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View Full Version : Tree climbing training, ie.. rigging, traversing, rope work.


Lite4
07-15-2009, 05:08 PM
Can anyone recomend a good training manual or video series they have used to learn tree climbing and rigging? I want to be able to do high tree work with ropes and rigging where ladders can't go and I can place my lights high in the upper canopies. I know Ned has done some of this. Looking for suggestions and input.

Thanks guys,

Mark B
07-15-2009, 05:28 PM
I would look at some of the trees supply places. There is one that is close by called sherriel (not sure about the spelling) Brandon might know of the company I am talking about. But they sell the tree spikes, ropes, saws, all that stuff.

I like the idea of being able to do that as well.

Mike M
07-15-2009, 05:42 PM
Tim,

I did some research on this last year. Technical tree-climbing is now a sport, like climbing, and there are places you can go for classes, materials, etc. Sleepy is right, google arborist supplies for the gear & some basic books.

Also, James has done some of this, too.

I know there are classes in GA, not sure how far you would have to travel. This would be fun as a recreation, too. They even make hammocks you can sleep in, etc.

The Lighting Geek
07-15-2009, 07:34 PM
Tim, check out New Tribe online. I bought my pro gear saddle, carabiners, rope, etc from them. They have an excellent video about beginning rope work and climbing. There is also some info for recreational climbing which is different from the requirements you must adhere to for safety. Call me if you want more info!

Mark B
07-15-2009, 08:46 PM
Hey Tommy, how hard was it for to learn how to do that? Did you watch the video then go out and do it? I guess what I am asking what kind of learning curve did you have?

BrandonV
07-15-2009, 08:49 PM
I would look at some of the trees supply places. There is one that is close by called sherriel (not sure about the spelling) Brandon might know of the company I am talking about. But they sell the tree spikes, ropes, saws, all that stuff.

I like the idea of being able to do that as well.

http://www.sherrilltree.com/

INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting
07-15-2009, 11:25 PM
Tim. I would be contacting your local "Green Association" or arborist supply house and getting signed up for a training program before you buy anything! There is a lot to learn about technique and rigging (static line, dynamic line, fall arrest, rigging, etc etc) before you venture forth with spending money. The equipment needed is not cheap and will depend a lot on the type of work, heights, etc that you want to do.

Regards

Lite4
07-17-2009, 01:33 PM
Great info thanks, I will check out the ones you suggested. My biggest fear is being 40' up hanging from a limb and having a knot slip loose because I didn't tie it the right way or my rigging was done wrong. It pays to be trained the right way when you life is literally hanging by a strand!

44DCNF
07-17-2009, 02:25 PM
Here's a book on it. On Rope (http://www.amazon.com/Rope-American-Vertical-Techniques-Rappellers/dp/1879961059#reader).

David Gretzmier
07-18-2009, 01:36 AM
be careful, and be honest with your insurance carrier on tree work. The workmans comp rates I heard on tree work is outrageous. anything over 8 foot is high, over 40 foot is insanely expensive. guess which profession has some of the highest injury, death ? tree guys. If my client needs a light higher than a ladder will reach, then they need another light guy.

Az Gardener
07-18-2009, 01:57 AM
be careful, and be honest with your insurance carrier on tree work. The workmans comp rates I heard on tree work is outrageous. anything over 8 foot is high, over 40 foot is insanely expensive. guess which profession has some of the highest injury, death ? tree guys. If my client needs a light higher than a ladder will reach, then they need another light guy.

Its not the climbing that causes rates to go through the roof its the chippers. I asked my ins carrier where the breaking point was for height. How high can we go with our current insurance? They said how high do you go? I said as high as you will give me permission to with my current coverage :rolleyes: They asked if I owned a chipper I said no and they just told me to stay safe and not push it. I read my limits and liabilities book cover to cover it does not outline a specific height.

Go to the pacific N/W and spend a summer with Bartlett or Davey and you will be set. I know a guy here with a good tree company maybe you could come out this winter and work for him. No lights going up in Indy over the winter anyway.

David Gretzmier
07-18-2009, 03:35 AM
Our carrier is columbia. they were very specific about height of trees and ladders because we are under the outdoor electrician category. since they install light poles, and work on roofs, there were several questions about roof height, ladder height, and Christmas lights falls under that category. when the tree stuff came up, our rates double at 8 foot, doubles again at 30, and 40 foot, and go up by a factor of 9 at 40 feet plus. I shopped insurance. and when you ask, they'll tell you, anything over 40 foot climbing in a tree is extremely risky. we did a tree this week with Christmas lights, used a 26 foot scissor lift, put an 8 foot step ladder in it to get to the 3/4 point on the tree. ask anyone how tall that tree is, and they'll say it is 60 foot tall. but it is really only probably 45. I see no need to downlight from any higher than 30 foot. what effect you may achieve , it is too dangerous for me.

Lite4
07-18-2009, 09:04 AM
Hey Dave,
I totally agree with using a tall ladder whenever possible. But, there are some instances where the perfect mounting location is out on a long thick branch that is (although rare)to high to rest a ladder on to reach. A scissor lift is an option but very expensive everytime you need to service the fixture. I have been coming across trees on my prospects lately that are clear of limbs all the way up to 30-40'. Having worked in Boise in the high desert for so many years it wasn't really a huge deal because I didn't run into a lot of large trees. Different story here though. I just think it would be cool to rope off to a big limb like that, and use ascenders to slink up and service/install fixtures. I know it would guarantee a service contract as a side benefit.

nikster78
09-25-2010, 06:31 PM
The ability to climb does offer a guarantee. And perhaps a niche. I am an avid climber though i understand my days of climbing will end one day. I have a network of climbers and this may take me the long haul. I hate to see lights mounted on a trunk 28' up when we could have taken the extra step in hiring a professional climber.200350

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nikster78
09-25-2010, 06:38 PM
This has always offered a niche for me....


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Mark B
09-25-2010, 07:02 PM
I wonder how long that picture will stay up. They removed my aviator for since it had a finger sticking out on a sticker. Bringing a thread back up. You have been doing some searching huh.. Carry o
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nikster78
09-25-2010, 07:25 PM
A show in the making.. loving every minute of it! Bringing up more after these messages.:usflag: Is this america...keep it real :weightlifter:

nikster78
09-25-2010, 07:27 PM
This has always offered a niche for me....


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I like that Merc NIk..lmao.....4 seconds later. I love that merc Nik