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DVS Hardscaper
09-05-2009, 10:14 AM
Here's a nice project we are working on.

Broke up 2200 SF of concrete. It twas a 6" concrete pool deck with some sort of hideous, epoxied pea-gravel applied to the top. The home owners could not stand it. We're putting down Techo's Santorini. We're not changing the shape as space is very limited.

Flagstone coping is being replaced with a bullnose coping.





http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y212/ScapeItWS6360CJ7/Pool%20Deck%20Renovation/IMG_0726.jpg


http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y212/ScapeItWS6360CJ7/Pool%20Deck%20Renovation/IMG_0728.jpg


http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y212/ScapeItWS6360CJ7/Pool%20Deck%20Renovation/IMG_0825.jpg


http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y212/ScapeItWS6360CJ7/Pool%20Deck%20Renovation/IMG_0826.jpg



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bigviclbi
09-05-2009, 11:30 AM
I'd try to save that bluestone coping. You could definately use it again or send it to me. Is that pool vinyl or concrete?

shovelracer
09-05-2009, 01:33 PM
Nice size project. I love those auto pool covers. Real hard to get debris in the pool.

paponte
09-05-2009, 03:08 PM
Smart idea with the solar cover. We advise every pool reno to spend the couple of hundred and get one. The Taki sure as hell beats a Brute! Keep the pics coming, I personally love the santorini, but its usually a hard sell.

SOUTHERNGREENSCAPES
09-08-2009, 08:50 PM
I would have used the tried and true pallet forks and not the breaker on that concrete. that had to be a mess.

DVS Hardscaper
09-08-2009, 10:33 PM
I would have used the tried and true pallet forks and not the breaker on that concrete. that had to be a mess.


You're way off on that, 'ol buddy.

#1. you would have gone through 2 or 3 diamond blades!

#2. 2200 SF with a 6-inch slab. No wire. No rebar. Brick home. Brick columns. Brick Fountain. All the brick would have been broken, chipped, scratched! With correct precautions, breaker on a correct size machine - it's an effortless task.

Not really a biggie, bust up the concrete, pick up with skid steer, load onto dump truck, haul away.

AztlanLC
09-08-2009, 11:00 PM
forks? cmon have you ever used a hammer to know the difference

DVS Hardscaper
09-08-2009, 11:08 PM
I took 12 loads out. Approx 4.5 cu. yds. / load (6" concrete ain't light!)

Do the math and that's alotta concrete to try tp pop up with forks!

For small jobs we use forks for lifting concrete. Infact, looked at a job tonight. Home owners said "will you jack hammer up the concrete". I replied "nah, we'll make a few cuts and lift it out with a skid loader".

Junior M
09-08-2009, 11:20 PM
6in!? who the hell made the decision to pour that much concrete. We've built a few pools and it'd be the biggest pain to have to grade for 6inches. Might actually have to use a lazer.. :laugh:

AztlanLC
09-08-2009, 11:46 PM
I would never use forks on that size and thick slab, like DVS said it hammer is much faster and safer for the sorrunding

zedosix
09-10-2009, 05:21 PM
We have removed a # of concrete decks from pool surroundings to driveway entrances. I have always used a skidsteer with forks and a mini x with thumb. I cut the lines first with a quick cut to score it and its removed with minimal time and mess. If the concrete is over 6" then I agree a jackhammer may be better suited.
Side note, we all have our preferred methods which usually means whatever we own we try to use first. If we are renting a machine its the logical choice to use a jackhammer att. on a mini x.

mrusk
09-10-2009, 09:35 PM
With no rebar in it you could of pulled it up with just a excavator bucket.

Moneypit
09-10-2009, 09:53 PM
Junior M
6in!? who the hell made the decision to pour that much concrete. We've built a few pools and it'd be the biggest pain to have to grade for 6inches. Might actually have to use a lazer..

How does the thickness of concrete effect the difficulty of grading?? I dont get it.

DVS Hardscaper
09-10-2009, 11:05 PM
With no rebar in it you could of pulled it up with just a excavator bucket.


LOL - I'm sittin here at my dining room table reading the replies. I come across this one and can't help but to chuckle out loud!

As I chuckle, I think to myself - "I'm glad the know it all message board nerd is such super dooper looper expert about our job!" :hammerhead:

Maybe if a slab is out in the open with no structures around - you could maybe pull it up with an excavator bucket! I mean, in Rusk's world I take it the lonely housewives come outside in the nude to serve him lunch?? :weightlifter:

Reality is when you have other OBJECTS that you have to be carefull with, you can't come in like a bunch of unrulely cowboys and just start ripping stuff up from the ground! LOL

Physically you could do whatever comes to mind. Although they just installed a new turn about on Rt 15 south in MD, they broke up the asphalt with a breaker....not a bucket :) On I-270, they been removing concrete from the center of the interstate.....with breakers on 2 huge excavators......not buckets :)

Come back down to earth and the reality is that if you're a competent professional - you use the correct tools for the job, and you don't inflict damages to your client's 2 million dollar property.........




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tthomass
09-11-2009, 12:13 AM
Damn that round about! I about drove into the thing when we went to pick up that car. I hadn't been up since it was put in and we're cruising up the road with some buddies in the truck and suddenly "hello". I think lights are on it now but it was dark then. All I saw was mountain of Purple Cone Flower in front of me all of a sudden.

Come on down 15 past Leesburg, they just put (4) of them in front of where I'm at. Traffic is a mess as they still are finishing #4.

-End rant

DVS Hardscaper
09-18-2009, 11:13 PM
http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y212/ScapeItWS6360CJ7/Pool%20Deck%20Renovation/IMG_0832.jpg






When breaking up concrete around the skimmers, you must be careful not to damage the pedistal that holds the skimmers. The pedistal is usually poured with the pool's walls. We offer a speciality service pertaining to swimming pools, therefore we were already knowledgeable of such.

http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y212/ScapeItWS6360CJ7/Pool%20Deck%20Renovation/IMG_0833.jpg




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LB1234
09-18-2009, 11:36 PM
how come your laborers aren't in shorts?

wurkn with amish
09-19-2009, 12:49 PM
The new yellow Banana hammocks haven't come in yet.!!!!
What are you using for coping?

DVS Hardscaper
09-19-2009, 04:11 PM
how come your laborers aren't in shorts?

I told 'em to harry up and get pants on because I was takin a picture and didn't wanna be reported to O.S.H.A.

DVS Hardscaper
09-19-2009, 04:13 PM
........What are you using for coping?


You'll be excited to know that coping install photos have been shot. Will be processed and uploaded maybe this weekend, maybe this coming week, or the week after, who knows. Stay Tuned.






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PlatinumLandCon
09-19-2009, 05:28 PM
You'll be excited to know that coping install photos have been shot. Will be processed and uploaded maybe this weekend, maybe this coming week, or the week after, who knows. Stay Tuned.






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We'll be at the edge of our seats until then!

tthomass
09-19-2009, 06:25 PM
Did you perform a nuclear density test?

DVS Hardscaper
09-19-2009, 08:41 PM
Did you perform a nuclear density test?

No. Never have we ever done any nuke testing.

tthomass
09-19-2009, 09:40 PM
Paver Pete says you should.

mrusk
09-19-2009, 09:48 PM
Paver Pete hahahahahha. Is anyone really impressed that hes laid pavers in 40 countires? Seriously wtf? If he was really such a paver god he would of either A) started Paver Pete paver installation service B) Paver pete paver manufacuring C) Be a laborer on DVS's crew

4 seasons lawn&land
09-19-2009, 10:26 PM
how do you install a cantilever pool coping?

LB1234
09-19-2009, 10:32 PM
Paver Pete hahahahahha. Is anyone really impressed that hes laid pavers in 40 countires? Seriously wtf? If he was really such a paver god he would of either A) started Paver Pete paver installation service B) Paver pete paver manufacuring C) Be a laborer on DVS's crew

he may be a bit arrogant...you may not agree with what he has to say...etc...but he is a great public speaker. He knows his audience.

DVS Hardscaper
09-20-2009, 11:14 AM
Paver Pete hahahahahha. Is anyone really impressed that hes laid pavers in 40 countires? Seriously wtf? If he was really such a paver god he would of either A) started Paver Pete paver installation service B) Paver pete paver manufacuring C) Be a laborer on DVS's crew


At least Pete isn't 20 some years old and a virgin livin with mom.

DVS Hardscaper
09-20-2009, 11:17 AM
how do you install a cantilever pool coping?

The pool's header (a header is the top of the concrete walls) is 9-inches wide and the coping is 12-inches, givin it a 3-inch overhang, which the automatic cover will bolt to.

Twitchy
09-20-2009, 11:17 AM
Did the tiles around the pool pop off during the demo? What make is that tamper.

4 seasons lawn&land
09-20-2009, 01:12 PM
The pool's header (a header is the top of the concrete walls) is 9-inches wide and the coping is 12-inches, givin it a 3-inch overhang, which the automatic cover will bolt to.


How does it get fastened? The coping to the pool i mean.

DVS Hardscaper
09-20-2009, 08:20 PM
Did the tiles around the pool pop off during the demo? What make is that tamper.

The tile was in not the greatest shape before we started. Many of the tiles were loose before we started. The home owner stated that they kinda neglect the pool during the winter, meaning when it fills with water or snow - they have never pumped the water so that it maintains below the tile, thus the tile has frozen.

So the Mrs. told us not to worry about the tile because they would have new tile installed.

Which brings up another point. It is my personal opinion that the older the pool - the better the craftsmanship of the installation of the tile. The newer the pool - the poorer the installation. With that said, for those that will / may be doing paver work around pools - I suggest you have some sort of a clause in your agreement covering this. Also, be sure to explain the potential of disturbing the tile to the client upon initial consultation, as well as during signing of the contract. Back in June we worked with a pool that was built in 1961, and the tile on that pool wasn't budging!

Tamper is an Ignersol Rand. Has a couple tiny features that Wacker doesn't.




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DVS Hardscaper
09-20-2009, 08:30 PM
How does it get fastened? The coping to the pool i mean.


The coping is mortared to the concrete header. I have a busy beginning of the week coming, hopefully towards the end of this coming week I'll have time to down load pics to the computer and upload to the internet.

I can see guys wanting to use adhesive. It won't work. The header is not perfectly level, you need mortar to adjust the levelness. And the coping looks more finished with grouted joints.

mrusk
09-20-2009, 09:01 PM
dvs what features does the tamper have that the wacker doesnt?

DVS Hardscaper
09-20-2009, 10:14 PM
dvs what features does the tamper have that the wacker doesnt?

I'll be glad to answer this question. But please realize we all have our own personal reasons for preferencing one machine over another.

The biggest thing for me with IR vs Wacker is that IR is more easily servicable. It's almost as if IR took a Wacker and studied it and said "ok, what can we do to make this so people like it better?".

Some guys will take a machine to a mechanic anytime the slightest thing happens to it. Me, as long as parts are available I'll fix it and keep it forever, 95% of the time I work on our equipment myself. The IR is much more user friendly in terms of servicing the belt. And the vibrator is easily accessible. Whereas with our Wacker - the vibrator is not easy to access, and the belt requires a little more effort to get to it. Also engine swapping on the IR is much more easier/friendly compared to Wacker. Others may not care about these things, but I do, I'm the one who works on it. Someone set forth some thought into designing them.

IR also has adjustable handlebars.

DVS Hardscaper
03-10-2011, 05:04 PM
This thread has some age to it.

I finally have some finished pictures of this job.

The pool deck is tough to shoot because it's heavily shaded all day. So being there at the right time, when the sun is at the right position is challanging. The pics were shot with Fuji 35mm Superia Reala, with a wide angle lens.

The pool is NOT dirty!!! They had the pool completely re-done. New Plaster and new tile. The tile they went with is a VERY VERY VERY dark blue, therefore it makes the water appear black! I think it's Wicked :)

The shape of the pool was the shape of the previous concrete pool deck. Client was NOT interested in changing the shape.

DVS Hardscaper
03-10-2011, 05:10 PM
And no, the pics aren't blurry. Lighting was really bad. Like I said, unless I pay a pro photogragher, it's a tough spot to shoot, which is why it took so long to get final pictures.


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TomG
03-10-2011, 07:54 PM
Nice work! Unfortunately I cant see the original pictures at the beginning of the thread it says they are deleted. I always like looking at before and afters. One question, in the fourth picture showing the nice even curve of the patio. How did you mark that to be cut? Do you find the center of the radius and then run a string line from that out to the edge and have a person walk at the end of the string and mark it? If that makes any sense that's what we do. I'm just curious to your method, because it looks really good.

DVS Hardscaper
03-10-2011, 08:30 PM
Nice work! Unfortunately I cant see the original pictures at the beginning of the thread it says they are deleted. I always like looking at before and afters. One question, in the fourth picture showing the nice even curve of the patio. How did you mark that to be cut? Do you find the center of the radius and then run a string line from that out to the edge and have a person walk at the end of the string and mark it? If that makes any sense that's what we do. I'm just curious to your method, because it looks really good.

I'll have to post the other pics. I forgot those pics no longer are there!

Thats the infamous radius! This was an existing concrete deck that we demoed and removed. For most of the project we duplicated exactly what was there. No plans were drawn. So there was no radius for us to measure out like there would be if it was a new job from scratch.

The previous deck was in closer to the pool.

Our beloved client was having a bad week. As you can tell by the house, this is an extremely high end client. And when such people are having a bad day/week while you're working there guess who gets the brunt of it!

So they accused me of making the patio smaller! What they did not realize is I shot pictures of the old patio from multiple angles. And I measured certain points and I made notes in my notebook of the measurements. We got in a huge argument! They did NOT shoot before pictures. They swore up and down that I shrank their patio. I got the photos and tried to show them to the Mrs showing her that if anything the patio was larger. She REFUSED to even look at the photos.

So after her and I fighting like brother and sister (she is only a few years older than me) I said "helen, I have no problem making this patio however you want it, I don't like the current shape, I'd much rather make it larger and give it better form, but you need to stop yelling at me and accusing me of things just because you feel like it".

So she started being nice.

We got out the snap edge and her and I layed out the outer perimeter using the snap edge, not using any center points and not measuring anything. Almost all our radiuses on all our jobs are layed out with snap edge over the pavers, then the snap edge is traced with a pencil and pavers are cut.

Even our jobs that are from scratch and have a plan with the center of the radiuses shown are still layed out with snap edge, traced, and cut. But yes, we'll usually put a steel stake in the center and measure out from there and mark the radius. Then we use the snap edge to mark a perfect, clean line.

We do most of our outside cuts with a stationary saw. Only once in a while do we cut with a cutoff. And yes, my guys are good with cut off saws, infact one of them worked at a company for many years that does not even own a real paver saw. I like the results of a table saw better.



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SVA_Concrete
03-10-2011, 08:54 PM
I'll have to post the other pics. I forgot those pics no longer are there!

Thats the infamous radius! This was an existing concrete deck that we demoed and removed. For most of the project we duplicated exactly what was there. No plans were drawn. So there was no radius for us to measure out like there would be if it was a new job from scratch.

The previous deck was in closer to the pool.

Our beloved client was having a bad week. As you can tell by the house, this is an extremely high end client. And when such people are having a bad day/week while you're working there guess who gets the brunt of it!

So they accused me of making the patio smaller! What they did not realize is I shot pictures of the old patio from multiple angles. And I measured certain points and I made notes in my notebook of the measurements. We got in a huge argument! They did NOT shoot before pictures. They swore up and down that I shrank their patio. I got the photos and tried to show them to the Mrs showing her that if anything the patio was larger. She REFUSED to even look at the photos.

So after her and I fighting like brother and sister (she is only a few years older than me) I said "helen, I have no problem making this patio however you want it, I don't like the current shape, I'd much rather make it larger and give it better form, but you need to stop yelling at me and accusing me of things just because you feel like it".

So she started being nice.

We got out the snap edge and her and I layed out the outer perimeter using the snap edge, not using any center points and not measuring anything. Almost all our radiuses on all our jobs are layed out with snap edge over the pavers, then the snap edge is traced with a pencil and pavers are cut.

Even our jobs that are from scratch and have a plan with the center of the radiuses shown are still layed out with snap edge, traced, and cut. But yes, we'll usually put a steel stake in the center and measure out from there and mark the radius. Then we use the snap edge to mark a perfect, clean line.

We do most of our outside cuts with a stationary saw. Only once in a while do we cut with a cutoff. And yes, my guys are good with cut off saws, infact one of them worked at a company for many years that does not even own a real paver saw. I like the results of a table saw better.



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same snap edge process here, but we use our regular cut off saw and put a 12" blade on it. the smaller blade does wonders for cutting arcs.