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rcreech
10-15-2009, 10:06 PM
If you live in MI, IN, OH, KY, etc you need to check into this.

I have been treating for Emerald Ash Borer now for a year and it is a big $$$$$ maker.

I am going to be putting a lot of effort into it this winter and have some serious money to make!

Went to a seminar today and it has me pumped!!!!! We need to be educating our clients and let them know how important this application is.

Contact Arbor Jet and they can get you all the details you need for TreeAge.

It is very easy to do...and very little overhead and there are a ton of trees with very few people treating them!

That is a great combination to any good add on service!

grandview (2006)
10-15-2009, 10:18 PM
I'm looking into Arborjet myself for next yr

starry night
10-15-2009, 10:19 PM
The question is: can you treat a tree with TreeAge once for as cheap as I can do the same tree for two or three years with imidacloprid drench? (The only advantage I have read about with TreeAge is that it is effective for two or three years. Not more effective just effective longer.)

mdlwn1
10-15-2009, 10:24 PM
I'm no expert...but i've only seen them attack unhealthy trees, especially ones that have been planted improperly..(which is most of them). Healthy trees around here can fend off emeralds no issue.

grandview (2006)
10-15-2009, 10:24 PM
The question is: can you treat a tree with TreeAge once for as cheap as I can do the same tree for two or three years with imidacloprid drench? (The only advantage I have read about with TreeAge is that it is effective for two or three years. Not more effective just effective longer.)

Well that keeps them coming back for more.

FdLLawnMan
10-15-2009, 10:24 PM
The question is: can you treat a tree with TreeAge once for as cheap as I can do the same tree for two or three years with imidacloprid drench? (The only advantage I have read about with TreeAge is that it is effective for two or three years. Not more effective just effective longer.)

TreeAge is near 100% effective while the Imidacloprid is only 90% effective in some cases and must be done every year. TreeAge can be performed every 2 to 3 years after treating for 2 years. TreeAge is the hands down way to go and the ArborJet system is easy to use.

starry night
10-15-2009, 10:36 PM
TreeAge is near 100% effective while the Imidacloprid is only 90% effective in some cases and must be done every year. TreeAge can be performed every 2 to 3 years after treating for 2 years. TreeAge is the hands down way to go and the ArborJet system is easy to use.

You may be right about the percentages but I still refer to my ability to sell the drench prices with many customers who won't go for the TreeAge price. And for what it is worth, I know one entomologist who questions the safety of poking holes in trees repeatedly (albeit very small holes with TreeAge.)

I don't have all the answers; I'm just adding to this good subject discussion.

starry night
10-15-2009, 10:41 PM
I'm no expert...but i've only seen them attack unhealthy trees, especially ones that have been planted improperly..(which is most of them). Healthy trees around here can fend off emeralds no issue.

Hmmmm. Not sure about your information. We ARE talking about Emerald Ash Borer here not just your regular ash borer? According to my information, the danger in the spread of EAB is that they DO attack healthy trees unlike the regular borer we've had for years. And I can vouch for this. We have them in my city.

rcreech
10-15-2009, 10:43 PM
I'm no expert...but i've only seen them attack unhealthy trees, especially ones that have been planted improperly..(which is most of them). Healthy trees around here can fend off emeralds no issue.

Not true!~

Better do some checking on that one!

rcreech
10-15-2009, 10:47 PM
TreeAge is near 100% effective while the Imidacloprid is only 90% effective in some cases and must be done every year. TreeAge can be performed every 2 to 3 years after treating for 2 years. TreeAge is the hands down way to go and the ArborJet system is easy to use.

Exactly Mike~!

Are you using TreeAge yet?

There is no other product on the market with 2-3 years efficacy and nothing is better then 99%.

This product and service sells itself.

The cost is about the same...and injections are much better then drenching.

With injections...it gets in the tree much quicked and it doesn't get tied up.

grandview (2006)
10-15-2009, 11:12 PM
http://www.ojibway.ca/eab_galleries.jpg
http://www.entomology.wisc.edu/emeraldashborer/images/EABashHeavyDecline2.jpg

treemonkey
10-15-2009, 11:32 PM
Excellent advice rcreech. With 20/20 hindsight, I can tell you that you need to figure out a way to get in the general public's face about the availability of your services. I don't know why (there's been lots of newspaper coverage), but people just seem oblivious to the fact that they can save their home trees.

Once established, the bug moves like wildfire. Good fortunes to you!

ICT Bill
10-15-2009, 11:50 PM
Peter Wilde who started the company is the bomb, I mean, a great guy who is really smart. You can trust him and his company to provide a very effective treatments as many cities have found out. Effective and cost effective

I hear "merit as a soil drench" yeah but it takes 18 months to be effective, by then the tree is toast.

I am not affliated in any way but know Peter, disclaimer

Florida Gardener
10-16-2009, 12:06 AM
I want to start doing injections for Lethal Yellow(palm disorder) down here in Florida. I am taking Arboriculture in my Hort. program and once i finish the class i can take the exam and be certified. I want to start offering injections as a service b/c i know not a lot of LCO's are doing it around here, mainly tree companies. We also have a problem with borers that attack the Slash Pines down here(and we have like a bajillion slash pines down here). It is really easy money from what it seems like.

FdLLawnMan
10-16-2009, 09:15 AM
Rodney

I used the ArborJet this year for the first time on River Birches with iron chlorosis. It is very easy to use. I am like you, I am going to aggressively push the injection this year. I plan on doing something that has been proven to work and not something that might work.

phasthound
10-16-2009, 09:26 AM
I'm no expert...but i've only seen them attack unhealthy trees, especially ones that have been planted improperly..(which is most of them). Healthy trees around here can fend off emeralds no issue.

I think you have your bugs mixed up. EAB is wiping out ash trees like crazy. They are just starting to reach NJ.
Go here for better info.
http://www.emeraldashborer.info/index.cfm
Does it only attack dying or stressed trees?
Healthy ash trees are also susceptible, although beetles may prefer to lay eggs or feed on stressed trees. When EAB populations are high, small trees may die within 1-2 years of becoming infested and large trees can be killed in 3-4 years

Think Green
10-16-2009, 08:03 PM
RC,
8 years ago, I sat through a 2 day seminar in Memphis, TN. with a supplier for Mauget's Systems. Immicide, Injecticide B, Metasystox-R, Phosfites,etc. These guru's are there to pump you up and make a buck for their back pockets. I am interested in knowing how you and everyone else is going to get into the publics face with this information. I know that some state's have endured urban streetside problems with the ELB, EAB,DED, Verticiluim, Phytothora, Palm Yellows,Peach X. Tree preservation societies and advocacy groups are and have been trying to save shade trees along these critical city zones. The bottom line is getting all onto the bandwagon and providing them with proof and the evidence they need. The other factor is who will pay for tree preservation. I have spent several thousand dollars in trying to educate my area over the past years, and I literally had to give it up for the cost factors and unnoticing public opinions. Since trees are our only natural source for shade and oxygen, it seems that no one really wants to take the time to observe what is going on, and why it is going on. To the average Joe, tree sickness is something that just happens and then it dies. Cut it down!!!!!
I am for your efforts and your zeal, so don't get me wrong. I haven't thrown the injection to the fire as of present time, I have ceased in sales until the right time again. Every market takes a slump and then it will revive.!!!
P.M. me on what you have come up with on educating the public!!
God Bless!

mdlwn1
10-16-2009, 08:13 PM
I think you have your bugs mixed up. EAB is wiping out ash trees like crazy. They are just starting to reach NJ.
Go here for better info.
http://www.emeraldashborer.info/index.cfm
Does it only attack dying or stressed trees?
Healthy ash trees are also susceptible, although beetles may prefer to lay eggs or feed on stressed trees. When EAB populations are high, small trees may die within 1-2 years of becoming infested and large trees can be killed in 3-4 years

Like I said....Im no expert..just going off what I have observed. I have done much work in Northern NJ (in the long horn quarantine zone)and western Long Island. The trees I have seen them attack are exactly as shown in the posting in this thread....planted poorly...mulched poorly...and destined to fail anyway.

LIBERTYLANDSCAPING
10-16-2009, 08:44 PM
RC,
8 years ago, I sat through a 2 day seminar in Memphis, TN. with a supplier for Mauget's Systems. Immicide, Injecticide B, Metasystox-R, Phosfites,etc. These guru's are there to pump you up and make a buck for their back pockets. I am interested in knowing how you and everyone else is going to get into the publics face with this information. I know that some state's have endured urban streetside problems with the ELB, EAB,DED, Verticiluim, Phytothora, Palm Yellows,Peach X. Tree preservation societies and advocacy groups are and have been trying to save shade trees along these critical city zones. The bottom line is getting all onto the bandwagon and providing them with proof and the evidence they need. The other factor is who will pay for tree preservation. I have spent several thousand dollars in trying to educate my area over the past years, and I literally had to give it up for the cost factors and unnoticing public opinions. Since trees are our only natural source for shade and oxygen, it seems that no one really wants to take the time to observe what is going on, and why it is going on. To the average Joe, tree sickness is something that just happens and then it dies. Cut it down!!!!!
I am for your efforts and your zeal, so don't get me wrong. I haven't thrown the injection to the fire as of present time, I have ceased in sales until the right time again. Every market takes a slump and then it will revive.!!!
P.M. me on what you have come up with on educating the public!!
God Bless!


:clapping::clapping:
Well said!

I feel the same way! I don't even look hard & notice issues w/ tress everyday & have had a hard time selling this as well. The general public knows little about this & until they have experienced their beloved tree die & have to be removed, they could care less.

I have 2 dozen Ash trees at a shopping center that are now hosting an EAB infestation. I begged, pleaded & warned the property manager about this for the last 3 years, before the trees were infested & now some of them are showing dieback at the tops. Property manager now says who cares, they'll just cut them all down. (Property manager is from Detroit area which is like ground zero for EAB)

However, if someone has a great way for selling these, without having to pay for a media blitz explaining what is is & why people need it I'd love to here their methods as well:)

phasthound
10-16-2009, 09:00 PM
I've always felt is weird how so much time, effort & money is spent on lawn care as opposed to tree preservation. No matter what happens to a lawn, it can easily be replaced. Trees seem to have no value, until they are gone. :cry:

phasthound
10-16-2009, 09:05 PM
Like I said....Im no expert..just going off what I have observed. I have done much work in Northern NJ (in the long horn quarantine zone)and western Long Island. The trees I have seen them attack are exactly as shown in the posting in this thread....planted poorly...mulched poorly...and destined to fail anyway.

I understand what you're saying about improperly planted trees being destined to die. However EAB has killed millions of ash trees in healthy forest ecosystems. EAB is an invasive pest and native ash trees have no defense against it.

rcreech
10-16-2009, 10:02 PM
I sent out a newsletter to all my clients and got a great response.

I had 1 customer with 7 trees over 24". Ash trees were the ONLY large trees in their lawn. That was a serious payday!!!!!!!

If you tell people they are going to lose their trees they listen.

Why not treat a 30" tree????

You can treat a 30" tree for 10 years for the cost of removing it AND you still get to keep the tree.

The smaller the tree the longer you can treat it.

Large trees are hard to replace!!!!!

I am going to continue servicing my clients but going to focus on the smaller cities and villages.

Data shows that we can treat the trees MUCH cheaper then removing them in almost every case!

Think Green
10-17-2009, 12:30 AM
RC,
I highly agree with the research, and I have seen insects fall off maples and tulips with injections of Bidrin. I have injected trees with Immicide as indicated for control of up to 3 years of residual protection. I feel that if you are in a hot zone, with immediate publicity, then jumping on the situation will prove profitable as long as the public stays aware of the problems. The cost of prevention is worth the expense compared to removal or destruction caused by unstable trees in certain areas. I sympathize with the Northern areas where these insect pests are proving to be costly in deaths of 1,000's of forest and urban trees. The profits that can be made during a time of disaster is only common, and I have done as most in capitalizing off of the problem. It is no different than the Doctor's coming to the South capitalizing on the disorder's of our poor sick farmer's.
Getting back on topic--Our area seems to have been selected for leaf disorder's, root rot disorders, compaction of rootzones, poor growing conditions, unfavorable site and planting situations. This is of no secret to the seasoned landscaper and disease control applicator. . This is prime for insect attacks and sudden death of our urban trees. The funny thing for us is when---Defoliants are sprayed around here on the cotton. Trees for miles in many zones emmulate signs of illness and defoliation caused by root disorders and severe fungus..!!!!!!
I once posted on other forums, that most cases of tree care practices for me, was when a customer's tree has endured so much that by the time the customer calls, it is too late. My best wishes go to you in your venture. The systems are effective if the education is accepted with an open mind. We have made several thousand dollars over the years in insect control using the Mauget systems, so please understand that I am in no way discrediting injection as a felonious marketing scheme. They really work!!!!
It takes alot of foot work and phone calls to really educate the public. I have done two newspaper articles on such insect problems as our Pine Bark Beetles, and round head borer's. In this article, which is done for free when introducing something new to a area, seemed to draw some of the elderly citizens, HOA, and the gated community estates.. However, for us it was just another newspaper that made it to the fireplace during the winter or to let the dog poop on. I have done small community demonstrations at our public library on earth day---Don't Laugh!!! The public wasn't impressed at all. Most people want to see results- FAST! It was hard for me to sell them on something that could be seen in days, weeks,months.
It depends on the consumer and what they consider to be worthy of saving.!!!

I am still an advocate of--------"It takes longer to regrow a tree than most people will live to see at maturity" so I don't like to cut down oaks, hickories unless there is no hope for them. Most times they are on there way out anyway. Other times it is structural problems or from storm damage.