified as an "invasive species". It is amajor problem in our state. State Parks generally get volunteers together and wage all out wars on removal of the plant from their areas.:dizzy:

grasswhacker
07-05-2009, 02:27 PM
http://www.misterhoneysuckle.com/pages/content/benefits.html

Think Green
07-05-2009, 05:11 PM
Honeysuckle is a beautiful vine and has a purpose, I am sure as Cudzu!!?
However, I don't like either, just as people don't like crabgrass but makes a beautiful lawn if kept up. Bees are an important role in the cross-pollination process and flowering plants--vines--annuals--perennials are very important to the planet and it is necessary.
If a particular species of anything becomes over rampid and invades areas where structural issues and human safety become a need for remedy. Selective areas need to be protected from encroaching species of plants.
The bottom line is when a species of plant starts to cause man money, it needs to be exterminated?????! If often left up to nature, the vine will selectively place itself where it is needed. Nature will survive and reproduce vegetation to correct the balance.!
The balance may be where we don't want it, but who are we to tell nature so????

kirk1701
07-06-2009, 05:28 PM
My lovely Honeysuckles in early spring. Now, the hummingbirds keep them full :)

beegreenlandcare
07-06-2009, 06:34 PM
Well, the problem w/ that theory is that honeysuckle (at least the species I'm talking about) IS NOT native to this area and is "invading" and dominating many of our native species. To us honeysuckle is in the same category as emerald ash borer and gypsy moth.

RedSquareLandscaping
07-06-2009, 10:51 PM
A good weed spray or a goat from the zoo will do the trick.