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stevenf
10-05-2009, 12:12 AM
The book doesnt really teach you alot about specific pest , how to take care of them, or what chemicals to apply and where.
I would like to start offering pest control and fertilizer for 2010 but it wouldnt hurt anything if I could advertise them now. Where did you start, and how?

Ric
10-05-2009, 01:33 PM
The book doesnt really teach you alot about specific pest , how to take care of them, or what chemicals to apply and where.
I would like to start offering pest control and fertilizer for 2010 but it wouldnt hurt anything if I could advertise them now. Where did you start, and how?

Stevenf

It is called a LEARNING CURVE and only fools jump in the deep end of the pool. Look for Professional organization in your area and talk to you County Extension Agent about possible CEU classes. Some areas have Voc Ed for horticulture. But there is also LSU which is a land grant university and has many programs or classes in Horticulture. Education is not cheap and it takes sweat. No one can open your brain and pour in knowledge.

A.T.A.K
10-05-2009, 08:22 PM
Posted via Mobile DeviceI would find someone in your service area to work under. Let them show you the ropes. Ask around most operators would not mind the free help. As Ric said most countys have ag extensions but I have found them to be a joke. As the old saying goes those who don't succed teach. They may have all the right book answers but it does not allways help on insects and turf who can't read lol

whoopassonthebluegrass
10-05-2009, 09:17 PM
Since you're already working for yourself, learning under someone else is probably not much of an option. While that IS the ideal solution, the fact of the matter is that you can begin by offering very fundamental services (like fertilization only - or maybe with weed kill). That way you can focus on limited variables.

If you're intelligent and willing to study, you can come to know what you need. Just be honest with people and don't B.S. I did some of that early on and it backfired a time or two...

Ric
10-06-2009, 12:34 PM
Posted via Mobile DeviceI would find someone in your service area to work under. Let them show you the ropes. Ask around most operators would not mind the free help. As Ric said most countys have ag extensions but I have found them to be a joke. As the old saying goes those who don't succed teach. They may have all the right book answers but it does not allways help on insects and turf who can't read lol

Tim

First let me say you are one of the more knowledgeable CPOs here in Florida and general good old boy who doesn't mind helping anyone.

As per our conversation on the phone last week. We are both looking to train someone one on one just to have them help us pull hose every once and a while. I know you just lost one guy when he passed the test. You are about to lose my LS buddy who has been with you for almost the 3 required years here in Florida. So we are both looking for a part time helper and willing to train them in return. Heck I am about to turn 69 years young so they had better hurry if they want to take full advantage in my case. This might be an excellent opportunity for the right person to actually end up with a premium account list as well as a Florida CPO.

As per County Extension agents. My county is bad, but the county south of me has an excellent program and a real devoted Agent. So don't just take what is close, travel a little and take the best.

DA Quality Lawn & YS
10-06-2009, 01:24 PM
whoop is right, start out very basic, learn about the essential of turf fertilization, soil testing, etc and basic broadleaf weed control in turf. Then go ahead and offer your customers on a small scale. Do a great job for them, find out what really works and what doesn't work so good, then improve. You really do learn by doing, thats what I have found. For instance, I am already tweaking my program, timing the applications better so that my weed control hits the major broadleaf germination times where I live. I was a little off this season, will fix for next season.

shovelracer
10-06-2009, 02:17 PM
You really want to know how I learned. OK, but don't hang me for it. My first commercial application went like this.

Circa 1995-6 : I had no knowledge of chemicals, application rates, etc. My boss at the time who didn't have much more, let alone a license, loaded a pallet of weed n feed into the truck, followed by a spreader. I was handed a list and off I was sent. This happened a few more times before he stopped applications.

Since then I developed a desire to learn what the heck I was doing, and have invested thousands of dollars in classes, training, etc. I am now licensed and provide applications in a proper manner for my clients, but it didn't happen over night. First I got the license, but even then I only took accounts that where aware that I was still learning. I made it very clear that they where only getting a basic program. As time went on I learned more about advanced weed control and acquired the equipment to treat better. I still have a problem with the fact that I was pretty much handed a license when I knew as little as I did, but at the time it didn't concern me much, but of course does now.

gunsnroses
10-06-2009, 02:56 PM
read everything on this link
http://www.lsuagcenter.com/en/lawn_garden/

ArTurf
10-06-2009, 03:40 PM
I am in south Arkansas about 80 miles from Louisiana. There are not any schools I know of so I had to obtain my info from several sources bit by bit.
1st I obtained the study guides from the State that you must have to pass the test. It alone made little sense unless you already had some knowledge. The other sources I used were: county extension agent, golf course superintendent, Lesco dealer, internet, Lawnsite. No one had the whole answer spelled out I just had to sort out the bits & pieces. I treated my own lawn, family's & friends for a year to get practical experience. I would not advertise until you have everything in place, knowledge & equip. A $100 job gone bad can cost you $$ & damage you creditability. One thing I found out is you need to go big epuipment wise or stay home.

DA Quality Lawn & YS
10-06-2009, 04:12 PM
I am in south Arkansas about 80 miles from Louisiana. There are not any schools I know of so I had to obtain my info from several sources bit by bit.
1st I obtained the study guides from the State that you must have to pass the test. It alone made little sense unless you already had some knowledge. The other sources I used were: county extension agent, golf course superintendent, Lesco dealer, internet, Lawnsite. No one had the whole answer spelled out I just had to sort out the bits & pieces. I treated my own lawn, family's & friends for a year to get practical experience. I would not advertise until you have everything in place, knowledge & equip. A $100 job gone bad can cost you $$ & damage you creditability. One thing I found out is you need to go big epuipment wise or stay home.

I agree with this person - treat a few lawns for relatives or friends first (be licensed properly!) before you go big. I disagree though about needing huge equipment to start. This was my first season, a dozen customers, done with an electric shurflo backpack and lesco 80 lb spreader. Treat your customers like gold is the key thing, not big equipment expense right off. If you start getting the calls then upgrade your equipment as necessary.

phasthound
10-06-2009, 05:36 PM
You really want to know how I learned. OK, but don't hang me for it. My first commercial application went like this.

Circa 1995-6 : I had no knowledge of chemicals, application rates, etc. My boss at the time who didn't have much more, let alone a license, loaded a pallet of weed n feed into the truck, followed by a spreader. I was handed a list and off I was sent. This happened a few more times before he stopped applications.

Since then I developed a desire to learn what the heck I was doing, and have invested thousands of dollars in classes, training, etc. I am now licensed and provide applications in a proper manner for my clients, but it didn't happen over night. First I got the license, but even then I only took accounts that where aware that I was still learning. I made it very clear that they where only getting a basic program. As time went on I learned more about advanced weed control and acquired the equipment to treat better. I still have a problem with the fact that I was pretty much handed a license when I knew as little as I did, but at the time it didn't concern me much, but of course does now.

That's the way everyone in North Jersey learns! :)

I started in Bergen County the '70s by pulling hose for a tree spraying company. Some lawn guys complain about pulling hose, try pulling 300' of 3/4" hose around and spraying 2,000 gal at 700psi for 12 hours a day. All day long with pesticides raining down on us. No training, no licenses, no safety equipment, no sh*t!

The next company I worked for was good enough to send us to training classes offered by Rutgers. You get the fundamentals, but to get results that will set you apart takes the desire to learn and experience in the field.

Learning on your own will take time. If you can find an experienced person who really has the wisdom, knowledge and desire to teach......WOW that would be great. I'm sure spending a month with Ric would benefit you for a lifetime, as long as you're not a Democrat. :)

Otherwise, search for good info on warm season grasses. From my perspective, learn about proper irrigation, best seed types, and biological soil improvement and most other problems will go away.

txgrassguy
10-06-2009, 06:10 PM
With the wealth of knowledge just a few key strokes away on the internet you could sit at home and self study.
Once you have a base understanding of the required language associated with pesticide applications obtain the study guide(s) and go from there.
As far as actually acquiring the practical experience, do what some of the others have stated - find a mentor and stay with him/her until you are comfortable enough to properly bid/apply on your own.
The time line is entirely dependent upon your motivation and smarts.
I started on my third career (Turfgrass Agronomy) about twenty years ago. First as a laborer on a golf course where I volunteered for every task the Superintendent would allow me to participate. Went as far as I could go with the first course, went to a second where I did chemical applications and irrigation repair. Then off to Penn State.
Graduated and went into golf course construction, then maintenance as a Superintendent in my own right. Then progressed into self employment.
While I am aging, at 46 years old I still have some "legs" left and occasionally clients will still find me smiling when I am working so I'm going to stick around a bit longer.
I am almost finished with a Masters in Agronomy then it's back into the classroom but as an adjunct not as a student.

BocaChris
10-07-2009, 11:35 PM
Anyone with half a brain would take Ric up on an offer to work for him. Heck, id work for free if I could afford it just for his wealth of knowledge.

ted putnam
10-08-2009, 12:29 AM
Anyone with half a brain would take Ric up on an offer to work for him. Heck, id work for free if I could afford it just for his wealth of knowledge.

If I didn't have my license ,customer base, wife and family here, I'd move to Florida and be his "Lawn *****".:laugh: Seriously though, it'd be a sweet deal for a single guy with no ties to where he is at this point in time.

Whitey4
10-09-2009, 10:48 PM
With the wealth of knowledge just a few key strokes away on the internet you could sit at home and self study.
Once you have a base understanding of the required language associated with pesticide applications obtain the study guide(s) and go from there.
As far as actually acquiring the practical experience, do what some of the others have stated - find a mentor and stay with him/her until you are comfortable enough to properly bid/apply on your own.
The time line is entirely dependent upon your motivation and smarts.
I started on my third career (Turfgrass Agronomy) about twenty years ago. First as a laborer on a golf course where I volunteered for every task the Superintendent would allow me to participate. Went as far as I could go with the first course, went to a second where I did chemical applications and irrigation repair. Then off to Penn State.
Graduated and went into golf course construction, then maintenance as a Superintendent in my own right. Then progressed into self employment.
While I am aging, at 46 years old I still have some "legs" left and occasionally clients will still find me smiling when I am working so I'm going to stick around a bit longer.
I am almost finished with a Masters in Agronomy then it's back into the classroom but as an adjunct not as a student.

Soild opinion here, IMO.

I took a class, passed the test, joined my local LCO association, go to meetings they sponsor with expert guest speakers, and study my ass off on line. In no short measure, I learned plenty from the folks in this forum as well. I'm still learning.... got my butt kicked by fungus problems this year, and that was after my first year, when ALL my lawns looked freakin awesome. I thought I had it all figured out. Got humbled in year 2. Trying to figure out what organic apps will help, and got some advice on that in this forum too.

I have much still to learn, but the bascis can be gotten the way I did it. Still, I'd like to find a really good turf course this winter to learn more. The more you try to learn, the more you will learn. More time and study reduces the learning curve. The one constant that can't be changed is experience.

ted putnam
10-09-2009, 11:40 PM
[QUOTE=Whitey4;3222852].... got my butt kicked by fungus problems this year, and that was after my first year, when ALL my lawns looked freakin awesome. I thought I had it all figured out. Got humbled in year 2.


Whitey, Mother Nature likes to throw you a curve ball every once in awhile just to keep you on your toes. 3 yrs ago I had an Army worm outbreak that was terrible. I had one lawn that had them so bad that they ran out of green grass to eat and crawled across concrete and fell into the pool looking for more. The entire bottom of the pool was covered in about 2 inches of Army worms. My phone was ringing off the hook for service calls while still trying to maintain my regular schedule. My point is, sometimes it has nothing to do with what you do or how you do it, it's simply beyond your control.

Ric
10-11-2009, 01:50 AM
Anyone with half a brain would take Ric up on an offer to work for him. Heck, id work for free if I could afford it just for his wealth of knowledge.

Chris

Both Tim in the Orlando area and I just south of you are not looking for a full time guy. A couple days a month is all we are asking for. Keep your present job or business. Neither one of us are asking for any kind of payment. By the same token we are not offering to pay you with money, only knowledge. The big reward for both of us is when you pass the Certification test. At my age a person could walk into a real sweet deal in a few years. Statistically I have about 6 years left.

BocaChris
10-11-2009, 04:05 PM
Ric,
Actually I just started working for a new company starting my 3 years required to take the CPO certification test. But would definitely enjoy somehow "working" with you or even sitting down for a couple drinks to learn some from you. You have my utmost respect with your knowledge of this business.

Ric
10-11-2009, 07:58 PM
Ric,
Actually I just started working for a new company starting my 3 years required to take the CPO certification test. But would definitely enjoy somehow "working" with you or even sitting down for a couple drinks to learn some from you. You have my utmost respect with your knowledge of this business.

Chris

I am a cheap date and get drunk on two beers. So you wouldn't get much info over beers. I might have a Diet Pepsi while you have a beer. State law is such that you can only work for one company at a time. To work with me for free would still be considered MOONLIGHTING by the state and might not be appreciated by your present employer. When you worked for CSX you were under a different License and could have legally moonlighted. I try my best to stay with the law.

BocaChris
10-11-2009, 09:32 PM
Lol Ric, I dont drink much either. Except today watching the Bucs game but thats beyond the point. Im a coffee addict myself. I completely agree with you, no need to piss off the state. Oh yeah, CSX no longer does work at my previous job, that is an In-House Private HOA now. It would be awesome to meet up with you at some point.

Ric
10-12-2009, 12:31 PM
Chris

Many years ago I was maintenance super of the Boca Grande Club. Same thing happen and the developer left and they became a HOA. They even offered me the same job at 1/2 the pay. One lesson I learned in Boca Grande is the Filth Rich are cheap.

Which one of my competitors are working for???

BocaChris
10-12-2009, 12:58 PM
Ric
I totally hear you there, multi millionairs you cant get a penny out of. Im working for MainScape. Im the only spray tech from ruskin to port charlotte
Posted via Mobile Device

Ric
10-12-2009, 04:33 PM
Ric
I totally hear you there, multi millionairs you cant get a penny out of. Im working for MainScape. Im the only spray tech from ruskin to port charlotte
Posted via Mobile Device

Chris

To be honest I have never heard of them. That is a big area. I am the only spray guy from PGI to PGI for my company.

BTW I see you are using a cell phone to post. I use a netbook and piggyback off thousands of open routers.

BocaChris
10-12-2009, 06:40 PM
Ric
They have only been in FL for about 3 or 4 years now. They dont have any individual homes all Full Service properties (homes and common areas) or just common areas. I wish I could have a laptop with me, but I dont think they approve of them unless provided by the company. My cell phone is like a fossil, no 3G and a tiny screen...

Johnagain
10-12-2009, 07:00 PM
Can anyone verify this?
I just recieved a letter from Bill Phagan consulting Inc. and he states that it is no longer required to work under someone else for 3 years to get your license for applying pesticides. Is this true? I haven't found anything out about it either way. I don't apply pesticides but if this is now true I might be interested in learning.

Ric
10-12-2009, 07:25 PM
Can anyone verify this?
I just recieved a letter from Bill Phagan consulting Inc. and he states that it is no longer required to work under someone else for 3 years to get your license for applying pesticides. Is this true? I haven't found anything out about it either way. I don't apply pesticides but if this is now true I might be interested in learning.

Johnagain

This is Partly True and only with the Limited Ornamental License or better known as the Roundup License. Since I have said it to his face I will say it in Public, Bill Phagan is a scam artist. Not unlike Obama he is a great talker but delivers very little at a very high price.

Go to your County Extension Office. They offer the same thing at faction of the cost Bill Phagan charges. Bill and his buddy Bob Kessler were selling a lawn hand book which was a C & P off the UF Website. Copyrights didn't apply because UF is a Land Grant University and any information from them is for public knowledge. I got sucker into one of their seminars years ago. But I realized the material was straight from UF and free to anyone.

In Edit

Bill Phagan used to post here at LS many many years ago. Not me but other members ran him off very quickly. LS has changed from 10 years ago and I am not sure he would be run off today.

A.T.A.K
10-12-2009, 10:44 PM
LOL both make me laugh. Thanks for the kind words Ric. Weird how we offer our program but no response. I just hope we get more people in our area who just want to do the job correctly. It kills me day after day seeing these companies who give the full 5 days in house training. Yards are burnt all throuh out our area.
Posted via Mobile Device

grassman177
10-12-2009, 11:29 PM
so i went to college about turf care, other than that i never stop reading and researching and trial and error and you get the idea.

Ric
10-13-2009, 10:52 AM
LOL both make me laugh. Thanks for the kind words Ric. Weird how we offer our program but no response. I just hope we get more people in our area who just want to do the job correctly. It kills me day after day seeing these companies who give the full 5 days in house training. Yards are burnt all throuh out our area.
Posted via Mobile Device

Tim

Maybe we should be more like Bill & Bob show and hype it up charging big bucks and deliver very little. But the reason we are getting no takers is because Lawn Boys can't think past their next 12 pack of Dime bag. But we might try doing the Ric & Tim show with all the hype and actually educate some people. I was a CEU Provider but I am not current.

5 days training is the requirement by state. But the state doesn't mandate what that training is, therefore it is left up to the individual CPOIC. Now if I am going to turn someone lose to spray under my license, You better believe they are going to be well trained. I don't need the hassle or the insurance claims and I darn sure don't want to loose my Certs.

A.T.A.K
10-13-2009, 07:16 PM
Ric not a bad Idea. I am still current as a ceu provider you may be onto something offer classes a couple times a year. Charge a couple hundred bucks for a day or 2 of training. Hard to belive we were offering it for free. Call me tomorrow or somtime let's talk it may be worth while.
Posted via Mobile Device

A.T.A.K
10-13-2009, 10:45 PM
Let the Ric & Tim show begin
Posted via Mobile Device

Johnagain
10-13-2009, 11:06 PM
Thanks Ric for the info on Bill Phagan. I knew his classes were expensive for what was offered, but the way he mentioned that you no longer needed 3 years in under someone licensed is what confused me.

Johnagain
10-13-2009, 11:09 PM
Thanks again Tim for calling me back. I'll get with you at the end of the month and set something up for early November.

ArizPestWeed
10-14-2009, 12:36 AM
Hey Dic-Less , why do you need to broadcast personal .
Okay , so you may have a friend or 2 , you need to show off ?
:laugh:


Tim

First let me say you are one of the more knowledgeable CPOs here in Florida and general good old boy who doesn't mind helping anyone.

As per our conversation on the phone last week. We are both looking to train someone one on one just to have them help us pull hose every once and a while. I know you just lost one guy when he passed the test. You are about to lose my LS buddy who has been with you for almost the 3 required years here in Florida. So we are both looking for a part time helper and willing to train them in return. Heck I am about to turn 69 years young so they had better hurry if they want to take full advantage in my case. This might be an excellent opportunity for the right person to actually end up with a premium account list as well as a Florida CPO.

As per County Extension agents. My county is bad, but the county south of me has an excellent program and a real devoted Agent. So don't just take what is close, travel a little and take the best.

A.T.A.K
10-14-2009, 12:50 AM
Paul why so mean to Ric he is a good guy. By the way how are you have not heard from you in a while. You still on IPCO have not been there in a long time
Posted via Mobile Device

Ric
10-14-2009, 11:25 AM
Ric not a bad Idea. I am still current as a ceu provider you may be onto something offer classes a couple times a year. Charge a couple hundred bucks for a day or 2 of training. Hard to belive we were offering it for free. Call me tomorrow or somtime let's talk it may be worth while.
Posted via Mobile Device

Tim

Glad you called me last night. I think giving classes might be a real up for me since it has been many years since I taught in college. When you teach you learn and I have to admit to becoming a little stale.

Because you are more centrally located in the Orlando area I think your area is a better location. The fact you have access to a good Nursery makes it even better. Talking about pictures of plants and having a selections of plants, makes all the difference in the level of understanding. As a former CEU Provider (BTW I am still on the list but not current with a program) Field training is 1/2 the credit time of class room but worth twice classroom time.

Marketing to the masses becomes our only problem and I agree we should concentrate on Plants and Trees since there is so little information on them in one place. Over the top weed control, Fert, Insect and Fungus of plants would appeal to everyone from Nursery Growers to Limited Pesticide License and even homeowners. Hurricane Charlie might of blown my nursery away but Charlie couldn't take my years of experience away. I am very curious as to how many people reading here would be interested.


PS don't worry about Air Head being mean, If he wasn't I would think something was wrong. It is a thing we just do to each other.

A.T.A.K
10-14-2009, 02:22 PM
Yes I am a little rusty myself but this could be fun. I enjoyed doing this for pest insurance companies a few years back when I did consulting for them. This will reach a good many lco's in Florida which will put them on the right track. May even entertain the idea of doing termite, pest control, aquatic and public health (mosquito). We will see where it takes us after a few classes. Just think we were giving this away free plus time in for their state certs. I may still offer that service for a select few.
Posted via Mobile Device

ted putnam
10-14-2009, 09:55 PM
I'll have to admit, it could be something that is lucrative for you guys down there being that your state is #1 difficult to obtain a license in, #2 your state is so densely populated and #3 so many folks with $$$(as far as Clentele.) Of course Ric will have to brush up on his social skills a little and start buttering people up a little instead of rubbing their fur the wrong way.:laugh::laugh: especially when it comes to dealing with state officials but all in all I think a consulting/teaching platform might be a good business idea for your area. Good Luck!

rob7233
10-15-2009, 07:28 AM
Yes I am a little rusty myself but this could be fun. I enjoyed doing this for pest insurance companies a few years back when I did consulting for them. This will reach a good many lco's in Florida which will put them on the right track. May even entertain the idea of doing termite, pest control, aquatic and public health (mosquito). We will see where it takes us after a few classes. Just think we were giving this away free plus time in for their state certs. I may still offer that service for a select few.
Posted via Mobile Device

Hey, Could any of you PM me with the info on your classes you might offer. I'll be the first to sign up! :weightlifter:

Ric
10-15-2009, 12:06 PM
I'll have to admit, it could be something that is lucrative for you guys down there being that your state is #1 difficult to obtain a license in, #2 your state is so densely populated and #3 so many folks with $$$(as far as Clentele.) Of course Ric will have to brush up on his social skills a little and start buttering people up a little instead of rubbing their fur the wrong way.:laugh::laugh: especially when it comes to dealing with state officials but all in all I think a consulting/teaching platform might be a good business idea for your area. Good Luck!

Ted

Just FYI Once Ric had his degree he still needed to work under a CPO for one year to sit for the tests. Ric Hired a CPO and started his own Company. That CPO was the Wife of the Ag Inspector who worked Ric's area. BTW Ric got inspected more than any other company during that time. But that helped Ric be a great CPO and really learn the Law.

BTW In person Ric will still ding you, But at Least you will hear the inflexion in his voice and see the smile on his face and get a laugh out of it.


Rob

There are many books out there about plants, But none of them are complete IMHO. Therefore I have taken my copy of "FLORIDA LANDSCAPE PLANTS" By Watkins & Sheehan and marked the heck out of it with info from other books and personal experience. That book is my bible. I have that book marked in the Following way for hundreds of plants and would pass that information on to you.

Shape or form

Approx Mature Height

Growth Rate

Texture

Native Habitat

Salt Tolerance

Light Requirements

Water Requirements

Temperature Range

Flower Color

Flowering Season

Landscape use

Insect pressure

Fungus pressure.

Fertilizer Needs

Propagation

Over the top weed control herbicides.


But right now I am more interested in now many people would sign up to take classes. Unless we can get a favorable response there is no way I am going to get motivated to give a class. Money is not my motivation, right now I just broke it off with a GF and have the time and interest. But if I hook up with a hottie you may be S.O.L.

PM Tim with your contact information and we will get back to you. At some point I will contact Sean Adams because he has worked with me in the past on giving classes. But to be honest the interest level was very low.

rob7233
10-15-2009, 03:34 PM
Thanks, I already have that one. The one book that I think all FL LCO's should read is: Your Florida Landscape by Black & Ruppert. It's another UF book and also the BMP manual by the Green Industry. The problem is trying to educate to customer base in buying into this, when they barely want to pay decently for some basic service. Do you have that kind of issue with providing IPM as a program?

Ric
10-15-2009, 07:24 PM
Thanks, I already have that one. The one book that I think all FL LCO's should read is: Your Florida Landscape by Black & Ruppert. It's another UF book and also the BMP manual by the Green Industry. The problem is trying to educate to customer base in buying into this, when they barely want to pay decently for some basic service. Do you have that kind of issue with providing IPM as a program?

Rob

Then you know "FLA LANDSCAPE PLANTS" is a great book but lacks certain facts. It doesn't have descent pictures for ID. "FLORIDA MY EDEN" has great pictures but little facts. Etc Etc.

"FLA LANDSCAPE" and "FLA. LAWN HANDBOOK" Both written by Rupper & Black are a must read if you want to be a professional. They also have written many other books about native plants and Trees. All of these can be purchased from University Press www.upf.com or Amazon at a lower price than University Press.

IPM no problem, But. My take on IPM is you must visit the property pretty regular to be effective. Lawn cutters with the knowledge are the best to offer this service. As a pest control provider My customers can't afford to pay me to visit there property that often and I must use BMP (Best Management Practices). But I do some consulting work for agriculture and IPM is the only economical way to turn a profit. I don't do the inspections unless there is a unknown by the guy who does. Then I sometimes must call in help.

Each individual must decide what works best for there Business model and IPM certainly is a good method for many. Part of IPM IMHO is to do preventative treatment before some known pest pressures are even visible.