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View Full Version : Whats up with my lawn? 3 questions


drobin
09-26-2009, 06:23 PM
Being in the business (1st year) its a little embarassing that my lawn looks like the pits,

question1 pic 1 (dsco2552) pic 2 (dsco 2555) is this lawn disease? or what is the problem?

question 2 pic 3 (dsco 2556) this was newly seeded grass (mix of p rye and k blue) in the spring that looked awesome in early june, what happened ? we had a wet summer but a very dry sept, will it come back?

question3 Ive sprayed creeping charlie atleast 5 times with a gammot of things, ive noticed ive burned holes in the leaf, is this normal, should I not even bother spraying k charle until its November its so resilant it doesnt die .

foreplease
09-26-2009, 06:34 PM
Don't know what your rain has been like this season but suggest looking for active grubs in the soil.

turf hokie
09-26-2009, 06:42 PM
Looks very dry, especially under the cedar tree in the 3rd pic. Supposed to get an inch of rain tonite into tomorrow, a nice soaker, should help.

americanlawn
09-26-2009, 06:51 PM
Looks like the lawn is dried out bud. No insect/disease probs IMO. Guessing from the pics, it's mostly KBG & a little rye. We prefer KBG cuz it spreads, but it needs water to do so - especially under trees cuz when it rains, most of the water sheds out to the dripline instead of under the tree (pic #3).

Pic #1) I see acorns. Pic #2) I see oak leaves. Pic #3) The tree trunk looks really bad -- guessing this tree is on it's way out.

Bottom line - judging from your pictures, the grass looks dormant -- not dead. If I'm right, water a.s.a.p. thoroughly. Maybe some fert too.

Anybody else? :confused:

RigglePLC
09-26-2009, 11:18 PM
Look at pic 3. Like Larry said, it is dry under that tree. But I believe, it is due to tree roots competiton for the water with the grass roots. Common in late summer. We call this "root burn". It appears as a brown dry spot on the south side of a tree. It is worst where the roots reach out farther than the shade of the branches.

What is the white fuzzy stuff in the foreground? Fuzzy pic or is that fungus?

I am glad to see you at least OWN a hose. What are you using it for?

drobin
09-27-2009, 08:23 AM
Gotcha, That totally makes sense. The grass is dried out due to competition for water from tree, will this lawn come back? Another question? I understand that pic 1 looks like my lawn is dormant but why are other sections as green as could be, also would it be normal for my lawn to go into dormancy in late sept, its been warm 70s 80s during the day and a bit cooler 50's at night.

grass4gas
09-27-2009, 11:36 AM
Looking at the first pic, it looks light a severe case of tip blight that has bleached out. If you look close, you can see a couple of blades are green half way up from the crown, with the top half bleached (blighted).

With this being a newly seeded lawn, it is unlikely that the root system would have been more than a couple of inches in depth. Most cool season grasses take a good year to reach the 6-8" depth so as to be called "established".

If that is an Oak tree, they will suck up every last drop of moisture present. Tough to keep established lawns going, let alone new ones.

The last pic with the all the poc marks looks to be from something scratching at the surface for insects. Could be grubs. Is the turf somewhat spongy feeling, and lifts up like a rug? Very easy to check for them.

Alot of rain in my area, and I started seeing grub activity 3 weeks ago.

Good luck

RigglePLC
09-27-2009, 12:58 PM
Dormancy is a function of dryness. Cool temps at night will not help-nor will a heavy dew. Areas shaded by a garage or the east and north sides of a tree are protected from the heat of the sun. These areas will remain green longer--the soil is almost as dry as the sunny areas. Better--more drought resistant seed would help. Areas of tougher grass, like tall fescue will hold their color longer. Stick a screwdriver in as far as you can. One inch--too dry. 3 inches--adequate. 5 inches--wet.

RAlmaroad
09-27-2009, 01:02 PM
That last photographs has what looks like a Red Cedar from the bark and root system. Nothing will grow under them. They are only second from Magnolia to acidify the ground.
Even their needles and off fallings will kill grass. Over the last bunch of years, I found nothing that will neutralize Red Cedar turf. If it is not a cedar, what kind of tree do you have or photograph it with some folliage.

greenskeeper79
09-27-2009, 04:02 PM
brown (dormant) grass is your friend. No input needed and it will come back. Save $ on water, fert, mowing, etc. Green is over-rated in some cases.

Runner
09-29-2009, 06:23 PM
Don't mean to rain on anyone's parade her, but guess what, guys? I'm going with grubs. I know, I know!...we hate to see it; we hate to hear it, but it is happening! Pull the grass up near the edges of the brown/green edges. Does it pull up easy? Pull it up,...check and see. I bet that's it. I wish I was there,...I'd tell you in 30 seconds all of what is going on.

drobin
09-29-2009, 08:21 PM
Grub Test came back negative, screwdriver test revealed that it is not dry 3-5 inches each time, however we got rain a few times last week, the previous month was bone dry. so it definitley was dry, looks like its down to dormant or tip blight ?

americanlawn
09-29-2009, 08:21 PM
Kentucky blue can survive dormancy for only so long -- then you start losing turf (dead). Some say 5 weeks, some up to 8 weeks without water. But after that..........it goes from dormancy to "DEAD as a doornail".

Regarding turfgrass not able to grow under eastern red cedar trees, I kindly disagree. These trees are native here, so we see them everyday. Grass grows well underneath them.

This pic shows an eastern red cedar tree w/12 foot spread. Branches are close to the ground, and to the southwest = a "forest" of tall trees. )So much for shade being an issue). I took this pic at 6:00 p.m. CDT tonight at the back edge of my backyard. Mostly Kentucky bluegrass with some tall fescue, and the grass grows right up to the tree trunk (see pic).

CHARLES CUE
09-29-2009, 09:00 PM
Iam going with the dry lawn i see a yard thats abused .acorns that means a pretty big oak tree thoses root relay suck up the water like under the ceder tree dry spots under trees are always off to one side i see not only dry grass but dead spots from the past. The grass is not trimed tall weeds next to the house the yard does not look kept up.just run down what i see
Charles Cue

Smallaxe
09-30-2009, 09:04 AM
I agree with Charles.
Use this opportunity to experiment with lawncare. Keep the turf mowed at proper height, don't under water anymore, and don't overfertilize to compensate for improper cultural practices.

Do you know what kind of soil you have? and What did you learn from the screwdriver test??

gunsnroses
09-30-2009, 10:56 AM
I think you have dogs and or kids....am I right? That grass looks beat down. Look around and see if there is visible foot prints of brown grass. If the grass got hot enough and the roots could not keep up with the evapotransporation rate in the heat of the day, and then it gets walked on while it is hot as hell it will leave visible brown spots due to crushed cell walls. It looks to me like you had weak grass, it got close to 100, and your dogs and or kids played a game of kickball in the yard.

Kiril
09-30-2009, 11:10 AM
Grub Test came back negative, screwdriver test revealed that it is not dry 3-5 inches each time, however we got rain a few times last week, the previous month was bone dry. so it definitley was dry, looks like its down to dormant or tip blight ?

A screw driver is not going to tell you much of anything with regard to soil moisture. :dizzy: :nono:

Either get a cheap soil moisture meter (http://www.forestry-suppliers.com/product_pages/View_Catalog_Page.asp?mi=3052) or use the feel method (http://www.mt.nrcs.usda.gov/technical/ecs/agronomy/soilmoisture/guideline.html).

JDUtah
09-30-2009, 11:22 AM
Drought stress is my suspicion. KBG doesn't have very deep roots even when established. Was the rye annual?

whoopassonthebluegrass
09-30-2009, 11:43 AM
I took this pic at 6:00 p.m. CDT tonight at the back edge of my backyard. Mostly Kentucky bluegrass with some tall fescue, and the grass grows right up to the tree trunk (see pic).

Geez, Larry! Get a mower! :laugh:

americanlawn
09-30-2009, 07:44 PM
No sheet whoopass - you caught that eh? :laugh: I also agree with the above guys.....cuz the area around my eastern redcedar is a low area that holds water until the middle of July. Anything will grow there - plus the soil is excellent loam. Forgot to mention that. :hammerhead: Sorry

drobin
09-30-2009, 08:29 PM
Yes well I gotta admit that it has been dry, I should keep up better on the mowing, and my kids 8, 6, and 4 do play a lot on the lawn but what is strange is other sections adjacent look as green and healthy as Larrys lawn. Drought stress or dormancy I guess?

foreplease
09-30-2009, 10:11 PM
Let 'em play, the grass will come back. Might want to get them some squirt guns or water balloons though :)

greenskeeper79
10-04-2009, 05:47 PM
This pic shows an eastern red cedar tree w/12 foot spread. Branches are close to the ground, and to the southwest = a "forest" of tall trees. )So much for shade being an issue). I took this pic at 6:00 p.m. CDT tonight at the back edge of my backyard. Mostly Kentucky bluegrass with some tall fescue, and the grass grows right up to the tree trunk (see pic).

What is your HOC? A lot of turfgrass can grow in shaded areas if maintained at 12" ;)