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stuvecorp
08-04-2009, 11:32 PM
I try pretty hard to cut it close but always end up with a few block or pavers left over. I can get the supplier to take back some every once and awhile but I hate having these odds and ends that accumulate. What do some of you do? I am doing some small projects around the shop to try to burn product up.

DVS Hardscaper
08-04-2009, 11:46 PM
I usually let them accumulate and then sell them for a fraction of what we paid.

About 4 years ago I made about $2500 from selling left overs. I'd just place the pallets along the busy road with a cardboard for sale sign on each pallet stating the price. They usually sold within 4 hrs every time. CASH.


This spring I sold about a 3 yr accumulation. Now we're at a different location and don't have the road frontage. So I take pictures of each pallet and post them on Craigslist with the price and approximate square footage imprinted on the picture. Didn't do to shabby on the sale of left over pavers again this year :)

Duffster
08-04-2009, 11:58 PM
I try pretty hard to cut it close but always end up with a few block or pavers left over. I can get the supplier to take back some every once and awhile but I hate having these odds and ends that accumulate. What do some of you do? I am doing some small projects around the shop to try to burn product up.

I just make a habit of returning the leftovers right away.

JeffY
08-05-2009, 12:18 AM
Donate them to your local habitat for humanity reseller. They can use every bit of it and you can write it off as a donation.

DVS Hardscaper
08-05-2009, 08:15 AM
Donating them is a great idea. It would never work for us, though. A busy company with employees on the clock, it would be nearly impossible to bundle left overs up and truck them to such a facility, especially if the facility is out of the way.

steve5966
08-05-2009, 10:28 AM
Donating them is a great idea. It would never work for us, though. A busy company with employees on the clock, it would be nearly impossible to bundle left overs up and truck them to such a facility, especially if the facility is out of the way.

DVS, it's a donation. You should be able to bundle your labor with the product.

Around here we can't return any pavers that are not full pallets but hollandstone. I bid by the pallet and anything left over the customer can keep or we sell them. It's always nice to have a few extras around.

DVS Hardscaper
08-05-2009, 09:39 PM
DVS, it's a donation. You should be able to bundle your labor with the product......






Thanks, but thats not quite what we're about. We sell production hrs, not product.

We work long days, often starting at 6am and sit in DC area traffic. Last thing we want to do at the end of a long day is venture off the beaten track with a 30,000# truck and trailer. Plus the trailer is connected, thats a pain in the butt to fool with at someone else's yard. Much easier to pull into our own yard and unhook trailers and unload, than it is to unhook to donate pavers, hook back up, then unhook a second time at the yard to unload the tools, etc.

We have about 15 more pallets to get rid of. I can taste the cold beer and the all you can eat MD Crabs now!!!




,

JimmyStew
08-06-2009, 09:12 AM
If all else fails, trash them. I always bid extra product (nothing worse than running short and having to run out for more product - especially since my dealers are all a one way drive of 45 minutes) and the leftover stays with the homeowner or we haul it to the dump! There are a few exceptions, clay brick and hollandstone plus another "local" product that we tend to use quite regularly. We keep these at the shop and reload for other jobs if it works out. I like the idea of selling them on craigslist, although we don't usually have enough laying around to attempt this. Maybe though.

DVS Hardscaper
08-06-2009, 07:03 PM
Thats how I got stated with selling our left overs. I was dumping them in our dumpster. And I got to thinking "I could probably get $50 for this partial pallet if I place it along the road".

You'd be amazed how many people only need 40 SF.



,

mrusk
08-06-2009, 08:42 PM
I used to bring home all the extras, untill I realized I hated having to unload them when I got home. I normally junk the extras or bring them back to my supplier even though he does not give me a refund.

On a big project I normally order one pallet shy of what we need. My supplier is 5 minutes from my house, its no big deal to pick up a couple or rows of pavers on my way out one morning.

LB1234
08-06-2009, 09:44 PM
take them to a place that recylces concrete if it ain't that much. a few "yards" of pavers is only about 50 bucks to recycle. By us you get charged by volume not weight.

DeereHauler
08-06-2009, 10:15 PM
right now they are accumulating behind my barn. i keep a handful of each job "just incase" i have already had one problem where a style or color was discontinued and we needed to replace a paver or 2 for some reason. large amounts i try to return or sell.

TimNNJ
08-06-2009, 10:47 PM
I sold an old paver patio and walkway that I needed to take up..put it on cl and some people came took it all up ..and I ended up getting around 600 bucks..

JDavisLandscapes
08-08-2009, 11:33 PM
I usually estimate pretty close. I will usually have 10-20 extra blocks. I have been saving them according to color and style and order light on another project with the same block and use them up.

JimLewis
08-11-2009, 05:03 AM
We had our first "Landscaping Garage Sale" last fall. It was the end of the season and like everyone else here we had dozens of pallets of left over product. Anything from a few pieces of flagstone to half a pallet of a certain kind of paver. We had piles of basalt wall rock, decorative pots, plants we had been asked to remove from some properties that were still nice plants, step stones, used wall blocks that people asked us to remove, and some older equipment that we didn't use anymore. It was all stuff that was fairly useless to use as there was too little of it to do any decent sized job with.

In 2 days, we made about $2,500 cash. Just took a few photos and advertised on Craigslist. Paid one of my workers to sit at our shop all day and wait for visitors. It was like landing a small landscaping job except without all the work. It's amazing because some of the stuff actually sold for more than it cost us. For instance, some people just wanted one or two small rock boulders from the basalt wall rock pile. Well, we buy it by the ton, so one boulder would cost us maybe $3-$5. But people would pay us $10-$15 for some of them. Same thing with some of the pieces of flagstone. It seems people aren't interested in purchasing stuff by the ton. But you sell it to them one at a time and they'll pay double! LOL.

Not everything worked that way. Most of the stuff I had for sale at over 50% off wholesale prices. I didn't care. The materials were all long paid for and accounted for. So It was just a way to clean our yard and make some money at the same time off stuff that was fairly useless for us.

4Russl5
08-16-2009, 02:16 PM
I reuse every piece leftover from stone projects. All the small pieces leftover from shaping patio stones I use for 'hearting' for the insides of stone retaining walls and fences. Anything under 16" square goes to my house where I am building a 45' long dry stone fence. Leftover big sheets, 2' x3' and up, I leave at my shop and reuse on other projects. Between the pile at my house and my shop, I have about 15 tons on the ground.

All we do is natural stone, so having piles seperated into sizes and types at our shop works great when we need some specific shape, or if we need more for a project.

zedosix
08-16-2009, 08:24 PM
They sit at my shop (about 50 pallets or so) I move them on occasion to make room for new stock and after a couple of seasons I throw the rest out. I don't want poachers in my yard looking for brick.

crazymike
08-17-2009, 12:08 PM
The question is, why do you end up with so many extras? Maybe I'm cheap, but I like to make cuts from cuts of cuts that were already cut. There will always be a bit leftover, but you can always use that towards the next job of the same stone. I don't see why you would have multiple pallets of stone left over. Even when using several different types of stone, I don't seem to end up with more than 1-2 rows of what I need.

It's pretty easy to calculate material and factor in cuts. It takes a bit of extra time, if there are a lot of curves, etc... you might need to grab a pen and paper and figure it out, but it's well worth it.

JimLewis
08-17-2009, 04:20 PM
The question is, why do you end up with so many extras? Maybe I'm cheap, but I like to make cuts from cuts of cuts that were already cut. There will always be a bit leftover, but you can always use that towards the next job of the same stone. I don't see why you would have multiple pallets of stone left over. Even when using several different types of stone, I don't seem to end up with more than 1-2 rows of what I need.

It's pretty easy to calculate material and factor in cuts. It takes a bit of extra time, if there are a lot of curves, etc... you might need to grab a pen and paper and figure it out, but it's well worth it.


I can't speak for everyone else. But to answer some of your questions, here is why we end up with lots of pallets left over.

First of all, I don't ever have full pallets left over. You'd have to be seriously overestimating or have some really huge jobs going on to end up with that much. We typically have a few rows. Sometimes half a pallet.

With pavers, the reason we can't re-use them is because we have SOO many types of pavers, colors of pavers, and sizes of pavers that by the time we ever do another job in that same exact paver, same exact SIZE of paver, and same color of paver, it might be 2-3 years. So we end up with several partial pallets of pavers. For instance, we might have 3 rows of the Willamette Graystone "Appian" pavers, with a mixture of the 6"x6" and the 6"x9" in the 'granite' color option. So who knows when we'll have another job with those exact sizes and colors and type of paver.

I don't like to hold on to stuff that long. It just clutters up the shop.

So that's pavers.

As for flagstone, that's a little more difficult to estimate. Because some varieties of flagstone are 2" thick and only cover 80 sq. ft. per ton, some are 1.5" thick and cover 100-120 sq. ft. per ton, and some are 1" thick and cover even more sq. ft. per ton. A lot of the flagstone we have around here is mixed thickness. So that makes it even more difficult to estimate. So on flagstone jobs we'll just bring in one or two pallets at a time. It's cheaper to buy the flagstone in full pallets anyway. Then maybe we end up with 1/2 pallet left over at the end of the job. So same story there as the pavers. We probably WILL get another flagstone job using that same variety of flagstone at SOME POINT. But who knows when that could be. Could be 6 months. Could be 3 years. So if we haven't used it up by the winter, I'd rather just get rid of it and get some money out of it rather than clutter up our show for who knows how long.

Pretty much same story with SRW blocks. We usually don't have too many left over. But anywhere from 5-20 blocks is pretty normal.

Same story with wall rock. We know we'll eventually use it up on another rock wall. But when October comes, we pretty much know we're not going to be seeing any rock wall jobs for at least 5-6 months. So no point in saving the pile of wall rocks and cluttering up our parking lot for 6 or more months just to save $100 on the next rock wall job. If we can make $50 or more selling them, then we clean up our lot and make some money back from it.

DVS Hardscaper
08-17-2009, 06:58 PM
I think most competent, veteran contractors know how to estimate job materials. I believe it's safe to say that most of us will over estimate the qty of materials, yet, we'll hold a pallet back at the supplier just incase we don't need it. We usually factor a 10% waste factor. However, I'd bet our waste is around 3-5%.

And with these new style pavers that resemble natural stone? They're larger pavers, and in all reality, depending on the paver itself, some of them you can't necessarly reuse for 3 different cuts, thus we factor a 15% waste factor when using certain larger, natural stone style, pavers.

We have a few different suppliers we deal with. One of my requirements for us to buy pavers or wall block from a supplier is that we must be able to buy layers, rows, or straps. We will not buy from a supplier that sells ONLY full cubes. Now, if they refer a job to us, then we'll buy the materials from them to do the job they referred to us.

Most of our jobs we end up with 2-4 layers of pavers left over.

In the pic below we did a 3,000 s.f. pool deck With inside and outside cutting of radiused cutting (cutting along the pool coping and cutting along the outer perimeter). 3,000 SF with over 200 linear feet of cutting. And take a look at how small our waste pile is!


http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y212/ScapeItWS6360CJ7/300LFPaverCutting.jpg

stuvecorp
08-17-2009, 11:43 PM
Like Jim said, it's the handful of product that gets left over. I took back 12 caps from the last project, it was two semi loads so yah I do try to cut it as close as possible. I pretty much have 3-4 different colors of Versa-Lok but you have weathered/tumbled also. I just get sick of them laying around. Here is what I did with some left over pavers from different jobs at the shop. This was five different pallets of various amounts and I kind of like the techni-color paver pad.