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View Full Version : Finished bluestone sidewalk pics


4 seasons lawn&land
08-08-2009, 07:54 PM
nothing too extensive but i think it came out pretty well. 4 ft X 30 ft. The stone itself could have some more color for bluestone.

P.Services
08-08-2009, 09:42 PM
looks very nice woulda looked better if it was set in mud eh? and had nice straight lines cut on the edges.

4 seasons lawn&land
08-08-2009, 09:49 PM
you mean cemented? I like dry construction personaly. Much more natural as well as traditional look, especially in front of an old farm house, dont you think? I considered cutting the edges but left it for the same reason. That part scares me cause there's no putting it back if it ended up looking too formal or contemporary. I could still do it though. Think I should?

P.Services
08-08-2009, 09:50 PM
yes on second thought, taking the house into consideration i agree with you.

Bru75
08-08-2009, 11:59 PM
Looks nice, good job fitting the stones.
Only two things: the top step seems to be a little narrow (maybe it's just the pic), and that one joint that runs all the way across the walk at a 90 degree angle about halfway up, my eye just keeps going to it.
I like the rustic look, it matches the house.

CertPro
08-09-2009, 05:10 PM
Those steps look like a real ankle breaker. I do like the walkway though. Do you want grass in the joints?

4 seasons lawn&land
08-09-2009, 06:11 PM
moss in the gaps and ya there are ankles laying all over the place by now...

DVS Hardscaper
08-09-2009, 07:03 PM
Yeah, first thing my eyes went to was the steps. I think you otta go back and re-do them correctly.

4 seasons lawn&land
08-09-2009, 07:44 PM
what is not correct to you?

shovelracer
08-09-2009, 08:08 PM
Feel free to correct, but here's what I see. The steps look to be all different rises. Maybe 7", 6" and 9". The little upper guy is not really safe. Take those shrubs out add a little darkness and it's a bad problem. In my experience they wont last long constructed dry like that.

4 seasons lawn&land
08-09-2009, 08:42 PM
steps are, rise 7", run 15", rise 7", run 30", rise 7". There is no overhang, all surface is supported. If it's because of the shrubs then all steps are dangerous.

shovelracer
08-09-2009, 08:52 PM
I dont buy that the upper step is the same as the others. The big problem is the small upper step. Someone could potentially step off anywhere in between the posts. The step should be at least that wide. Supported steps means little. Go over there and start jumping on and kicking the steps to see how long before they start moving. At the very least they should be one solid piece. Walking on them with heels isnt an option.

Duffster
08-09-2009, 09:05 PM
The top step looks like it is closer to 12" then 7".

burnthecouch
08-09-2009, 09:20 PM
Couple of snapped blue stone steppers would have worked a lot better in there.

Stone Creations
08-09-2009, 09:44 PM
I agree..walk looks good..rustic and natural..the top step is way to narrow..I could see myself completly missing the top step and landing on the second step twisting my ankle and cursing out the guy who did that!!

4 seasons lawn&land
08-09-2009, 09:50 PM
That top step is 30 inches... most steps are 10-12... you must fall down alot.

4 seasons lawn&land
08-09-2009, 09:52 PM
Couple of snapped blue stone steppers would have worked a lot better in there.



That would've looked way better. That's what I really wanted to do but this saved 500 bucks. I agree though, it would look great with full size steppers.

DVS Hardscaper
08-09-2009, 10:30 PM
The top step is not good. No matter how you may wanna think.

Let me try to put this into prospective as to why:

Ok, when we build a patio with steps, we try to make the top step (landing) so that people can comfortably step out of the house carrying a cheese platter, platter of drinks, etc., without having to stop and look down to make sure their footing is right so they don't take too big or too small of a stride as they step out of the dwelling.

The top step in the pic is not safe for anyone moving furnature, large appliances, carrying groceries.

So now your next reply is "they have a side door for carrying in groceries, etc". That may be the case, but that doesn't mean their son-in-law is going to use that door when he comes to visit.



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4 seasons lawn&land
08-09-2009, 10:36 PM
actually no, that isnt my reply. My reply is how seven square feet isnt enough to do those thing's...lol

DVS Hardscaper
08-09-2009, 10:51 PM
There is plenty of room to make half moon steps work. And plenty of room to do all the aforementioned.

These are important aspects that a competent, wise contractor needs to pick up on.

This is exactly why I like to be the last contractor to meet with a prospective client. Because if there are particular logistics that need addressed, you can be assured I'll pick up on it and I WILL make it a point to discuss with prospective client. And they'll say "oh DVS darling, I'm glad you brought that up, none of the others ever said anything about that. My Hero."



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tthomass
08-09-2009, 10:53 PM
The problem isn't the square footage of the step but the fact that they are rounded. Had they been rectangle shaped, you would have gained a lot more real estate. For rounded steps/landings you have to make them over size just to be normal size.

The steps will work but what we're getting at is next time make them rectangle shaped or make the radius larger.

4 seasons lawn&land
08-09-2009, 10:58 PM
ya, thats cool. You misunderstood my question though. I said how is seven square feet not enough to do those things? The step IS seven sq ft... those "things" are carrying cheese and what-not.


edit- this post is for the DVS hero guy, not prev. poster

4 seasons lawn&land
08-09-2009, 11:03 PM
The problem isn't the square footage of the step but the fact that they are rounded. Had they been rectangle shaped, you would have gained a lot more real estate. For rounded steps/landings you have to make them over size just to be normal size.

The steps will work but what we're getting at is next time make them rectangle shaped or make the radius larger.


that makes sence. there is a ledge that really would only come into play if the hedges were gone, which could happen I guess. Good tip though I'll keep it in mind.

tthomass
08-09-2009, 11:16 PM
Yeah ignore DVS.......he thinks he knows everything when really I have the answers......

DVS Hardscaper
08-10-2009, 07:01 AM
Lol


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Bru75
08-10-2009, 08:59 AM
4 seasons, I generally like to make the top step as wide as the distance between posts. That way if somebody steps off next to a post there is something other than the ground to catch them.
Like I said before, the walk part looks good.

P.L.
08-10-2009, 06:18 PM
It looks like your stone is set on soil so grass or moss can grow in it. If thats the case why did you need to excavate the exsisting soil ect just to bring in more to set it on?

Stone Creations
08-10-2009, 06:24 PM
There is plenty of room to make half moon steps work. And plenty of room to do all the aforementioned.

These are important aspects that a competent, wise contractor needs to pick up on.

This is exactly why I like to be the last contractor to meet with a prospective client. Because if there are particular logistics that need addressed, you can be assured I'll pick up on it and I WILL make it a point to discuss with prospective client. And they'll say "oh DVS darling, I'm glad you brought that up, none of the others ever said anything about that. My Hero."



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:clapping::clapping::clapping::clapping::clapping::clapping::clapping:
same here bro!! I visit every job the same way..(lets see what the " I wanna,um I think i can" previous mason forgot to address..

skidster32
08-10-2009, 06:44 PM
looks good! now all they need to do is trim the bushes treat the yard for broad leaf, and cut down the crap silver maple in the front yard...other than that ya did a pretty good job!

4 seasons lawn&land
08-10-2009, 08:11 PM
It looks like your stone is set on soil so grass or moss can grow in it. If thats the case why did you need to excavate the exsisting soil ect just to bring in more to set it on?




:laugh: please tell me your joking.

P.L.
08-10-2009, 08:38 PM
What is in between the stone? It looks like soil to me.

4 seasons lawn&land
08-11-2009, 02:42 PM
yes, when you finish flagstone you spread a material of choice into the gaps, stone dust, soil, etc.

kaferhaus
08-18-2009, 09:59 AM
I like it. I do think the steps are a potential safety hazard just from the pictures.

The problem with pictures though is that they're 2 dimensional.... it's really hard to tell if they're actually safe or not without getting a 'real eyeball" on them.

Nor would I "straighten" the walk.... In some cases it does look better but in this one I think it fits as is.

36metro
08-23-2009, 08:38 PM
The job looks really nice. I think you'll see an amazing difference when the grass grows back in. I'd have to agree with a few others in that the top step is a safety issue. Not sure your climate but if ice and snow are common in winter watch out. Being that it's constructed dry it shouldn't be a huge issue to reconstruct a little larger step area.

All in all a very nice looking walk. Just curious to your sub base material. 6-8" of gravel compacted, then 2-3" of sand compacted?