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newguy1976
08-14-2009, 11:39 PM
My lawn was hydroseeded this spring. It was filling in great until the last days of July. I looked into Organic Solutions Compost Tea Brewer and put down 10 gallons of tea on the lawn. (approx 7,000 sq feet) The next morning I noticed that when I walked thru the grass I has orange on my shoes. After several posts and 2 days , I put down some fertilizer and thought it should clear up the problem. Its almost been two weeks and the grass is still giving off that orange dust. Does LEAF RUST really last this long or do I have some other problem. The grass look pretty good but is a major nuisance when people feet and shoes are orange after walking through it.
Can anyone tell me how long this last????
Thanks

White Gardens
08-15-2009, 11:34 AM
My lawn was hydroseeded this spring. It was filling in great until the last days of July. I looked into Organic Solutions Compost Tea Brewer and put down 10 gallons of tea on the lawn. (approx 7,000 sq feet) The next morning I noticed that when I walked thru the grass I has orange on my shoes. After several posts and 2 days , I put down some fertilizer and thought it should clear up the problem. Its almost been two weeks and the grass is still giving off that orange dust. Does LEAF RUST really last this long or do I have some other problem. The grass look pretty good but is a major nuisance when people feet and shoes are orange after walking through it.
Can anyone tell me how long this last????
Thanks

Yup. Generally it doesn't do any major damage to lawns. It all has to do with weather conditions and some things are out of your control.

Cooter
08-15-2009, 03:15 PM
Cheap annual rye grass is also more suspectable to rust. It will go away on its own usually and does little harm.

Cooter
08-15-2009, 03:16 PM
Cheap annual rye grass is also more susceptible to rust. It will go away on its own usually and does little harm.

newguy1976
08-16-2009, 02:17 PM
but now the soil seems to be getting a little slippery under the grass?

Now what

White Gardens
08-16-2009, 02:38 PM
Probably late season compaction. As soon as you put water down your probably creating conditions with the harder soil and when you water it just becomes slick.

I wouldn't think you would have slime mold, or anything of the sort in the lawn.

Smallaxe
08-17-2009, 09:40 AM
How well is the ground drying out between waterings?
Around here, we have had trouble getting anything to dry out for a few weeks now.

newguy1976
08-18-2009, 02:44 PM
the grass looks green but now is slick in some shaded areas.

I'm bringing a specimen out to the UMASS extension school to have it tested.

I'll post the results.

How is that homeowner brand of fugicide? Infusion...Infuse or something like that...its in an orange bag back at home. I am waiting for the test results before putting it down.

newguy1976
08-21-2009, 10:23 PM
I posted the results of my lab test in hopes it will help others diagnosis a problem instead of just treating the symptoms (which is what I was about to do with two bags of INFUSE ) Now I realize ,as one of the earlier posts recommended, that the compaction issue is causing the problems.
Thanks again
Heres the report:




Soil of the specimen received was extremely compacted. Two minor foliar pathogens were detected-Rust and Curvularia. Rust appears to be confined to the fescue; if reseeding a resistant cultivar should be considered. Pythium blight was also observed and is the cause of the matted grass and greasy, slimy nature of grass. Soil compaction negatively impacts turfgrass by restricting normal air and gas exchange as well as root growth. The penetration of the soil by water, nutrients, and plant roots is impeded. Soil compaction is difficult to correct without major renovation. Restrict traffic of people and machinery on affected areas. An aggressive aeration program, removing many 2-4 inch deep soil cores and filling aerification holes with sand. The addition of sand will improve soil structure and improve drainage.

Foliage of specimens received were infected with Rust fungi. Rust diseases occur on all turfgrass species and are caused by many species of Puccinia and Uromyces. Infected turfgrass foliage serves as the overwintering site for these pathogens and spores may be transported long distances by wind. Optimal temperatures and growth and sporulation occur between 68 and 86 F (20-30 C)and leaf wetness is required. Rusts diseases usually become most severe in grasses that are growing slowly or are under stressful conditions such as drought, nutrient deficiency, low mowing height, and/or infection by other pathogens. Once the turfgrass is weakened by rust infection, it becomes more susceptible to adverse environmental conditions and other pathogens (ie Curvularia) Irrigate and fertilize as needed to prevent water and nutirient deficiencies or excesses. Water infrequently, thoroughly, and in the early part of the day. Avoid mowing be! low recommended height for grass species. Mow regularly to remove infected leaf tips and collect clippings when Rust diseases are severe (if possible). Prune trees and shrubs to improve light penetration and avoid structures or landscapes that impede airflow (increase humidity) over turfgrass. Many grass cultivars possess high levels of resistance to rust diseases; include one or more resistant cultivars in blends or mixtures of seed and sod. Fenarimol (Lesco Twosome), myclobutanil (Eagle), propiconazole (Banner MAXX), and azoxystrobin (Heritage) are registered for rust diseases on turf. Apply according to label directions.

Curvularia blight was detected on specimen received. This disease attacks all species of turf and appears in warm wet weather. This disease is considered to be a minor pathogen that occurs mainly on turfgrass stressed by other causes. High temperatures are required to predispose plant to infection. The disease spores survive in plant debris such as thatch. Removal of thatch is a key component to cultural control of this disease. Reduction of moisture levels and correct fertility are important to turf's recovery and resistance. Avoid over use of systemic fungicides as these chemicals can worsen disease damage through hormonal changes. Contact fungicides work well for control of this disease. Chlorothalonil, maneb and PCNB are effective selections against this problem.


Pythium blight was detected on specimen received. Pythium is a natural inhabitant of the soil and requires specific conditions to become pathogenic. These conditions of high temperatures, high soil moisture, and high humidity permit growth of this disease. If conditions remain conducive, large areas of turf can be lost in as little as 24 hours. Good soil drainage and drying of turf canopy is essential for the effective management of Pythium. Heavy watering will increase the severity of the disease. Light watering at sunrise and syringing at midday will help to manage the blight. Complete avoidance of nighttime watering is recommended. Improved air circulation by pruning of trees and shrubs will help to reduce leaf canopy moisture. Proper fertility levels are also important as high nitrogen heightens damage. Apply a preventative application of mefenoxam (Subdue Maxx), cyazofamid (Segway), phosphites (Alude), propamocarb (Banol), etridiazol (! Koban), chloroneb (Terraneb SP), or foestyl-aluminum plus mancozeb (Signature plus Fore) on a 10-14 day schedule when disease pressure is high. These fungicides are not available without a commercial pesticide license; if Pythium blight develops next year after soil compaction has been corrected, consider contacting a lawn care company for treatment.

White Gardens
08-21-2009, 11:13 PM
It seems like all the lawns that I've seen struggle are due to compaction and water issues. Seems to be to cause or root of most major issues.

Sounds like you need to do a lawn renovation, unless you don't think it's too bad and you can do aerations on it twice a year.

Stillwater
08-22-2009, 01:55 AM
My lawn was hydroseeded this spring. It was filling in great until the last days of July. I looked into Organic Solutions Compost Tea Brewer and put down 10 gallons of tea on the lawn. (approx 7,000 sq feet) The next morning I noticed that when I walked thru the grass I has orange on my shoes. After several posts and 2 days , I put down some fertilizer and thought it should clear up the problem. Its almost been two weeks and the grass is still giving off that orange dust. Does LEAF RUST really last this long or do I have some other problem. The grass look pretty good but is a major nuisance when people feet and shoes are orange after walking through it.
Can anyone tell me how long this last????
Thanks


I got the same on my lawn drives me nuts, I gave it a big jolt of N by spraying ammonia and increased mowing to 2x's a week with bagging and it is almost grown out now. I also stay off those areas if possible.

Smallaxe
08-22-2009, 09:19 AM
I am glad to see that they are giving out sensible advice. That they are explaining what the problem is. N isn't going to be utilized very well on a soil structure labelled "highly compacted". Most of it will be washed away as quickly as it would on a sidewalk.

The solution to adding sand in the holes was great!!! Maybe that crazy old wives tale is finally put to rest!!! :)

newguy1976
08-22-2009, 05:24 PM
Does anyone know where I can get some good instructions on 1. When to do the areation and how long to leave the holes empty, if at all. 2. how do you put the washed sand down(what techniques, in small piles, spread it with a broom, rake ...etc)

I also am wondering what qualifies as a major lawn renovation. I just did that this spring. Are they talking about the aeration program? Does that qualify as a major renovation? When I do the areation and add the sand this should fix the problem...no?

What other kind of restoration is there besides the aeration?

White Gardens
08-22-2009, 05:58 PM
What other kind of restoration is there besides the aeration?

To me aerations are a long term process for a lawn. The aerator doesn't go deep enough to be completely effective in highly compacted soils. It takes years for the soils to recover and aerations will help over-time.

To me, a renovation consists of killing existing turf, tilling deeply (at least 6 inches) after good amendments have been brought in. After that sod or seed.

Unfortunately, depending on how bad your soil is, you may do a renovation and it might compact back down after a few hard rains.

Seeing some of the sub-divisions around where I live, I feel that tilling is the only way to relieve the majority of compaction.

You might check around too and see if someone has a sub-soiler for lawns.