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View Full Version : rust on lawns Help!!


justcut33
07-18-2009, 02:11 PM
need help in Michigan have 60 accounts 80% have rust disease how do I get this taken care of?
Any suggestions on type of fixes.

cclanton2
07-18-2009, 02:29 PM
Fore will work. It goes in at 2 water dissovable bags per 90 gallons of water. Or a pinch per gallon in a backpack. It may need a second treatment in 10 to 14 days.

RigglePLC
07-18-2009, 03:44 PM
Plenty of fertilizer and water helps. Also get better quality--more disease resistant seed. Ryegrass is especially sensitive--even more so in the first year of new grass.

mikesturf
07-18-2009, 10:54 PM
Plenty of fertilizer and water helps. Also get better quality--more disease resistant seed. Ryegrass is especially sensitive--even more so in the first year of new grass.

I agree with Riggle 100%. All the rain we had this spring depleted a lot of the nitrogen leaving lawns ripe for rust this summer. We've had a very cold summer, so I'm going to start my fall app in early August to grow out the rust.

justcut33
07-19-2009, 09:25 AM
i spoke with fertilizer company and they said to use triple 19 fertilizer to green it back up, another company told me to use Ringer lawn restore does anyone know if either of these will help, he also said that we would be seeing alot more of it because of the weather we have had and because of our poor economy people are not having their lawns fertilized like they would have in the past, also does anyone know if it can be carried from one lawn to another from my mower since i am seeing it in atleast 80% of my accounts, thanks again for any help

mikesturf
07-19-2009, 10:56 AM
Personally for rust, I would not use Ringer Lawn Restore. You need a quicker release, higher nitrogen fertilizer. Problem is its summer and you don't want a lot of growth. Check this link.

http://www.ces.purdue.edu/extmedia/BP/BP-110-W.pdf

LOT depends upon prior fert schedule of affected lawns. And yes, rust can be spread by shoes and equipment. It can also be spread by kids/mailman going from lawn to lawn.

Its an easy disease to deal with (and profitable). Good thing is you usually only need a good shot of fertilizer and within a few weeks it is gone, the lawn is green and your recently fertilized lawn stand out from the others on the block. Take pictures of before and after-ask for references-go door to door with pictures, etc.-great way to increase business. Each rust affected lawn could net you 4 extra customers!

justcut33
07-19-2009, 01:42 PM
any particular product that you would recommend to put on the lawns, some of the lawns have turned from the rust color to a brown and looks as though the infected blades have died anyway on getting them back to green the fertilizer guy said Ringer lawn restore would bring it back to green but he did say it would take a few weeks, any particular product you would recommend that would help it green even the brown or dead looking blades, thanks again

FdLLawnMan
07-19-2009, 02:13 PM
It sounds like you are not an applicator. If not, rust on the lawn is not your problem. You certainly cannot apply any type of fungicide without a license and the 19-19-19 is a poor choice for the fertilizer. If these people were cutting back on fertilizer why would they pay you to put it down.

RigglePLC
07-19-2009, 03:27 PM
You need the grass to grow--grow fast. Rust causes lawns to look really yellow. Yuck! When the grass gets tall you mow off the infected leaf blades. A high nitrogen product is the best choice. Along with plenty of water. Lesco 24-0-11 would work.

justcut33
07-19-2009, 04:08 PM
i am not claiming to try and be a fertilizer applicator nor do i have a license to apply it, what i do know is that i care about my customers and would like to correct an unsightly lawn and direct them to the best product to use to correct it, for what ever reason that people have decided to cut back on getting their lawn fertilized is their choice but it is not fair to them to have a lawn that looks yellow or rusted, i only hoped that someone would have ran into this same problem and could help out, FDLLawnMan i am not looking to take advantage of my customers i am not asking them to pay me to put it down either i had only hoped that someone had this same problem and had used something that worked without having to pay for an expensive fungicide, i do appreciate everyone who can give me any advice on what has worked in the past

FdLLawnMan
07-19-2009, 05:47 PM
i am not claiming to try and be a fertilizer applicator nor do i have a license to apply it, what i do know is that i care about my customers and would like to correct an unsightly lawn and direct them to the best product to use to correct it, for what ever reason that people have decided to cut back on getting their lawn fertilized is their choice but it is not fair to them to have a lawn that looks yellow or rusted, i only hoped that someone would have ran into this same problem and could help out, FDLLawnMan i am not looking to take advantage of my customers i am not asking them to pay me to put it down either i had only hoped that someone had this same problem and had used something that worked without having to pay for an expensive fungicide, i do appreciate everyone who can give me any advice on what has worked in the past
That's great of you. I never said you were looking to take advantage of your customers but you should have explained a little more your situation. Rust will seldom harm a lawn long term. Tell your customers if they don't like the rust to apply or have someone apply a 50% slow release fertilizer with little to none P & K at 1 lb per 1000 Sq. Ft. with water. I would never apply a fungicide
for rust. We had a lot of rust last year dur to a wet summer. Other than being ugly for several weeks the lawns were fine.

justcut33
07-19-2009, 07:37 PM
thank you so much FDLLawnMan it is just that the lawns have turned from the yellow or rusted color to brown and looks like they are dying in those spots i was concerned on what to recommend to them on what to put down, any particular product you would recommend that works, thanks again

Grandview
07-19-2009, 08:46 PM
Grass can out grow rust. It needs nitrogen and water to grow. My choice of nitrogen would be urea and ammonium sulfate. Start with a pound of N/1000. If the customer will not water it does not pay to fertilize unless rain is adequate.

mikesturf
07-19-2009, 10:31 PM
thank you so much FDLLawnMan it is just that the lawns have turned from the yellow or rusted color to brown and looks like they are dying in those spots i was concerned on what to recommend to them on what to put down, any particular product you would recommend that works, thanks again

If you are looking for some "magic" fertilizer to get rid of the rust, you are just reading too much into it. Like RigglePLC said you need to get the lawn growing with fertilizer and irrigation (rain or sprinkler). If you are not licensed, you may wish to "practice" on your lawn and friends/family's lawns before you try fertilizing your customer's lawns. Stay with Lawnsite, USE THE SEARCH function-80% of what you find here is correct and will help you. Also do internet searches-Illinois (UofI) and Indiana (Purdue) have excellent college websites to learn about diseases, fertilizing, insects, etc. (MI may have something too?). Right now you see people that need help with their lawns (rust problems). These same lawns may have grub problems in September. With some homework, practice, knowledge-in a few years your customers will be bragging everyone!

justcut33
07-19-2009, 10:58 PM
just thought that someone would have ran into this same problem and used a particular product that would have helped resolve the problem, i didn't think that there was a miracle product that would fix it overnight but had hoped that someone would have used something that had worked for them, i guess you are right i will look somewhere else for advice on this, thanks for everyones time

mikesturf
07-20-2009, 01:40 AM
RigglePLC already told you; Lesco 24-0-11. I use 25-0-5 from my supplier. You need to fertilize and have them water it in.

sd night train
08-04-2009, 12:02 PM
I am having this rust in NE South Dakota. We had a very wet early summer and my lawn was looking very nice. I de-thatched and over seeded in the spring with a starter fertilizer and I waited to fertilize (weed and feed) until about a month ago. Now I have been noticing rust in the last 2 weeks. The weed and feed took care of the weeds that I had but I dont think the application did anything for the beauty of my lawn.

1. I have read that Corn Meal is a great solution to this problem. How does it compare to the 24-0-? fertilizer that has been mentioned?
2. Also, why dont we want to put any phosphorus on the lawn now?
3. What is recommended in the spring as a good pre-emergent for weeds? I read that Corn Gluten Meal is good for this...what else is recommended?
4. I have lived in this home for 2 years...last year we had no yard do to doing the landscaping. Would this be a good time to Aerate?

Thanks

RigglePLC
08-04-2009, 10:41 PM
According to soil tests most lawns do not need phos--and it is a major source of water contamination. Not much nitrogen in corn meal--I would not expect it to do much for rust. Unless you are organic--Scotts crabgrass control Like Halts would last longer than corn gluten meal. Don't bother to aerate unless you have soil compaction.

sd night train
08-04-2009, 11:41 PM
Sorry for my ignorance...I am just a homeowner....not a commercial lawn care specialist...how would I know if I have lawn compaction?

Pardon my lack of fertilizer vocabulary here but 24-0-12, 25-0-18...what is best and what is the difference? How do I avoid burning my lawn?

newguy1976
08-05-2009, 11:24 AM
I have the Rust problem on a 1 yr old lawn up here in Massachusetts. I applied some turfbuilder fert. last week and so far the rust hasn't gone away. Actually its gotten worse. The grass looks green but when you walk through it your shoes are orange. Any suggestions? I have been using the irrigation with the fert. and its been 1 week. RUST hasn't gone away*trucewhiteflag*

newguy1976
08-05-2009, 11:30 AM
Massachusetts RUST
I have a rust problem and treated it with Scotts 29-2-4 turfbuilder. It has been a week and still the RUST is there. Do you have to wait for it to grow out?

sd night train
08-05-2009, 11:33 AM
I guess this is what we get for buying the cheap bag of mixed grass seed....bluegrass, ryegrass, fescue mix. I planted in the early spring of 2009. It is only happening on the new grass that I planted this year. I'm hoping its an annual ryegrass that is taking on the rust.

RigglePLC
08-05-2009, 09:11 PM
Most ryegrass is very susceptible to rust in the first year, next year less so. You should visit the seed company's website and in the future try to buy only ryegrass varieties that claim to be resisistant to rust.

Rust is probably not spread by walking through it. The spores blow up on southerly winds from frost free areas of Texas every year. The infestation moves north a couple hundred miles per week. Problem ends when weather cools off in fall--frost pretty much ends the problem until next year.

DA Quality Lawn & YS
08-06-2009, 02:01 PM
Most ryegrass is very susceptible to rust in the first year, next year less so. You should visit the seed company's website and in the future try to buy only ryegrass varieties that claim to be resisistant to rust.

Rust is probably not spread by walking through it. The spores blow up on southerly winds from frost free areas of Texas every year. The infestation moves north a couple hundred miles per week. Problem ends when weather cools off in fall--frost pretty much ends the problem until next year.

Ditto - my best account developed rust - 1st year majority ryegrass lawn that was hydroseeded. Pure junk seeding if you ask me, cheaply done. I have put down two apps of high quality fert, one month apart, 50% slow, 1lb of N per K each app. There is still some rust there, but it does look quite a bit better than the orange yellow of about 5 weeks ago. This does provide a guy the opportunity to upsell an aerate/overseed job to introduce better varieties of grass suitable for the location. If the seed job takes well, you could be a hero:)

sd night train
08-06-2009, 08:19 PM
what is considered high quality fertilizer? I put down Menards brand 30-2-3 today and it has been raining for about 4 hours....looks like we will get about another 2 hours of rain

sd night train
08-07-2009, 02:42 PM
The local extension office told me not to fertilize this late in the season....rust or not

Young Bros
08-07-2009, 07:36 PM
We use Fore 80WP for rust.

FdLLawnMan
08-07-2009, 08:49 PM
The local extension office told me not to fertilize this late in the season....rust or not

So tey are saying no fertilizer for the rest of the season. That flys in the face of normal fertilization practices on cool season grasses. The most important fertilization occurs after Labor Day. Fertilize with a 50% slow release and you will be fine.

mngrassguy
08-07-2009, 10:44 PM
The local extension office told me not to fertilize this late in the season....rust or not



That is just plain wrong.

sd night train
08-08-2009, 10:56 AM
their reasoning is that if you fertilize during hot weather that you may burn the lawn if you dont keep 1-1.5" of water on it a week...we have had 2 good downpours the last 2 days after I fertilized...the lawn is greening up quite nice already...we'll see what happens to the rust

mngrassguy
08-10-2009, 02:30 AM
Maybe but like FD said above, fall is still the best time to fert. Therefore, that statement is dead wrong.

greendoctor
08-10-2009, 08:38 AM
We use Fore 80WP for rust.

I hope that is on a golf course or sod farm. Fore is not to be applied to residential lawns. As inexpensive and effective that product is, all of that means nothing when you are applying contrary to labeling. I keep it legal with Prostar or a "strobin" fungicide.

Marcos
08-10-2009, 09:56 AM
The main thing regarding rust, and alot of other turf disease is... that many of you folks have your contracted turf literally spoiled to death because you're always tempted to simply throw N at every situation, to... "grow the problem away".

That's somewhat akin to putting a cork in the backside of a leaking dam.

When you or one of your family members are sick, does your doctor attack one of the superficial symptoms?
:confused: No!
A reputable doctor will get to the underlying problem(s), treat them 1st and foremost, and THEN maybe treat any symptoms, only as a comfort to the patient, and if he/she sees fit.

Rust is a condition brought on primarily by humidity & local air movement, or more accurately, LACK OF air movement.
Yes, it is true that a lawn that is growing more rapidly will overcome rust, I don't disagree.

Where I part ways with this thread is that "more rapid growth" of turf needs to start in the very makeup of the soil itself, and NOT just what type of temporary junk food ( i.e...19-19-19, 24-5-11, etc) gets thrown onto it to put out the fire.

Start with a program of feeding the soil...:)
High protein meals such as corn meal, soybean meal, alfalfa meal & cottonseed meal can be applied much the same way as fertilizer, on a rotating 4 or 6 week schedule, using your everyday run-of-the-mill Lesco spreader, Perma Green, or any decent commercial spreader, as long as it has decent agitation.
The main difference with using meals is that you'll need to apply between 600-800 lb/ acre (15-20 lb / K sq.ft), and that you'll need to learn how to sell to your customers & prospects the underlying concept that you're not out to just "fertilize their grass", but rather, to..."build their SOIL", too! :)
Then of course, there's always compost topdressing, but that requires different equipment altogether!


And as far as rust is concerned, a good shot of green turf dye is all that's really ever needed.
Green dye will in effect give enough cosmetic effect to get the most demanding customer through their distress, plus it keeps most of the red off their shoes.
Most of the time the supporting conditions change quickly enough that the pathogen goes into a dormancy all on its own.

a plus bob
09-22-2009, 04:11 PM
.....................

milike
09-22-2009, 06:46 PM
.....................

ME too...I agree..:confused:

newguy1976
09-22-2009, 07:58 PM
I had my soil sampled and tested. I posted it on my other thread. Basically the Dr said the rust and other diseases it had were a result of poor drainage. They gave instructions on how to amend my soil (aggressive aeration w/sand etc.) I have done this and am on my way to a healthier lawn. If anyone wants to see the full report from the lab if they had a similar problem let me know and I will did it up and post it.
Thanks

newguy1976
09-22-2009, 07:59 PM
I mean "DIG" it up and post it

:clapping:

Young Bros
09-23-2009, 09:14 AM
I hope that is on a golf course or sod farm. Fore is not to be applied to residential lawns. As inexpensive and effective that product is, all of that means nothing when you are applying contrary to labeling. I keep it legal with Prostar or a "strobin" fungicide.

This is the label for Fore. It says not for use BY HOMEOWNERS. It says nothing about a licensed applicator applying to residential lawns. Maybe your state laws are different than mine. I keep everything 2 the label.

http://www.bissettnursery.com/hardgoods/Images/MSDS-Labels/label-fore-80wp_62719-388_20070108.pdf

Young Bros
09-23-2009, 09:16 AM
Speaking of soil, we apply gypsum and humaphos to our customers lawns to help condition the soil.

Young Bros
09-23-2009, 09:18 AM
The local extension office told me not to fertilize this late in the season....rust or not

Iowa State U found fall fert is very important to the health of the turf the following season.