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View Full Version : Upper class subdivison and brown grass


theheisk
09-03-2009, 04:52 PM
Hey i am fairly new to the lawncare game and learn alot through this website...which is awesome! My question is there is a very nice subdivision in my area that evey lawn is brown. Can anyone tell me why as i am very curious. Its been very wet this year and everyones yard is green except these.
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Two Seasons
09-03-2009, 06:52 PM
Cutting it too short would be my guess. That and zero fert.

kirk1701
09-03-2009, 10:46 PM
Cutting it too short would be my guess. That and zero fert.

Or just the opposite, all the homes in the subdivision used TruGreen which fertilized the hell out of them in Mid August when we had this breif short dry spell and hot weather :laugh:

I say that because TruGreen was just across the street from me about a two weeks ago and back again this week :dizzy:

baddboygeorge
09-04-2009, 12:08 AM
Cheap ass builders using a builders grade sod , its a blend an cant handle the heat , with no irrigation guess wat i turns brown,,,, Great area to Market Irrigation!

Smallaxe
09-04-2009, 10:05 AM
Good area to market almost anything. I would go around the neighborhood and tell them you are curious as to why their lawns are brown.
Most likely they will started ragging about something they think is the cause, then you can, offer them the solution.

Central Island Lawn
09-05-2009, 10:37 AM
If I were to make a guess I would say improper installation with poor or no irrigation. Take a shovel to one and dig a hole 8 inches deep, it'll tell you all you need to know. There is a guy in my town who landscaped the first phase of a subdivision in my area. He used rocky fill and lay his own crappy sod on top. No soil, no sand. The irrigation systems were not properly designed and the pipes were installed in rocks. He was more than likely the lowest bidder. Needless to say, the only guy who has a desent lawn in that neighbourhood did his own landscaping.

Think Green
09-05-2009, 06:00 PM
Heisk,
Just because it has been a wet season does not produce excellent turfgrass. Excess water on poor subsoils, will not feed a lawn. Most soils are depleat of Nitrogen and iron.
P and K are less likely to leach out of the soil as they are bound by clay particles.
Clay soils, low pH, compaction, are responsible for poor turfgrass quality as well as poor mowing practices or the wrong type of turgrass on the site.
Most times, home builders do skimp on the final installation of lawns, as they are usually low budget by then and the landscaper's usually haven't much to work with in the field of correct growing environments. Poor topsoil, poor subsoil quality, compacted soils, building material burial and overall poor quality planning is the case of crappy grasses.
The type of grass is key to why they are brown. Improper chemical control or overmixing is seen in browning turfgrass's all treated by the same applicator.
It is hard to surmise why these lawns look terrible..........maybe no irrigation!
Just because it rains alot doesn't mean that rain is properly absorbing into the top and sub soils. Run-off is usually the problem and no more than 10% is absorbed. Too much absorption and saturation will cause root disease, fungus, and death or browing of the lawn.
Soil testing is needed to see if the pH is off................Calcium and Magnesium is needed. One or the other is needed in the case of hard and soft soil. Micro-nutrients are and could be depleated and tied up with clay soils. Low organic matter and natural soil is evidentaly not present.
Start with soil samples... understand the sample results.................sell them on fertilizer applications, and I am sure that if these lawns are this bad, they are in need of weed control and disease control...

White Gardens
09-05-2009, 10:43 PM
If I were to make a guess I would say improper installation with poor or no irrigation. Take a shovel to one and dig a hole 8 inches deep, it'll tell you all you need to know. There is a guy in my town who landscaped the first phase of a subdivision in my area. He used rocky fill and lay his own crappy sod on top. No soil, no sand. The irrigation systems were not properly designed and the pipes were installed in rocks. He was more than likely the lowest bidder. Needless to say, the only guy who has a desent lawn in that neighbourhood did his own landscaping.

Good post.

Most sub-divisions in my area are stripped of topsoil and what is left is a hard, compacted clay layer.

Check out the soil conditions, and I'll bet some good money that the PH is off too.