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93Chevy
10-17-2009, 05:52 PM
Hi guys, just looking for a few ideas here, is all. As you can see from the pics below, I need some material to fill the open space. As a note, I did not choose the maple or boxwoods and I did not choose their placement. So my apologies if those plants aren't ideal for the area. Secondly, the juniper by the porch will be removed next season. That's just not what they want to concentrate their money on.

What I thinking, and please feel free to be critical, is different blooms throughout the year to keep the place colorful. I think the maple should be a focal point and I need a few contrasting colors to move the eyes toward the maple. And I don't expect anybody to do my work for me, I'm just more or less brainstorming and looking for ideas from different minds. So thank you for you help.

yamadooski
10-19-2009, 07:42 AM
maple. And I don't expect anybody to do my work for me, I'm just more or less brainstorming and looking for ideas from different minds. So thank you for you help.[/QUOTE]


So you are 21 and brainstorming and if someone here tells you about an idea and you like it and you use it, who did the work?
I have been doing this for 18 years and what did I do before the internet?
I brainstormed and drew several different ideas and slept on it and made a decision the next day.
That is the problem with our society now days is you can have everyone do your work for free from the web.

93Chevy
10-19-2009, 08:07 AM
I'm not relying on the internet, I'm using it as a resource.

Since we have never met each other, I won't take this personally. But since you don't know me, please don't make assumptions that I will steal ideas and pass them off as my own.

Sorry for posting this thread, a mod can take it down if they feel it necessary. It's not going anywhere, and I have the design ready.

yamadooski
10-19-2009, 05:50 PM
No I dont know you and yes you are renaming the term "resource".
YOu really sound like Obama and renaming his cap and trade policy.
I dont really try to be a jerk, it just is really annoying to see people on here asking for help in design.
I understand putting up a design after its finished then asking for critique and handling negative or postitive feedback.

I actually had a lawn guy in my area ask me to design something for his customer and I told him it would be $600.00 he fell over dead and asked why?
I told him Im not going to do his work for him for free.

mdlwn1
10-19-2009, 05:54 PM
Why not steal a good idea?

93Chevy
10-19-2009, 06:31 PM
No I dont know you and yes you are renaming the term "resource".
YOu really sound like Obama and renaming his cap and trade policy.
I dont really try to be a jerk, it just is really annoying to see people on here asking for help in design.
I understand putting up a design after its finished then asking for critique and handling negative or postitive feedback.

I actually had a lawn guy in my area ask me to design something for his customer and I told him it would be $600.00 he fell over dead and asked why?
I told him Im not going to do his work for him for free.

Alright, fair enough.

My original intent wasn't to steal anybody's design. After some thought today, I realized that asking for help on this design may lead to me to use a design and not give credit.

I'll eat my lunch on this. Consider this an apology. Again, my original intent wasn't to steal, but after some thought, I realized that if i did use somebody's ideas without giving proper credit, that's plagiarism, which is a form of theft.

But again, we don't know each other, so I'm weighing my chances of you actually believing me. Obviously you don't have a good impression of me so far. And if it makes a difference, I don't care for Obama.

Steiner
10-19-2009, 07:33 PM
To get this back on track:

I would use some clusters of 3-5 plants since you already have a specimen plant (maple). Not sure about your area or the sun intensity but I have always liked ornamental grasses such as feather reed grass (karl forester). I also personally love all varieties of lilac as they give a nice fragrance during bloom, which is especially nice near a frequently traveled area. I also use a ton of barberry which you can get in 3 colors (small and grows slow)

Give us the soil and or sun info and we can make a good decision.

Maybe talk to your supplier and see what they sell a lot of?

STRINGALATION
10-19-2009, 07:39 PM
well for what its worth.
1. maybe another row of contrasting shrubs behind the row of woood
2.maybe the bulb game .... tulips and gladiolas.
3. firm believer in a landscape changing per season.
4. i go with atleast 7 different plants in a landscape
5. maybe a hosta bed on the ends.

i'll do a mock up tonight to express my view will post later and if you like i dont need credit you asked for help so i help. to give help and then put a price on it is not help thats a service. there are enough customers out here not to charge or even relly worry about another company. "GREEN INDUSTRY UNITE"

STRINGALATION
10-19-2009, 07:40 PM
Hey steiner like your thinking as welll really similiar

mdlwn1
10-19-2009, 07:57 PM
Contrast?...It's a red brick house. Anything not red will contrast. How about moving the maple forward a bit and planting a mass of Azailias or sim behind the maple and trail them toward the left. Then transition into something smaller that is a different shade of green. Most colors will not show well against a red backdrop. Try and mimic nature with mass plantings. You can also leave room for a flower bed in front somewhere. As far as plagiarism..who even cares? Look online at landscape drawings and copy them if you want. Unless they really want it...the worse thing you could do is put 3 of these..3 of those..type of thing.

93Chevy
10-19-2009, 08:31 PM
To get this back on track:

I would use some clusters of 3-5 plants since you already have a specimen plant (maple). Not sure about your area or the sun intensity but I have always liked ornamental grasses such as feather reed grass (karl forester). I also personally love all varieties of lilac as they give a nice fragrance during bloom, which is especially nice near a frequently traveled area. I also use a ton of barberry which you can get in 3 colors (small and grows slow)

Give us the soil and or sun info and we can make a good decision.

Maybe talk to your supplier and see what they sell a lot of?

Thanks for you reply. I actually did suggest golden barberry to contrast the red. The way I look at it, I have a constant (8-9 months) red, and constant green. I'd like a golden color throughout the year. I was thinking a cluster of three between center and the porch.

Sun is moderate to full and the soil is like a light clay. Before I plant the center, I will till and amend the bed with peat moss and good topsoil to promote easy root growth. I just didn't tell the other day because I wasn't aware that the customer already had plants picked out. I thought I was just doing the tear out that day. But no matter.

well for what its worth.
1. maybe another row of contrasting shrubs behind the row of woood
2.maybe the bulb game .... tulips and gladiolas.
3. firm believer in a landscape changing per season.
4. i go with atleast 7 different plants in a landscape
5. maybe a hosta bed on the ends.

i'll do a mock up tonight to express my view will post later and if you like i dont need credit you asked for help so i help. to give help and then put a price on it is not help thats a service. there are enough customers out here not to charge or even relly worry about another company. "GREEN INDUSTRY UNITE"

Thank you also for your reply. I also enjoy changing blooms throughout the season. I had mentioned to the customer a variety of perennials, and she mentioned that she had a lot around back. I guess there's really no problem with using the customer's product to complete the job, I'm just not used to doing it that way.

As far as 7 different plants, this is what I have so far:
1 red maple
11 winter gem boxwoods
3 barberry
5-7 colorful sun perennials...apparently the variety is limited to what the customer has "around "back"
Possibly 2 American holly as a foundation planting on the left wall
Possibly a massing of daylillies on the radius center to the maple

Contrast?...It's a red brick house. Anything not red will contrast. How about moving the maple forward a bit and planting a mass of Azailias or sim behind the maple and trail them toward the left. Then transition into something smaller that is a different shade of green. Most colors will not show well against a red backdrop. Try and mimic nature with mass plantings. You can also leave room for a flower bed in front somewhere. As far as plagiarism..who even cares? Look online at landscape drawings and copy them if you want. Unless they really want it...the worse thing you could do is put 3 of these..3 of those..type of thing.

I tried to convince her, basically pleaded, to pull the maple forward. But she wouldn't have it. I was planning on a massing daylillies on the maple radius line a few feet behind the winter gems.


Thanks for the replies. Do you think a yellow/gold would be a good contrast to the house?

STRINGALATION
10-20-2009, 03:05 AM
THIS ONE IS
1 YOUR BOXWOODS KEPT SMALL
2 roseglow baberries
3 golden mop cypress


just a thought i started to put hostas under the maple and scatter tulips in the front but had to leave earlier

http://i227.photobucket.com/albums/dd159/STRINGALATION/nethelp.jpg

AGLA
10-20-2009, 08:43 AM
Asking for suggestions is not the same thing as stealing. We all have a choice of whether or not we want to help.

One thing that I would strongly suggest is to step way back and look at the entire house. Right now you are looking at only this space on its own. Even if you are only working in this space you need to look at the bigger picture as this is how the rest of the world will see the landscape.

The dominant element is the house. Whatever you do will affect the appearance of the house and be effected by the house in return. You have a big front door entrance and a garage protruding well to the front of the lot. Architecturally, this is a poor way to present a house to an arriving guest or a passer by because the front door is in the background. The best thing you can do is to make the front door the focal point and avoid drawing even more attention to the garage or loading the space to throw the balance of the entire landscape out of whack.

I would start by visually removing the garage wall by using larger inconspicuous evergreen shrubs. I'd drop the height of the plantings and add more color nearer to the entrance. If I used a low hedge of boxwood, I would not have it follow the walk. I would run it parallel to the garage and the front wall to create a wider presentation of the front door entrance. I'd keep a row of even height medium height shrubs under the windows (these could be strong foliage or flower color). The void between it and the walk could be grass if it is big enough, or a low ground cover.

If you could repeat the same effect of color and low growth on the other side of the entrance to frame it in, that would help. You would not need to repeat the boxwood.

That is justy one way to look at it, not necessarilly the best way.

ron mexico75
10-20-2009, 09:17 AM
I would start by visually removing the garage wall by using larger inconspicuous evergreen shrubs. I'd drop the height of the plantings and add more color nearer to the entrance.


I agree with this. Soften up that long hard brick wall that is the garage with some evergreens. Nicer backdrop then brick. You could add some perennials such as coreopsis and salvia...at least for summer color.

Dreams To Designs
10-20-2009, 10:00 AM
Tim, this is a very important spot in this home's landscape. This would be a blast to design, and should be designed and imagined, but that will cost money. Money well spent in this and most design scenarios.

AGLA has given you some very good basic design advice, you would do well to heed it and keep things simple and in tune with the home's exterior. Hopefully you can see from Stringulation's image, the peril of red, yellow and orange brick. This may please some, and your client should be the judge of that.

Somehow, somewhere you need to incorporate a vertical element into this landscape. There are so many horizontal lines with the roofline, windows and brick pattern, it needs some contrast. What variety is the red maple in the garden and where exactly is it?

Kirk

STRINGALATION
10-20-2009, 11:44 AM
ugh heres a good one. you will probably havt to run that down spout somewhere. it looks like a big washout on the ground and the splash pattern. is that a pit to the left of the maple

93Chevy
10-20-2009, 07:27 PM
Little update, I just got an email from the customer regarding further work this year. She wants to leave everything go until spring. Which means I have that much more time to do a good design. I'm strapped for time now, so I hope in a few hours I will be able to respond to each one of you. Thank you so much for you ideas, I promise I will get back shortly.

93Chevy
10-20-2009, 09:37 PM
THIS ONE IS
1 YOUR BOXWOODS KEPT SMALL
2 roseglow baberries
3 golden mop cypress


just a thought i started to put hostas under the maple and scatter tulips in the front but had to leave earlier


Thank you very much for your time to design that. What software is that? I don't think I can upload photos into the software I use, but it does have a good selection of plant and materials.

I really like the color scheme in that pic. Every color contrasts each other and the maple is still clearly visible. What do you think about taking out a few barberrys and adding clusters of daylillies?

93Chevy
10-20-2009, 09:44 PM
Asking for suggestions is not the same thing as stealing. We all have a choice of whether or not we want to help.

One thing that I would strongly suggest is to step way back and look at the entire house. Right now you are looking at only this space on its own. Even if you are only working in this space you need to look at the bigger picture as this is how the rest of the world will see the landscape.

The dominant element is the house. Whatever you do will affect the appearance of the house and be effected by the house in return. You have a big front door entrance and a garage protruding well to the front of the lot. Architecturally, this is a poor way to present a house to an arriving guest or a passer by because the front door is in the background. The best thing you can do is to make the front door the focal point and avoid drawing even more attention to the garage or loading the space to throw the balance of the entire landscape out of whack.

I would start by visually removing the garage wall by using larger inconspicuous evergreen shrubs. I'd drop the height of the plantings and add more color nearer to the entrance. If I used a low hedge of boxwood, I would not have it follow the walk. I would run it parallel to the garage and the front wall to create a wider presentation of the front door entrance. I'd keep a row of even height medium height shrubs under the windows (these could be strong foliage or flower color). The void between it and the walk could be grass if it is big enough, or a low ground cover.

If you could repeat the same effect of color and low growth on the other side of the entrance to frame it in, that would help. You would not need to repeat the boxwood.

That is justy one way to look at it, not necessarilly the best way.

Thank you for your reply and advice. I agree that an evergreen foundation planting is a good idea against the garage. I also plan to mimic the major points of this design onto the other side, whenever that comes about. I like the idea of running the boxwoods parallel to the garage, but the customer loves them where they stand.

As far as a medium-height foundation planting, what about American holly? Or possibly Shamrock Inkberry? The area is mostly full-sun, although along the foundation will be more shade, due to the late-day shadowing.

93Chevy
10-20-2009, 09:45 PM
I agree with this. Soften up that long hard brick wall that is the garage with some evergreens. Nicer backdrop then brick. You could add some perennials such as coreopsis and salvia...at least for summer color.

Thank you for your reply. I do plan on adding colorful perennials, but I want to get the larger shrubs figured out first because the perennials can be intermingled by their color and blooming time.

93Chevy
10-20-2009, 09:54 PM
Tim, this is a very important spot in this home's landscape. This would be a blast to design, and should be designed and imagined, but that will cost money. Money well spent in this and most design scenarios.

AGLA has given you some very good basic design advice, you would do well to heed it and keep things simple and in tune with the home's exterior. Hopefully you can see from Stringulation's image, the peril of red, yellow and orange brick. This may please some, and your client should be the judge of that.

Somehow, somewhere you need to incorporate a vertical element into this landscape. There are so many horizontal lines with the roofline, windows and brick pattern, it needs some contrast. What variety is the red maple in the garden and where exactly is it?

Kirk

Kirk, thank you for your reply and advice. I really appreciate all the help I am receiving from everybody. Hopefully someday I will be able to return the favor. I won't pretend to be good at design, but I really enjoy learning more each time. After I get my business degree, I plan to study for a degree in landscape design. Anyway...

The customer purchased the maple before I got the job. I completed all the tear out and planned to draw up a design, but then she pulled the maple and boxwoods before I was done. Point being, I don't know the variety because she had already removed the tags. All I know is that she said the guy who sold it to her said it was good in the sun and only grew 5-6 feet outward. As far as placement, it is exactly 5' from both walls. I wanted to move it out more, but she insisted and said she'd burden responsibility if it grew too big. I guess I can't really argue with that.

And yes, this is very fun for me. I really want to do a good job on this so that I can add it to my portfolio and keep gaining experience.

93Chevy
10-20-2009, 09:56 PM
ugh heres a good one. you will probably havt to run that down spout somewhere. it looks like a big washout on the ground and the splash pattern. is that a pit to the left of the maple

Oh, didn't think about that. However, the discoloration of the soil in that area in the pics is from when I raked out the area. What about having a bed of river rock a few feet out from the house that I could blend with the mulch bed?

STRINGALATION
10-20-2009, 10:42 PM
HERE IS A LITTLE CHANGE

http://i227.photobucket.com/albums/dd159/STRINGALATION/NETHELPSHOT1.jpg

AGLA
10-20-2009, 11:50 PM
You do have a couple of strong verticals with the columns. I would tend to not want to compete with them with a vertical in that space, especially because it would be in front of the windows. I'd ditch both the maple and the arb.

mdlwn1
10-20-2009, 11:59 PM
HERE IS A LITTLE CHANGE

http://i227.photobucket.com/albums/dd159/STRINGALATION/NETHELPSHOT1.jpg

Seriously?...dude..think....flow..think.....nature. I once saw a mexican with a $200 toyota with pep boys mag wheels. He got out and had bell bottom pants on with a mickey mouse patch. Your "design" reminded me of him.

AGLA
10-21-2009, 07:48 AM
Be careful not to decorate the space instead of landscape the house.

White Gardens
10-21-2009, 08:28 AM
That Maple looks to be a Japanese maple.

If so, and if it is the bigger variety, though it will take time, it will eventually fill most of that corner.

Might want to take that into consideration.

ridgewood
12-16-2009, 09:58 AM
Tim,

This is an interesting space to design and has a few challenges. Obviously the first challenge is the overwhelming amount of brick. My thinking would be to add two trellis's in between the two windows on the left. Either go with a custom built cedar or wrought iron (this is how you can add some profit in to your design) or get something cheap at Home Depot. Attach these two to the brick about 2-3 inches away from the house. There is a wide variety of ways to do this. I would go with climbing hydrangea with a white flower or whatever climber you may like. This is going to immediately soften up the bricks, add height, and an dominant archtectural point in that area.
I would remove the boxwood all together. It just does not work unfortunately. Move the jap maple up and towards the column when u remove the juniper. Now the next step is going to to be based on the customers preference. Do they want something formal or more of a cottage garden feel? Anyways, if you want to go formal, then I think this is a perfect place for bulbs. Daffodils->tulips->iris, possibly go with some cheddar pinks (Dianthus gratianopolitanus) up front then step upwards from back to from. This may be a good area to incorporate a stone border along the walkway to hold in the mulch (upsell upsell lol). The cheddar pinks really have a longstanding color. For the back wall maybe go with an Oakleaf hydrangea. They have cool looking leaves and will give you fall color or some nice pink double knockout roses. I would add a birdbath for sure in the area, its a perfect area for it.
There are just so many ideas, this is when you really have to talk with the customer. If bulbs are no good, then you may want to go with astilbe, hostas and daylilies. (but i dont know what side of the house that picture is on; astilbe like the shade).
I am just really throwing ideas out right now lol. If they want to go more cottage garden feel then do purple coneflower (Echinacea purpurea), english lavender (Lavandula angustifolia), in front go with maybe something like golden moneywort (Lysimachia nummularia 'Aurea') for a nice golden color on your border and throw in some perennial salvia (Salvia nemorosa)
Anyways, sorry its so long, just throwing different ideas out there. Everyone's eye like something different. Good potential in the area. Perfect area for a nice perennial garden, it is enclosed and not to big, so it wont be hard to maintain. Add some triple processed absolute black mulch, and its going to look real nice. let me know if you have any questions. This is fun stuff.

93Chevy
12-16-2009, 11:50 AM
Wow, I forgot about this thread. Thanks for your comments, ridgewood. The customer won't want anything done until Spring, probably due to money issues. I will take you advice. This is the sunny side of the house by the way, so hosta and astilbe won't like it too much. Better suited for sunny plants. Thanks again.

anotherturfgeek
01-01-2010, 04:32 PM
1st, the maple will get huge! it is too close to the house. The roots are going into the foundation and there will be issues...

mshane
08-30-2010, 09:57 AM
Oh my! That was really lovely. I'd send you pictures of my lawn and maybe you can make a rough draft for my landscape too :) Keep it up! More power!
landscaping (http://www.lilandscapedesigns.com/)

Escapes Landscape Design
09-23-2010, 08:03 PM
Do yourself a favor and look for inspiration in your native landscape. Drive around, take pictures, go to a nursery. This always helps me. Start critiquing other people's work. Get a design magazine subscription and critique it. You will be fine. Do some hand drawings or whatever gets the creative juices flowing. Good luck.