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kirk1701
07-09-2009, 12:58 PM
Hey all,
I'm going here in a few hours to pick up my grub control app for this year. Queastion to you all is what brand you recomend?

I posted this in my last thread but hasn't got much traffic probably due to the other issue being resolved so..someone did say Merit but I can't find it on Lesco's site.

JDUtah
07-09-2009, 01:50 PM
Personally the first grub control I think you need is an automated sprinkler system.

Just my .02 :)

kirk1701
07-09-2009, 02:13 PM
Personally the first grub control I think you need is an automated sprinkler system.

Just my .02 :)

JD have I offended you in some way? just asking as your reply is blunt but...

Anyhow as for the sprinklers, you need to understand where I'm at, not a house in 20 miles of me have underground sprinklers, hell host homes around me don't even have a lawn they have crabgrass and johnson grass lawns.

Just my .02 :dancing:

cpa4t9r
07-09-2009, 02:59 PM
I did the same thing a few weeks back. Consensus was Merit. Mach 2 was less positive feedback but that seems to have changed since the label (I think) now permits higher app rates. Merit (generic) is what I used based on my searches. Just going off the top of my head, but don't think you can go wrong if you choose Merit.

JDUtah
07-09-2009, 03:11 PM
JD have I offended you in some way? just asking as your reply is blunt but...

Anyhow as for the sprinklers, you need to understand where I'm at, not a house in 20 miles of me have underground sprinklers, hell host homes around me don't even have a lawn they have crabgrass and johnson grass lawns.

Just my .02 :dancing:

Sorry, I didn't mean to be so straight up. I'm not offended at all. I'm just a blunt guy.

That's awesome you are leading your area in turf aesthetics. My personal opinion is you wouldn't need to put so much effort into what chemicals when, etc... if you had an automated irrigation system. Less drought stress = more insect and disease resistant turf.

Sure you might be learning how to "do things right" in this forum, but sometimes I wonder if you are learning to do "the right things". In other words, doing teh right things is important than doing the wrong things the right way. IMO the first thing you should do is get irrigation in. Then, only after that, should you worry about chemicals.

You inferred yourself that you were one of the leaders in your area, why not lead them to a very important part of lawn care... irrigation (at least in my area).

Peace out. :drinkup:

VARMIT COMMISSION
07-09-2009, 03:14 PM
I found some gereric merit this year named MALICE wsp. It cost me $51.00 an acre. Much cheaper than name brand Merit. Generics are the way to go.

kirk1701
07-09-2009, 05:16 PM
Sorry, I didn't mean to be so straight up. I'm not offended at all. I'm just a blunt guy.

That's awesome you are leading your area in turf aesthetics. My personal opinion is you wouldn't need to put so much effort into what chemicals when, etc... if you had an automated irrigation system. Less drought stress = more insect and disease resistant turf.

Sure you might be learning how to "do things right" in this forum, but sometimes I wonder if you are learning to do "the right things". In other words, doing teh right things is important than doing the wrong things the right way. IMO the first thing you should do is get irrigation in. Then, only after that, should you worry about chemicals.

You inferred yourself that you were one of the leaders in your area, why not lead them to a very important part of lawn care... irrigation (at least in my area).

Peace out. :drinkup:
I wouldn't say one of the leaders :drinkup: but definitely one of the best looking in my neighborhood. I have one issue, no shade and because of that the front lawn suffers but I got three dogwoods across the front so give it time :cool2:

Now don't get me wrong, there are some $300K sub divisions up the street from me with beautiful lawns however this time of year they are ALL BROWN I kid you not (unless we get rain like we have this year) because no irrigation.

Tell yu the truth, I've only seen a couple of places here with irrigation so I'm being honest when I say I'd probably be laughed at by all the neighbors taking it that far to put irrigation in, especially with city water and like last year we were in a drought and could not water but every other day that was mandatory.

As for doing it right, yea I'm learning as I just got back from Southern States EMPTY HANDED! after 1. being told I had to put the grub control down every three months and 2. being told rather then putting a pre-emergent down now I should get something (herbicide) to spray and it just now hit 90 degrees today so you guys also warned me about spraying above 90 :drinkup:

So yea, you input helped, last year at this time I would have walked out of southern states with $140 in grub control and killed the lawn spraying a herbicide :) which then would have been better off taking the $140 and stocking up on beer :laugh:

I found some gereric merit this year named MALICE wsp. It cost me $51.00 an acre. Much cheaper than name brand Merit. Generics are the way to go.

Sounds like what Lesco quoted me this morning; was $51 and under the name of Bandit which I was told was the same as Merit. Thing is, they are not close to me and would have to ship and UPS gets a bit expensive shipping 30 Lb bags :dizzy:

kirk1701
07-09-2009, 06:52 PM
Think I found what I need guys :clapping:

As someone else once said here there is a seach feature.

Found this:
http://www.lawnsite.com/showthread.php?t=274480&highlight=Grub+Control
Timing is critical in any grub control program. Grub EX contains Imidicloprid ( Merit) . It is designed to work as a preventative application. Apply to early and the insecticide will not be there when the grubs hatch. Apply to late and the insecticide will not have a chance to disperse into the grass plants or root system. The product has no curative or immediate knockdown capabilities so you have to time it well before egg hatch for it to work. If you need to kill grubs that are already there try triclorifon ( Dylox) for immediate kill. You should contact your local extension office for proper timing in your location.
Grub Ex it is than. :drinkup:

Also called the extension office as mentioned earlier in the thread and got some very imforitive links; thought I'd share.
This will help me all year
http://www.ca.uky.edu/agc/PUBS/agr/agr55/agr55.pdf

http://www.ca.uky.edu/agc/pubs/ent/ent10/ent10.htm

VARMIT COMMISSION
07-09-2009, 07:43 PM
Sounds like what Lesco quoted me this morning; was $51 and under the name of Bandit which I was told was the same as Merit. Thing is, they are not close to me and would have to ship and UPS gets a bit expensive shipping 30 Lb bags :dizzy:[/QUOTE]



Actually it came in a packet of 4 1.6 oz ws bags. Or 4 1.6oz bags per acre.

Runner
07-09-2009, 07:54 PM
Yep. GrubEx contains Imidicloprid, which s the active ingredient to kill the larvae in the infant stages as they hatch, once it is rinsed down into the soil and taken up by the plants. Incidentally,...there are much more economic choices of this same product, rather than the beautiful, gorgeous colorful bags that cotts comes in.

EVM
07-09-2009, 09:41 PM
You should get 0-0-7 with Allectus, Lesco carries it.

ICT Bill
07-09-2009, 09:50 PM
Personally the first grub control I think you need is an automated sprinkler system.

Just my .02 :)

Hey JD
Where he lives very few people have irrigation, he probaly gets over 40 inches of rain a year. This spring he probably got that in one month

i should bug out, I don't know the background of the irrigation comment

Where you live you probably get 11 in a good year

Think Green
07-09-2009, 11:42 PM
JD,
After all, 50% of our customers have irrigation systems and we have grub worm trouble and it goes with mole issues. So you are telling me that grubs are more prolific in dry soils than in the moist soils.??
I look at it like this................when I am out hunting in the woods, where it is moist and shady, you can uncover any area of leaf cover or wood cover and find all sort of grubworms. Now if a lawn is dry, would you find grubworms?
I tend to follow the mole issues to find the grubworms!.......It isn't in the dry lawns!!

Maybe, I misunderstood the response you gave or maybe there is another plan behind the response????!!!!

kirk1701
07-10-2009, 12:30 AM
Yep. GrubEx contains Imidicloprid, which s the active ingredient to kill the larvae in the infant stages as they hatch, once it is rinsed down into the soil and taken up by the plants. Incidentally,...there are much more economic choices of this same product, rather than the beautiful, gorgeous colorful bags that cotts comes in.
Those more economical choices is what I'm looking for, but I seem to be left with no alternatives

Hey JD
Where he lives very few people have irrigation, he probably gets over 40 inches of rain a year. This spring he probably got that in one month

i should bug out, I don't know the background of the irrigation comment

Where you live you probably get 11 in a good year

Thanks for the help ICT, actually this irrigation subject came up from this thread (http://www.lawnsite.com/showthread.php?t=280762). However after all was said and done what looked to be drought/stressed lawn was actually my spot spraying 2,4-D for weeds in temps approaching 90. Then, got hotter hit 95 and two weeks of dry weather. I don't think JD or some others bothered to read the last page of the thread after it got long and dragged out.

More rain on the way this weekend which I was planning/hopping to have the grub control down ahead of that rain. Plus, looks like rain everyday next week :laugh: But I need irrigation (knocks on wood) I'm not complaining, never knock on the good lords gifts from above :)

Thanks Think Green for your comments as well.

tlg
07-10-2009, 01:09 AM
Sorry, I didn't mean to be so straight up. I'm not offended at all. I'm just a blunt guy.

That's awesome you are leading your area in turf aesthetics. My personal opinion is you wouldn't need to put so much effort into what chemicals when, etc... if you had an automated irrigation system. Less drought stress = more insect and disease resistant turf.

Sure you might be learning how to "do things right" in this forum, but sometimes I wonder if you are learning to do "the right things". In other words, doing teh right things is important than doing the wrong things the right way. IMO the first thing you should do is get irrigation in. Then, only after that, should you worry about chemicals.

You inferred yourself that you were one of the leaders in your area, why not lead them to a very important part of lawn care... irrigation (at least in my area).

Peace out. :drinkup:

Contrary to popular belief adult grub beatles tend to seek out irrriagted turf because the eggs need moisture to survive. One of the worst grub infestations I ever saw was on a lawn that was watered on a regular basis. Granted, the damage may be lessened due to the grass being watered but in no way will the potential for high grub populations be less because of irriagation. Any good grub prevention program will need both a insecticide like Merit and a sound watering program. Of course the worst damge from grubs will be on lawns that don't get watered.

JDUtah
07-10-2009, 01:45 AM
I have seen time and time again that lawns with irregular watering patterns are much more likely to have grub problems that cause serious damage to the turf. In other words, grub pressure that passes the tolerable threshold. I am not here saying over watered or completely dry soil are where grubs like to munch and lay eggs... but I am saying irregularly watered lawns seem to be more visually affected by grubs.

Bill, perhaps the need for irrigation is minimal in that area. Some past pics have made me suspect Kirk's lawn has had irregular watering similar to lawns I have observed with irregular grub (billbug) pressure.

Sure grubs, sod webworms, etc need water to live and reproduce... every living creature does... In my local experience lawns with regular and appropriate watering schedules show minimal grub damage.

JDUtah
07-10-2009, 01:49 AM
Contrary to popular belief adult grub beatles tend to seek out irrriagted turf because the eggs need moisture to survive. One of the worst grub infestations I ever saw was on a lawn that was watered on a regular basis. Granted, the damage may be lessened due to the grass being watered but in no way will the potential for high grub populations be less because of irriagation. Any good grub prevention program will need both a insecticide like Merit and a sound watering program. Of course the worst damge from grubs will be on lawns that don't get watered.

Well said. I agree with most of it. Although I do admit I have a hard time with anticipatory applications.

kirk1701
07-10-2009, 08:54 AM
Well said. I agree with most of it. Although I do admit I have a hard time with anticipatory applications.

And in a way I guess that's what I'm doing. Never had a grub problem in the past, I guess the dam moles keep um under control :laugh:

Hmmmm, Moles Vs Grub....:clapping:

In all honesty like I said, never had a problem but preventive maintenance didn't hurt.

I'm going this morning to pick up the grub ex as it looks like I have no other alternative.

kirk1701
07-10-2009, 08:58 AM
Have one last question but not related to the grub.

As I said on page 1 I walked out of SS empty handed after being told putting down a Pre-em now would not help me.

This true? Keep in mind I have an electrical line running smack dab right down the center of the front lawn and birds seem to hibernate on it and use it for an out house :hammerhead:

foreplease
07-10-2009, 09:01 AM
Keep the grass under the electric lines healthy and full and you will not have a problem with weeds established from bird droppings.

kirk1701
07-10-2009, 09:22 AM
Keep the grass under the electric lines healthy and full and you will not have a problem with weeds established from bird droppings.

Thats the plan for next year (as it was this year also) till I sprayed the 2,4-D too late in the spring which caused the what looked like "Stress due to summer" :laugh:

Late Sept the plan is too aerate, powerseed over top of that and put down compost. Till then I want to minimize the weeds so I don't have to kill the whole thing off. "OR" is it too late to put down a Pre-m and come sept my grass seed won't germinate?

My last Picture (http://www.lawnsite.com/showpost.php?p=3082339&postcount=39) don't look all that bad so I want to keep it this way.

foreplease
07-10-2009, 10:05 AM
Other than grub control, my advice is no more chemicals, but you are wont to do what you want to do :)

kirk1701
07-10-2009, 10:23 AM
Other than grub control, my advice is no more chemicals, but you are wont to do what you want to do :)

No me really learning foreplease trust me, sometimes the hard way but none the less learning :drinkup:

No more chemicals it is, this time I'll listen :walking:

kirk1701
07-10-2009, 04:13 PM
By the way guys/ladies

I looked to rent an aerator last year and the best I could come up with was..lets put it this way it looked like a combine :laugh:

Which is why this did not get done last year and just powerseeded so before I go calling around, looking for pricing locally I'd like to give you all the opportunity first.

Anyone in Kentucky and I know there are a few on here from Bowling Green who want to take a look and give me a price on aerating the lawn for me you got first shots :drinkup:

bx24
07-11-2009, 08:41 PM
I found some gereric merit this year named MALICE wsp. It cost me $51.00 an acre. Much cheaper than name brand Merit. Generics are the way to go.

ya, and try to find it

GravelyGuy
07-11-2009, 09:43 PM
I found some gereric merit this year named MALICE wsp. It cost me $51.00 an acre. Much cheaper than name brand Merit. Generics are the way to go.

What rate were you putting it down? I think I was qouted like $37.50 per bag for that stuff.

RigglePLC
07-11-2009, 10:10 PM
Kirk, Here is the link for Mallet Insecticide, (imidicloprid)--generic.
http://www.nufarm.com/USTO/Malletr2F

Also, consider new Arena insecticide (clothianidan). It is by Valent--preventative and curative for grubs, and many other insects.
http://www.valentpro.com/professional/products/arena/loader.cfm?csModule=security/getfile&pageid=38705

Some of us do use Trimec and Threeway in hot weather. Use the correct amount. I also suggest using a second application of Trimec in the fall when temps come down to about 70. It is for winter annuals and dandelions that have sprouted in the cool rainy weather of fall. Otherwise--problems in the spring.

kirk1701
07-11-2009, 10:28 PM
Thanks guys,
Bookmarked the link above for next year as I done got the grub-ex and put it out today. I was going to wait on putting it out but I seen what I assume to be "baby grub" or just hatched larva whatever you call it.

Seen some mole traffic so put out one of the traps which requires some digging into the mole run and YEP, little white looking things curled up just like mature grub so I went ahead and put it out ahead of the rain we are suppose to get the next couple a days.

RigglePLC would Trimec not be something you need to be licenced to purchase?

@foreplease:
I know I said no more Chemicals :laugh:
Had to put one more down. Substituted 2 bags of Ortho Insect killer for lawns in place of what Scott's summer Riser would do, just without the nitrogen. :walking:

Keep in mind guys; those of you in Kentucky who want to take a look and give me a price on aerating the lawn for me you got first shots this fall.

RigglePLC
07-11-2009, 11:30 PM
Weed B Gone has improved their formula--it is now about the same as Trimec. Weed B Gone Max is even better.

foreplease
07-11-2009, 11:56 PM
Thanks guys,
@foreplease:
I know I said no more Chemicals :laugh:
Had to put one more down. Substituted 2 bags of Ortho Insect killer for lawns in place of what Scott's summer Riser would do, just without the nitrogen. :walking:


Noted. Ha ha.

kirk1701
07-12-2009, 12:08 AM
Weed B Gone has improved their formula--it is now about the same as Trimec. Weed B Gone Max is even better.

I might have to take a look at that. The weed b Gone I have seen here contains 3.8% 2,4-D and last year it was 7%

Which was why I wasn't having any results this year.

VARMIT COMMISSION
07-12-2009, 12:25 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by VARMIT COMMISSION
I found some gereric merit this year named MALICE wsp. It cost me $51.00 an acre. Much cheaper than name brand Merit. Generics are the way to go.

What rate were you putting it down? I think I was qouted like $37.50 per bag for that stuff.

I will walk out to the shop in the AM to verify but-- I think it is 1.6oz./11,000 square foot. Four 1.6oz. packets per bag. One bag per acre.

JDUtah
07-12-2009, 01:38 AM
How long were the little white guys? You might be dealing with bilbug not grub. Sometimes the grub stuff doesn't knockout bilbug and visversa

kirk1701
07-12-2009, 01:51 AM
How long were the little white guys? You might be dealing with bilbug not grub. Sometimes the grub stuff doesn't knockout bilbug and visversa

I'd say about 1/4".

Kinds sure thats why the mole started digging through there. Guess I'll know in the morning when his little tale is in the trap :laugh:

kirk1701
07-13-2009, 11:23 AM
Boy I couldn't have timed the weather any better guys. :walking:

Got the remaining grub control and Ortho bug b gon out yesterday (Ran short) and yesterday about 5 PM here comes this massive storm, another 3/4" of rain from 5 til about midnight. :)

dishboy
07-13-2009, 01:08 PM
I have seen time and time again that lawns with irregular watering patterns are much more likely to have grub problems that cause serious damage to the turf. In other words, grub pressure that passes the tolerable threshold. I am not here saying over watered or completely dry soil are where grubs like to munch and lay eggs... but I am saying irregularly watered lawns seem to be more visually affected by grubs.

Bill, perhaps the need for irrigation is minimal in that area. Some past pics have made me suspect Kirk's lawn has had irregular watering similar to lawns I have observed with irregular grub (billbug) pressure.

Sure grubs, sod webworms, etc need water to live and reproduce... every living creature does... In my local experience lawns with regular and appropriate watering schedules show minimal grub damage.

Billbugs will munch any variety of grass they like , irrigated or not. Most homeowners with irrigation systems usually just amp up the water to comphensate for the insect pressure thus damage appears less severe. Unfortunitly this method of managerment creates other issues that affect turf quality in a negative manner. I would rather see a metered amount of water go down and when turf declines find the source of the problem rather than turning that water on every day or something similar. People are idiots!

kirk1701
08-01-2009, 09:43 AM
Other than grub control, my advice is no more chemicals, but you are wont to do what you want to do :)

foreplease I need your advice AGAIN!!! :drinkup:

This thread don't seem like it was so long ago however didn't expect a record rainfall for the month of July to be broken either???

YEP. And looks like the trend is going to continue into August as well. My lawn looks great, thick and mowing twice a week to keep up with the 1/3rd rule but at the same time I'm starting to see a yellow tint. Not as green as some lawns and almost looks striped.

Your guys are going to kill me but I purchased two bags of Scotts fert yesterday and plan is to get it out tomorrow (Sunday) after this next expected rain.

Am I fixing to screw up a good thing?

Since I already put down Ortho Insect killer for lawns in place of what Scott's summer guard I purchased two bags of "Scotts Turf Builder With PLUS 2 Weed Control" to get out tomorrow. Have a 24 hour window after this next rain? :confused:

RigglePLC
08-01-2009, 10:22 AM
If you are mowing twice per week--why add more fertilizer? If you have weeds go with Weed B Gone.

If the color is yellow--you may have rust disease.
http://plantclinic.cornell.edu/FactSheets/turfrust/rust.htm

On the other hand--sometimes during warm wet conditions unusual things happen.

kirk1701
08-01-2009, 11:49 AM
If you are mowing twice per week--why add more fertilizer? If you have weeds go with Weed B Gone.

If the color is yellow--you may have rust disease.
http://plantclinic.cornell.edu/FactSheets/turfrust/rust.htm

On the other hand--sometimes during warm wet conditions unusual things happen.

I'm actually mowing twice a week because it might be the last chance I have before the next storm comes in :laugh:

So, usually taking off about an inch at a time but with the amount of rain we've had my thoughts were the fert just washed through. Think it was Mid June I put a light 10X10X10 out being cautious and assuming hot weather. Which I was right, turned off hot and humid for a 2 week spell then POOF. Been raining ever since. Before the 10X10X10 it was March when the lawn got its last dose of any fert.

Reading the back of the bag, this stuff is slow release.

kirk1701
08-01-2009, 11:20 PM
I saved this for you guys; Riggle this make more sense now :laugh:

I'm still not complaining about the rain, I love it :cool2:

Welcome to August! We'll start the month with below average temperatures, but already looking to add the rainfall to the almanac as soon as tonight. Aside from an isolated shower or two, today will be mainly dry and partly sunny, with highs in the mid-80s. By this evening however, clouds increase with chances for showers and storms developing ahead of an approaching cold front. No widespread severe weather is anticipated at this time. However, some storms may produce heavy rain through early Sunday, before chances begin to diminish. Dry weather returns for Monday, but much of next week looks active, with daily chances for scattered showers and storms, and temperatures in the mid-to-upper 80s. Have a great day!


So plan is to put out the fert in the morning after this rain but before the grass gets dry :drinkup:

This is funny
http://gray.ftp.clickability.com/wbkowebftp/NewExtended.JPG

By the way. No rust but I have seen the black mold you guys have been talking about on here. One spot in the lawn last mowing, black dust.

foreplease
08-02-2009, 07:55 AM
foreplease I need your advice AGAIN!!!

Consider it given.

kirk1701
08-02-2009, 05:02 PM
Consider it given.

So I take it you disaprove of the fert?

foreplease
08-02-2009, 10:03 PM
So I take it you disaprove of the fert?
I wouldn't know about it or have an opinion if I weren't still subscribed to this thread. On top of that, you specifically asked...otherwise, probably still no opinion. I was trying to keep my answer light/playful.

Honestly, I do not claim to be the best person here to ask. From here I can't tell where I think your yard stands on fertilization needs. It sounds as if the color and density are still good and that it is growing well - who knows if it is from the rain or some other application you made. What I don't like at all is broadleaf weed control the first week in August. It could dry up and get hotter than blazes in Kentucky again tomorrow. Are you having a big weed problem other than under the wire where the birds sit?

On another front, you're applying lime and now considering ammoniacal nitrogen that could take your pH in the opposite direction. Your yard looks good; I am more concerned about your well water.

kirk1701
08-03-2009, 10:24 AM
I wouldn't know about it or have an opinion if I weren't still subscribed to this thread. On top of that, you specifically asked...otherwise, probably still no opinion. I was trying to keep my answer light/playful.

Honestly, I do not claim to be the best person here to ask. From here I can't tell where I think your yard stands on fertilization needs. It sounds as if the color and density are still good and that it is growing well - who knows if it is from the rain or some other application you made. What I don't like at all is broadleaf weed control the first week in August. It could dry up and get hotter than blazes in Kentucky again tomorrow. Are you having a big weed problem other than under the wire where the birds sit?

On another front, you're applying lime and now considering ammoniacal nitrogen that could take your pH in the opposite direction. Your yard looks good; I am more concerned about your well water.

I agree FP, and yea it could dry up and get hot as a firecracker here so guess you could say "I'm playing the weather" going off of the previous two months weather pattern and thats taking one hell of a chance :usflag:

But that's me, I'm always taking chances like this and goes well beyond lawn and garden I love the stock market as well :laugh: However thats another story but if you like tips, look at RIMM :drinkup:

Back on topic you got me confused with something; Lime I thought allowed your nitrogen to be absorbed better no? You say it could take the pH in the opposite direction? I'm confused?

No well water here; all city water.

Thanks for the complements on the yard, I guess I make it more work for myself then it needs to be but hey; I enjoy it so. :)

kirk1701
08-08-2009, 10:02 AM
Just thought I'd post an update for you all on the results after the fert application.

In my opinion, I wouldn't repeat this app next year. Now don't get me wrong, lawn still looks great, hasn't burned up and everything went as panned. Put out last Sunday Morning Aug 2 and 48 hours later which was recommended by label we got a good soaking rain. North of me got floods, Lexington, KY had a whole college under water and here we got downpour's but also rained all night and into Wednesday morning. :drinkup:

Now I think if it was not for that rain, lawn would look like a barren dessert strip so I'm counting my blessings.

As you can see from the pic above, you wouldn't notice it unless you were looking for it so you can see the overlaps :laugh: Can still see the overlaps but its slowly "growing" away. I broke down, purchased a new spreader however when I used it to apply this app I didn't take into consideration the width difference and applied as I would with my 20 year old spreader.

OH ME!!!
Live and learn, but still having fun guys :drinkup:

Going to wait on posting a pic till this evening after first day of 90+ degree temps. :dizzy:

kirk1701
08-09-2009, 06:11 PM
Here's an updated pic for you guys; opinions please.

It don't look as green but think thats due to the 92 degree temps and full sun for the last three days and I spent 4 hours watering today so the stripes are gone.

Will probably wait till Friday to Mow (depending on weather) and up the height of the mower to 4.25 for a couple a weeks.

As I said above, this app will not be repeated next year but now I think I also have a half decent schedule to follow for next year also based on what mistakes I did this year (which were two minor ones) and both included Nitrogen. :)