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White Gardens
10-07-2009, 07:58 AM
So I'm doing the large paver project in my thread.

With all the rain we've been getting, and is in the forecast, I've got a question.

As soon as the sidewalk is removed, I'm going to get the grading done and start laying my crushed gravel base. I think I'm going to use geo-fabric as a barrier between the fill and the existing dirt.

The question is, will I have any issues if I lay the base for the whole 245 feet and it gets rained on.

I wouldn't think it's an issue, but I didn't know if any of you guys have dealt with this before.

Also, one more question.

What do you guys use for temporary restraints to hold back the fill where I need to raise the dirt around it. A couple of spots are low, so I'm trying to figure the best way to raise it. One section is a circle in the middle of the sidewalk, and in the center will be an annual bed.

Thanks for all your guys help. I'm not a full time hardscaper, but I have been around it enough working for others, and done a few smaller projects that I'm confident in my work.

I just need a little real world advice from you full time guys.

Thanks.

N. White.

White Gardens
10-10-2009, 08:06 PM
Bump it up.

Could really use some help. We've had 3 inches of rain in the pas 1.5 weeks and more in the forecast. I just want to make sure my base won't get ruined before the pavers are in.

Thanks.....

Stone Creations
10-10-2009, 08:50 PM
Why are you installing and leveling base then walking away from it...if you feel you cant bang out 245 ft in a day.. then dont do nothing till your ready...I lay base, grade, install pavers as I go..as far as restraining the base, are you gonna level exsiting dirt up to pavers?..if so then install base, pavers, and a cement wash to restrain your walk..then topsoil over that..hope this helps..

White Gardens
10-10-2009, 09:16 PM
I'm not saying I'm walking away from it as soon as it's laid. I just think it's going to take 3-4 days to lay, and if it rains in those days, am I O.K.

I understand as a solo op with a couple of helpers that I can't bust it out in one day. Not only that but there will be time involve with my intersections of walk and the circle bed in the walk.

9 times out of ten, I wouldn't worry about it, but with the weather we've been having, I can't count on anything regardless of how fast I normally work. I'm hedging my bets at this point that I'll work around the rain and the early freezes we are experiencing and still get done in reasonable time before the first snow flies.

1.) do I lay out the base and pavers for one half and then the other half, or

2.) do I lay the entire base, risking some sort of rain on it before bedding sand and pavers are laid. I would assume that my base, after compaction, will be quite O.K. if it gets rained on. But, I wanted some real world opinions on this this to make sure I'm correct.

Thanks.

Stone Creations
10-10-2009, 11:03 PM
Well your using a bedding sand ?ok .. yes you can lay your base down a few days ahead of time and compact to a minimum 4"..then when your ready to do the pavers screed your bedding sand as you go...

Summit L & D
10-10-2009, 11:58 PM
I think you should be fine as long as the fines don't wash out of the base. Definitely screed your sand as you go, and to further that, make sure the sand you get from your supplier stays dry. Use geo textile for sure. You need to have at least 6" of solid base extending out from the edge of your pavers, in the areas that you have to raise, just take the base a little wider (about 1' past the edge). Once you're done laying the pavers you can dig out the excess base and fill in with topsoil to the regular 6".

White Gardens
10-11-2009, 01:12 AM
Hey thanks guys.

My base is going to extend a couple of inches on each side of the sidewalk anyway, and after looking at recent pics I took, the mini seems to be packing down the soil good before I cut out the area for the base.

The only spot I see I might have issues with is the center annual bed. It's in the middle of the last pic in this post. http://www.lawnsite.com/showpost.php?p=3224506&postcount=190

I still think that I can pack the soil down enough to hold my base for the sidewalk around that bed. I'm contemplating putting geo-grid between my base and bedding sand along with the geo-fabric under the base.

Thanks,

GMTA
10-11-2009, 03:55 PM
So I'm doing the large paver project in my thread.

The question is, will I have any issues if I lay the base for the whole 245 feet and it gets rained on.

I wouldn't think it's an issue, but I didn't know if any of you guys have dealt with this before.

Also, one more question.

What do you guys use for temporary restraints to hold back the fill where I need to raise the dirt around it. A couple of spots are low, so I'm trying to figure the best way to raise it. One section is a circle in the middle of the sidewalk, and in the center will be an annual bed.



1) Depends on how much rain you get. Why not just tarp it to prevent the problem if your expecting rain?

2) If your low in that area just build up the base and tapper it off to hold the base in, then removed later and replace with soil. Why is the walk going to be so high? If you need more restraint height for base stone then you will have like 3.5" more height to the walk due to the sand and pavers. Seems odd to me that your walkway is going to be constructed this high in comparison to the soil or grass.

Summit L & D
10-11-2009, 04:01 PM
I wouldn't put grid between your base and sand. That's asking for trouble, not to mention pointless.

GMTA
10-11-2009, 04:18 PM
I wouldn't put grid between your base and sand. That's asking for trouble, not to mention pointless.

If your referring to geotextile fabric when you say grid, it is not pointless because there is a point to doing it. Some guys do this to prevent the aggregate and sub grade soils from intermixing, which in turn would create more base stability/reduction in settling when compacted correctly. Also they believe using it as a separation between base product and sand would prevent washout or intermixing while allowing water to drain through. So there is a point, but it ultimately comes down to the choice of using it or not.

White Gardens
10-11-2009, 04:26 PM
1) Depends on how much rain you get. Why not just tarp it to prevent the problem if your expecting rain?

2) If your low in that area just build up the base and tapper it off to hold the base in, then removed later and replace with soil. Why is the walk going to be so high? If you need more restraint height for base stone then you will have like 3.5" more height to the walk due to the sand and pavers. Seems odd to me that your walkway is going to be constructed this high in comparison to the soil or grass.

I might tarp it, but I doubt that I need to. There is only one area and that is the annual circle bed that I might need to restrain the dirt when installing the base. I think it's the last pic in the link I posted above. If you look down the run the center area had a circle bed. The rest of the sidewalk will be done generally following the natural grade, with the occasional high or low spot.

I wouldn't put grid between your base and sand. That's asking for trouble, not to mention pointless.

Throughout 90% of it, yes. I was thinking of using the grid in the section of sidewalk with the annual bed in the center. I want as much support as possible in that area as it will be worked every spring. I don't want my bedding sand eroding on the edges.

If your referring to geotextile fabric when you say grid, it is not pointless because there is a point to doing it. Some guys do this to prevent the aggregate and sub grade soils from intermixing, which in turn would create more base stability/reduction in settling when compacted correctly. So there is a point, but it ultimately comes down to the choice of using it or not.

I will be using the geo-textile fabric as a barrier between my fill and sub-grade. I'm afraid of the two zones migrating over time.

shovelracer
10-11-2009, 04:44 PM
Ive always used geotex between subgrade and base. i've recently started also using it between base and bedding sand. I do it for added insurance. Because this area gets a lot of freeze and thaw I've also been toying with the idea of taking the geotex under the bedding sand and wrapping it over the edge restraint. This way if there is any warpage or heaving of the restraint the bedding sand cant wash under the restraint and cause sinkage. As for the original question: if you get your base down and compacted it wont hold much water. We ran into this just last week. The compacted base just drained off and we were able to continue installing lifts as soon as the surface water drained away.

White Gardens
10-11-2009, 04:49 PM
The compacted base just drained off and we were able to continue installing lifts as soon as the surface water drained away.

Thanks, that was what I figured. If it's compacted correctly it should just shed water away.

I need the area to dry out still. It sucks to have a machine on-site that isn't running. I tried a little dirt work today for about 5 minutes and gave up.