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View Full Version : how do you quote trimming bushes


walkermt26
07-20-2009, 09:05 PM
just landed my first bush trimming job......driveway alone is 1/4 mile how do you quote trimming bushes and hedges ? is there a formula you use? please help:confused:

Kutz Lawns
07-20-2009, 09:21 PM
Easy....by the hour!

walkermt26
07-20-2009, 09:24 PM
what is the normal rate per hour? 40-75 dollars ? i don't want to under charge but i don't want to over charge either

bohiaa
07-20-2009, 09:32 PM
REmember the clippings, they have to be raked up and disposed of

jnrogers
07-20-2009, 09:56 PM
Small bushes $10 each, Medium size $15 dollars each, larger bushes $20 each. If this is too high then good I hate doing bushes anyway.

david shumaker
07-20-2009, 09:57 PM
what is the normal rate per hour? 40-75 dollars ? i don't want to under charge but i don't want to over charge either

I try to get at least $40.00 per hour. Sometimes it comes to a little less or more.

I estimate how long the job will take and give the customer a flat rate. For example if I think it will take 2 hours and I want $40.00 per hour, I quote the customer $80.00. Some people will growl if you say $40.00 or $50.00 per hour. They don't know how long the job will take, so they may not growl as loud with a flat price.

It takes a few jobs to figure how long a job will take approximately.

Like said above, figure how long it will take to clean the mess up and dispose of it.

You may want to charge extra for shubs that are as tall as a tree. They can be a pain and hard to struggle with. Shrubs with stickers are a pain too.

LouisianaLawnboy
07-20-2009, 10:23 PM
I charge 60 per hour. Tell them you think it will take 2 hrs, and if it does then it will be 120. Also explain it may take longer.
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Florida Gardener
07-20-2009, 10:41 PM
As others have said, what you want to make per hour times how long you think it will take. Just some advice, if you think it will take 2 hrs, estimate for 2.5. It is very easy to underbid trimming. Be careful to note how overgrown the hedges are. Some that don't get trimmed for a while become harder to trim. Good luck buddy.

balreadysaid
10-27-2009, 08:59 PM
wow 1300 ft bush! lol i do a bush that is 325ft and i charge about 200 to do it 350 if she doesnt have it cut for a while! takes 3 hrs at most.

Premier landscaping south
10-27-2009, 09:18 PM
My formula is as follows:
ground to waste high $8
waste to head $16
after this the price will go up quick due to having to use a ladder which I do not reccomend. Some insurance policys do not allow this for obvious reasons.

PLS

Roger
10-27-2009, 11:25 PM
I am confused. The OP said "landed my first bush trimming job." But, the rest of the posts discuss pricing. To the OP: How much did you quote for the job before landing it? If you have already been given the work, you must have already given a price to the customer.

Why am I confused?

To follow other posts, ... I keep very good records of trimming jobs with regard to time. Often I have splits written down. Doing the math, I know how many minutes for type A bush, type B bush, etc. And, what extra time may be required because of access? Knowing the working rate, new jobs can be estimated using my knowledge base. Yes, I'm looking to get $/hr, but always quote the entire job. Yea, sometimes I do better than expected, other times, not so well. Over the years, I've gotten much better with the experience. But, for me, keeping good records is critical.

Smallaxe
10-28-2009, 08:53 AM
The first job is 'your first job'. You may want to pay them for the opportunity to express your talent.
Everyone who drives onto the estate is going to see what you have done... good or bad!

Set your base hourly rate and plan of spending a lot of time doing it excellently. Then if it seems high for the job, prune the price if you need to, to keep the customer happy.

Job number 2 will be easier. Don't rush job number 1.

br549oicu8
10-28-2009, 09:31 AM
The first job is 'your first job'. You may want to pay them for the opportunity to express your talent.
Everyone who drives onto the estate is going to see what you have done... good or bad!

Set your base hourly rate and plan of spending a lot of time doing it excellently. Then if it seems high for the job, prune the price if you need to, to keep the customer happy.

Job number 2 will be easier. Don't rush job number 1.

Excellent advice!

mdlwn1
10-28-2009, 10:24 AM
I would highly recomend when you are finished to measure the square ft..all sides and the top of all the trimming you did. Figure the amount you were paid to trim 1 square foot. This is the only consistant way to estimate in the future. I learned this at Brickman and it eliminates the guesswork.