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drobin
07-12-2009, 05:59 PM
A customer wants me to come over and spray one small tree 14 feet tall for japanese beetles, what to use? and what to charge? what do you think?

93Chevy
07-12-2009, 06:03 PM
Are you licensed to spray pesticides?

olive123
07-12-2009, 08:48 PM
i would say a 75 minmum for one tree and sell up. "Since im spraying why not let me treat the rest of your trees and shrubs for X more."

phasthound
07-12-2009, 09:48 PM
A customer wants me to come over and spray one small tree 14 feet tall for japanese beetles, what to use? and what to charge? what do you think?

If you don't know what to spray for Jap beetles, you are probably not licensed and certainly not qualified to make this application. :nono:

Get trained & learn the law.

Think Green
07-12-2009, 10:09 PM
From what I have learned from the members on this forum, is that the state of New York is pretty stringent on its pesticides applications and laws.
What we spray in other parts of the country may not be in law for your jurisdiction or be suggested for use as restricted.

Trust me---spraying just one tree can be an easy feat........spray--collect--run!
If the tree dies, then all it will take is a call to the N.Y. State pesticide agencies, and mention a name of a company. They are like Arkansas, and will look you up on their files and come looking for you. If you carry a Federal number and or Tax I.D., you are found by phone or address. The State Tax people will come calling to go over the quarterly statements. Following these people are the State Pesticide Inspectors'. They are gentle with their rubber gloves and petrolium jellies, but those penalties hurt worse than anything.!!!! LOL?

You can google the name of the tree in qestion...........google the control of the Japanese Beetle and find out on line what to use!!!
Then comes the question of........can i use it here and where to get it!!!!????

drobin
07-12-2009, 10:34 PM
Thanks Olive 123,
I was thinking around those lines but it is always nice to get confirmation. Yes, I am licensed and it is my 1st year. I have been spending most of my time on turf but my license is for turf and ornamentals. To the rest of you- Soooorrrrry for asking! maybe that question was below you or points out my lack of knowledge but everyone has to start somewhere and 1 single inexpensive tree on a lawn I treat in my opinion is an ideal place to start.

93Chevy
07-12-2009, 10:37 PM
Good point. Sorry I was a Richard in my post, guy.

rcreech
07-12-2009, 10:41 PM
I use Bifen.

Depends on the drive time...but if close to home, I would do a tree like that for $40-50 and then charge $15-20 for each additional tree (depending on their size).

There is good money to be made in spraying Japs.

You can charge as much as you want or what ever your market will bear, but your cost will be very small!!!!!

JWTurfguy
07-12-2009, 10:53 PM
If they have Jap beetles in their trees, better make sure you sell a preventative round of grub control for the lawn. Don't just spray the tree.

drobin
07-12-2009, 11:22 PM
chevy no problem its all good, cant spray bifen till next year in NY, I need 1 full year 1st , yeah i tried selling for the grub prventitive but she want to go with a curative if there is turf damage, gues she wants to wait it out

greendoctor
07-13-2009, 04:52 AM
Alternative to bifenthrin is Sevin + Forbid or Avid. I normally do not spray mixes of insecticides, however spraying Sevin up a tree will cause mean spider mites if you do not take precautions. What I normally do for leaf feeding beetles is illegal in NY. Soil injection of Merit at 1.4 g per inch of trunk caliper.

RigglePLC
07-13-2009, 08:52 AM
Most insecticides will work. Sevin is a good choice. And DrGreen made a good point about mites. Also, it is common for the beetles to come back--they just fly in from the next yard--so you will probably have to spray 3 times at 10 day intervals. And--do you have the proper equipment? Is this a hand sprayer job? Backpack? Skid sprayer? Is there weed killer in the tank now?

foreplease
07-13-2009, 09:07 AM
True Value carries a product from Spectracide called Triazicide Once & Done Insect Killer. It works well and can be bought in small amounts at retail if you are just starting out. The materials cost for the job you describe is almost negligible using this product.

Riggle makes a good point: you need a different sprayer than you are using for herbicides. Damage from residual weed killer is a risk too great to take and the requirements of getting complete coverage on a tree are a lot different than low volume-low pressure coverage on turf.

Before spraying up into a tree I hope you plan to wear a respirator and other PPE.

drobin
07-13-2009, 09:20 AM
i was planning on tripple rinsing my herbicide back pack (Fastpac with jd 9 gun) and using that. will that sufice ?

foreplease
07-13-2009, 09:37 AM
It might but I would not count on it. Have you been following Whitey4's backpack sprayer problem? It's a wake up call for everyone who already did not have an alarm set.

Poor guy spent Saturday and Sunday filling a 10 yard dumpster with the old yard and is installing 4 pallets of new sod today. Link (http://www.lawnsite.com/showthread.php?t=280606)

I think spraying this one tree is a great way for you to get started as long as you know the risks. It will be easy to do and you will get immediate great results. It only takes a couple days for Japanses Beetles to defoliate a tree so if your customer is seeing them it's time to move on it.

Here in Michigan I follow the GDD Tracker web site (http://www.gddtracker.net/?model=11&offset=0&zip=48824&state=MI). It is a very reliable timing tool. Perhaps you can find something like it for your part of the country. Year after year I have seen the same pattern and have kind of a mental list of indicator plants in my area that I watch. They're one that seem to get hit first or are most attractive to the beetle. I spray them first and if I am behind I see the damage on them first, letting me know the feeding season is underway. In time, you will develop your own list or at least see the pattern from year to year.

turf hokie
07-13-2009, 03:57 PM
Alternative to bifenthrin is Sevin + Forbid or Avid. I normally do not spray mixes of insecticides, however spraying Sevin up a tree will cause mean spider mites if you do not take precautions. What I normally do for leaf feeding beetles is illegal in NY. Soil injection of Merit at 1.4 g per inch of trunk caliper.

Where did you find it to be illegal to soil drench or inject imidcloprid in NY?

greendoctor
07-13-2009, 05:23 PM
Its on the label. No soil injections of Merit allowed in NY. I suppose drenches can be done, however they are not a preferred method of application for plants in the landscape. I prefer not to leave a chemical residue on the soil surface.

Think Green
07-13-2009, 08:23 PM
Drobin,
No--I don't think my response was over my head at all!! Each state does have its restrictions on pesticides or herbicides... My state gives us documentation on such matters or I can go on line to my license holding fascility and search out restricted or banned chemicals in my state.. All restricted pesticides will need to be accounted for!!
Most of the things that I suggest may not be allowed in the state of N.Y. I am sorry for off posting, but I am just being safe!! When I took my exams for pesticides in the insecticide-Commercial division, the chemical section was vast and is always changing. This section along with the EPA and FIFRA guidelines were enforced. If we didn't know how to control certain insects on their questions........it was simple..........we failed the test!!!!! It is up to a licensed applicator to keep up with the changing market and follow the rules and regulations.
The label doesn't lie!!!!!!

phasthound
07-13-2009, 08:45 PM
:clapping::clapping:Drobin,
No--I don't think my response was over my head at all!! Each state does have its restrictions on pesticides or herbicides... My state gives us documentation on such matters or I can go on line to my license holding fascility and search out restricted or banned chemicals in my state.. All restricted pesticides will need to be accounted for!!
Most of the things that I suggest may not be allowed in the state of N.Y. I am sorry for off posting, but I am just being safe!! When I took my exams for pesticides in the insecticide-Commercial division, the chemical section was vast and is always changing. This section along with the EPA and FIFRA guidelines were enforced. If we didn't know how to control certain insects on their questions........it was simple..........we failed the test!!!!! It is up to a licensed applicator to keep up with the changing market and follow the rules and regulations.
The label doesn't lie!!!!!!

Excellent post!! :clapping:

americanlawn
07-13-2009, 08:54 PM
Two things that really annoy me from lawnsite members:

1) Are you licensed?

2) You are too young.

drobin -- Thanks for your fine post. My favorite insecticide is "Crosscheck plus" from LESCO (same as Talstar). (I sprayed 200 gallons of it today at the 10 ounce per 100 gallon rate today for bagworms), but I hope you have the right equipment in order to hit the target pest, cuz backpacks really suck for spraying trees. (I like the J-D9 gun though, IF you have enough spray pressure to completely cover the tree).

That small of tree: $25 if they're a current customer. (3 gallons of spray, plus 30 seconds of your time). It would take longer to reel in my hose as it would to spray the tree. :laugh:

Good luck buddy. :waving:

A customer wants me to come over and spray one small tree 14 feet tall for japanese beetles, what to use? and what to charge? what do you think?

RigglePLC
07-13-2009, 09:15 PM
See the thread from Whitey about how he rinsed his back pack and ended up killing 2000 sqft of turf. Most backpack sprayers have a pressure reserve chamber which cannot be cleaned out. Regular users can advise you about this.
You need a separate sprayer.

turf hokie
07-13-2009, 09:50 PM
Its on the label. No soil injections of Merit allowed in NY. I suppose drenches can be done, however they are not a preferred method of application for plants in the landscape. I prefer not to leave a chemical residue on the soil surface.

Greendoctor,

Your info is usually dead on. But the label reads no soil injections in Nassau or Suffolk counties NY. Not all of NY. matter of fact if it weren't for Whitey, I dont know if I would even consider those counties part of NY:hammerhead:

phasthound
07-13-2009, 10:22 PM
Greendoctor,

Your info is usually dead on. But the label reads no soil injections in Nassau or Suffolk counties NY. Not all of NY. matter of fact if it weren't for Whitey, I dont know if I would even consider those counties part of NY:hammerhead:

Yeah, the island & NYC should separate from upstate. Two different animals.

greendoctor
07-14-2009, 03:43 AM
Greendoctor,

Your info is usually dead on. But the label reads no soil injections in Nassau or Suffolk counties NY. Not all of NY. matter of fact if it weren't for Whitey, I dont know if I would even consider those counties part of NY:hammerhead:

So it is OK to soil inject in most other parts of NY. Talk about dangling the steak in front of a lion. It is new to me that only some districts ban something in a state. Here, if it is banned on my island, it is also illegal in the rest of the state. If I remember correctly, those are the same counties of NY that want to legislate lawn and ornamental applications out of existence with all kinds of crazy neighbor notification laws. Thank goodness in my area how simple it is. Neighbors are obligated to stay out of areas that I am treating at the time, I am obligated to minimize drift out of the target area. Other than that, there is no need for me to notify everyone within 1/4 mile of the lawn I am doing.

foreplease
07-14-2009, 06:42 AM
You are better off where you are, greendoctor, for many reasons – starting with snow.

The P battle (of N-P-K) is being fought and decided for us at the county level here. Sometimes we're seeing differences from township to township within counties. It looks as though no consensus based on facts that can be agreed upon is going to be reached on a state wide basis. That's not to say the people representing those of us who feel P, conscientiously applied, is okay will not line up like lemmings on the other side. Much like local watering restriction ordinances, the bodies making these restrictive "laws" do not have enforcement arms. So fines and tickets probably won't stick, but that doesn't mean if you are scared into paying one that they will not be pleased to keep it. The folks charged with enforcing our pesticide laws (Michigan Department of Agriculture) will not jump in until there is a state law restricting the use of P. And while that seems unfortunately imminent, you do not need to be licensed to apply fertilizers in the first place. Factor in that Michigan farming has and relies upon a good and close working relationship with MDA and that offsite movement of P can be attributed much more to farms than turf and who, exactly, is going to enforce a law restricting the use of P? A ban on the sale of it is where I see it headed with possible exemptions for soil test results demonstrating a need. I could be all wet, but this is how it looks to me right now. Very overreaching.

turf hokie
07-14-2009, 07:31 AM
I am pretty sure those counties wont let you use Dithiopyr either,

Don't get me started on how much crap those counties have started. We are having the same issues as foreplease with the P as well as fert applications.

Westchester county (one removed from Nassau and Suffolk next to us) has enacted a bill that will go into effect Jan. 2011 that bans all P unless a soil test shows the need or you just seeded a lawn. That bill does not exempt organics:hammerhead: The bill also forbids ALL fertilizer appls from December 1 to April 1.