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View Full Version : Need an effective way to change oil.


hummingbird3d
10-01-2009, 05:35 PM
I have a few mowers and other equipment that need an oil change. Last month I relied on gravity and an open oil opening to get oil out or I used a clear tube attached to a suction bulb (like what is used to drain aquariums.) Both worked, but both were also slow and messy.

I'm looking for a much easier way to do the oil change this weekend. The only idea I have is to use some type of rotary action pump maybe? I'd like to NOT have to take the bottom oil drain plug out, but rather go thru the oil filler hole.

Any good ideas out there?

grandview (2006)
10-01-2009, 06:47 PM
Why are you not just opening up the drain plug?

punt66
10-01-2009, 06:51 PM
go to tractor supply and get their oil change vacum pump for $30. Its the best $30 i have spent. I change the oil in all my equipment and motorcycle without spilling a drop.

mtchockey30
10-01-2009, 07:15 PM
have warm oil and do it through the oil drain.. Thats how you do it.

RobertProv
10-01-2009, 07:43 PM
I agree with punt66 an extractor is the only way to go for power equipment.

LushGreenLawn
10-01-2009, 07:54 PM
The extractor is the way to go, if there is no drain plug. (Or its a push mower, overseeder, aerator, or something else that the plug is hard to get to on.)
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MOHUSTLER
10-02-2009, 10:43 AM
At my shop we use to do the "open the drain plug" Then I bought a fuel evacuator. We paid around $60 for a good quality one. We now have 4 of them in the shop and I wont change oil without one. Works great on anything you want to drain.

I bought some bigger ones for tratcors and other equipment, they are about a 4 gallon size and in 2-4 pumps a mower is empty, its amazing!

topsites
10-02-2009, 11:40 AM
Why, just go find something else to do in the time it takes for the stuff to drain, what I do.
Better still is to plan so that more than one machine needs it, then do 2 and 3 at a time and before you know it things
are so hectic you'll be running around like a chicken with its head cut off lol

Why are you not just opening up the drain plug?

Maybe that's too easy?

have warm oil and do it through the oil drain.. Thats how you do it.

But maybe some folks want complicated methods.

RobertProv
10-02-2009, 02:40 PM
topsites, an extractor is alot faster, cleaner and does a better job-seriously.

Its sort of like the gas v diesel arugment, diesel's makes no sense until you get one and then the advantages become obvious.

metro36
10-02-2009, 05:28 PM
An oil extractor is the only way to go. I bought one for changing oil in a four stroke outboard and now I find myself using it in every oil change. I could do 5 engines with my extractor in the time it takes to do one by opening the drain.

RobertProv
10-02-2009, 08:27 PM
Exactly, plus you can let any idiot change the oil and not worry about overtightening or undertightening the plug-helicoils anyone..


Depending on the application an oil drain valve probably is just as good as using a sucker BUT we have found that the valves, in 95% of the applications we have had, the valve would dam up the oil just a bit-not much mind you, but I am anal about certain things, and oil changes are one of them.

Cleve
10-02-2009, 09:25 PM
The extractor idea sounds great, but what if there is no place to insert the suction tube?
Case in point, My Walker GHS has the Kubota diesel motor. The only opening to the crankcase seems to be the dipstick hole. Kinda small to get any size tube in. And this mower is also hard to get to the drain plug. Not a lot of room under the engine frame. I usually have to drive up on some 2" blocks to get enough room for a drain pan.
Or, am I wrong and are these holes O.K. for the suction tube?

dutch1
10-02-2009, 10:38 PM
If you have a satisfactory cfm air compressor, I would suggest the air activated vacuum. I have used one made by Thomas Industries for 10 years without a hitch--best thing since sliced bread. It has a 3-4 gallon reservoir and it will suck the oil out of the dipstick tube in 2 minutes or less on any equipment I service when the oil is reasonably warm. The suction line is 1/4" ID polyethelene. In some situations where the dipstick tube is metal and smaller ID(some of the Briggs Vanguards), I slip fit a smaller poly inside the 1/4" tubing. I can't recall any piece of equipment that I have not been able to pull through the dipstick tube. No fuss--no mess. Great for sucking water off the bottom of fuel tanks as well evacuating the tank.

I paid about $100 ten years ago and they may be higher now. It's the best non-tool service equipment I have spent money on.

May not be for everyone but it works for me. Your mileage may vary.

Dutch

Restrorob
10-02-2009, 10:52 PM
Guy's,


Most all engine manufacturers put the crankcase drain plug on the bottom of the pan/sump for a reason. This is so any sludge build-up/metal contaminates in the bottom can be drained as well, Yes I have a pneumatic oil evacuater I use ONLY on really hard to get to drain plugs and homeowner walk-behinds because I know they don't remove everything from the pan/sump.

If the engine is warmed up the oil will drain like water, How much faster do you need ?

If you have a unit with a hard to reach drain plug add a extension hose for easier access;


http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m314/Restrorob/Kohler/KohlerOilDrainAdapters.jpg


You can also have any hydraulic hose repair shop make any length hose needed for ease of oil changes.

Just my http://forums.wtf.com/images/smilies/twocents.gif

dutch1
10-02-2009, 11:57 PM
I won't argue with your point of view, Restro. I do have a slight advantage in that I have a five inch deep floor drain in my shop and can usually orient the machine to that the oil flows to the dipstick. I have tried removing excess oil after using the evacuator by removing the sump drain plug and the amount of oil and its dirtyness is negligable. Regardless of the method, I don't believe one will ever remove all the sludge if is present although proper warming of the oil is important.

Dutch

RobertProv
10-03-2009, 11:09 AM
resto, for center drains when the device that you are going to replace the plug with does not have more threads/does not extend further than the plug then a valve or hose works great-but even a single thread deeper will hold back a significant amount of oil.

For instance, I never used the Fomoto valve on any of our Jetta TDI's because the valve did create a dam, as it did on our Freightliner 'Sprinter' with the I 5 MB diesel and as it did on our Ford 6.0 PS, BUT on the wife's Subaru Forester and our Silverado, perfect and worth many times their weight in gold.

And I never had any luck finding metric nipples to use in power equipment plus most of the time there was not enough room to put then in anyway.

We have always pitched the machine back/side from the plug before we evacuated the oil out and for a while I would sometimes check the procedure by tilting the machine towards the plug, then removing the plug and seeing if any oil came out, not a drop would.

punt66
10-03-2009, 02:34 PM
I won't argue with your point of view, Restro. I do have a slight advantage in that I have a five inch deep floor drain in my shop and can usually orient the machine to that the oil flows to the dipstick. I have tried removing excess oil after using the evacuator by removing the sump drain plug and the amount of oil and its dirtyness is negligable. Regardless of the method, I don't believe one will ever remove all the sludge if is present although proper warming of the oil is important.

Dutch

i did that test the first time i used the extractor. Hardly any oil came out. Sludge will not come out with an oil change unless its suspended in the oil and in that case an exctrator will do the same. Harley davisdon dealers use extrators. Its not about the speed for me. Its the convienience and cleanliness of the extractor that gets my vote. It gets used on all my 4 cycle equipment.

STIHL GUY
10-04-2009, 12:44 AM
have warm oil and do it through the oil drain.. Thats how you do it.

its always worked that way for me

Breezmister
10-04-2009, 03:26 PM
have warm oil and do it through the oil drain.. Thats how you do it.

I'll have to agree with that...until you get a home owner's push mower that come in with a B&S or Honda that does NOT have a drain in the sump. :confused:

RobertProv
10-05-2009, 10:21 AM
breezmister, or say a Honda snow blower that has a piece of steel rolled over the edge of the machine that prevents you from getting the plug back on, after you manage to get it off-unless of course you cross thread it.

I have never ever seen Honda do anything stupid until this-imagine; the engine is mounted to the blower, and the drain plug, which has a 'shoulder' machined to it, hits this piece of steel when it is loosened-truly amazing.

Or say a Fradan push blower with a Honda (made in Thailand) GX, that does not have any room to put in a Fumoto or any quick drain adapter, including the one Honda sells.

A way to make oil changes very quick and clean would be one of the first areas addressed if I were making pro quality equipment.

punt66
10-05-2009, 10:24 AM
breezmister, or say a Honda snow blower that has a piece of steel rolled over the edge of the machine that prevents you from getting the plug back on, after you manage to get it off-unless of course you cross thread it.

I have never ever seen Honda do anything stupid until this-imagine; the engine is mounted to the blower, and the drain plug, which has a 'shoulder' machined to it, hits this piece of steel when it is loosened-truly amazing.

Or say a Fradan push blower with a Honda (made in Thailand) GX, that does not have any room to put in a Fumoto or any quick drain adapter, including the one Honda sells.

A way to make oil changes very quick and clean would be one of the first areas addressed if I were making pro quality equipment.thats what extractors are for.

Jay Ray
10-05-2009, 10:24 PM
I'm sold on the extractor -- but not for the break-in oil change.

I dread seeing the hour meter nearing the 50 hrs.

Other than using up a lot of shop rags stuffed tight to the block under the oil filter, does anyone have a special method to avoid the mess when changing it on a z or wb?

Breezmister
10-06-2009, 01:33 AM
Other than using up a lot of shop rags stuffed tight to the block under the oil filter, does anyone have a special method to avoid the mess when changing it on a z or wb?

Depending on the engine and cleanse, I have a bunch of old plastic oil bottles that I have cut open down to the neck and cap. Some on their sides, some on the flat. I can then place them under the filter. But before I take the filter off, I have a punch that I use to poke a hole in the filter, high side, then rotate the filter 180 degrees and poke another hole in it to let air in, letting most of the oil drain out in to the little catcher bottles. Then....

You won't get all the oil out, but if you hold the bottle up to the filter base before you spin it off, you will get most of it. You can also make funnels out of them.

Jay Ray
10-06-2009, 09:15 AM
Depending on the engine and cleanse, I have a bunch of old plastic oil bottles that I have cut open down to the neck and cap. Some on their sides, some on the flat. I can then place them under the filter. But before I take the filter off, I have a punch that I use to poke a hole in the filter, high side, then rotate the filter 180 degrees and poke another hole in it to let air in, letting most of the oil drain out in to the little catcher bottles. Then....

You won't get all the oil out, but if you hold the bottle up to the filter base before you spin it off, you will get most of it. You can also make funnels out of them.

That's why you're an associate of MacGyver and they didn't let me in the door.:)