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mikez
05-09-2002, 02:22 AM
I have bad Quack Grass in by Bluegrass lawn. I would like to kill it with out killing the Bluegrass. I have heard Kerb will do that. Does anyone know were to buy Kerb and if it works. Any other suggestions would be a great help.

tremor
05-09-2002, 12:26 PM
Mike,

Kerb is ony labeled for use in lawns composed of the following: Bermudagrass, Centipedegrass, St. Augustinegrass, & Zoysiagrass. Kerb is often used to "remove" or "help transition" Perennial Ryegrass from overseeded Bermuda. At 4 lbs/Acre, Kerb is labeled for control of Kentucky Bluegrass.

see the label

http://www.bluebooktor.com/Library/..\docs\label\L28905.PDF

While not selective, Roundup will control Quack & allow you to reseed (almost) immediately. Kerb requiures a 90 day wait if not deactivated with charcoal.

If you let the Quack grow high above the Bluegrass canopy, you may be able to glove or wick Roundup only onto the Quack without damaging the blues.

Steve

lawnstudent
05-09-2002, 09:07 PM
Mike,

from my experience, Quack is out of control this year in the Chicago area. Wish there was a magic bullet cause I could make a mint selling a Quack solution.

jim

GroundKprs
05-11-2002, 06:22 PM
After your bluegrass goes to seed (around Memorial Day in a normal year), the leaf growth will begin to slow down. However, quackgrass seeds much later, so quackgrass leaves are still going to grow well. Sometime in early June, if you observe the quack is growing well, skip a mowing and let the quackgrass grow up above the blue, and you can wick treat as suggested above.

Treat with a wicking tool, glove (explained in <a href="http://www.lawnsite.com/showthread.php?postid=255428#post255428">THIS POST</a>), or, for a few offending grassy weeds, you can paint Roundup on individual leaves with a small type artist's brush.

MOW ED
05-17-2002, 10:02 AM
Great information. I have a customer that has a massive infestation of quack on a 10 K lawn and it would literally take me a month to wick roundup to each blade.
The lawn is healthy but the quack is all over amongst the blue. He asks me if there is something I can do about it every year and every year I tell him the same thing.

Barkleymut
04-06-2003, 08:32 PM
Well Quackgrass has overtaken my own yard this spring so I'm out to kill it. I asked at Lesco and he suggested Fusilade. He said others have had success with it even though quack isn't on the label. I'll try it soon and let ya'll know the results.

Greenie
04-08-2003, 07:12 AM
I tried to spot treat and wick the Quack Grass for 3 years, it just continued to get worse. Last summer I killed the lawn with Round-up wherever the quack grass was growing. After the lawn died off I tilled the treated area, added 50 yards of loam and tilled it in. Despite all that work I still have random sprigs of Quack Grass in the new lawn - it's incredibily resiliant. I'll keep on wicking the sprigs, but it's really discouraging.

lawnstudent
04-08-2003, 01:36 PM
Originally posted by Greenie
I tried to spot treat and wick the Quack Grass for 3 years, it just continued to get worse. Last summer I killed the lawn with Round-up wherever the quack grass was growing. After the lawn died off I tilled the treated area, added 50 yards of loam and tilled it in. Despite all that work I still have random sprigs of Quack Grass in the new lawn - it's incredibily resiliant. I'll keep on wicking the sprigs, but it's really discouraging.

Quack grass has incredibly strong rhizomes, this is why it is so hard to kill Quack grass. When you spray Quack grass with a glyphosate herbicide like Roundup you should wait a couple of weeks and then spray again. Let the Roundup translocate throughout the Quack grass a few days before you rototill. If any of those rhizomes are alive when you rototill, you will have new Quack grass plants sprouting again. Good luck.

jim

GroundKprs
04-08-2003, 02:09 PM
Well, since my above comment almost a year ago, there is a new idea on quackgrass. Testing has been underway on a new selective control in C3 grasses for annual bluegrass, poa triv, quackgrass and yellow nutsedge. It is now out in university testing, to determine efficacies and dosages. It's not named yet, known as MON 44951, and won't be out until 2004 at earliest. Testing on bentgrass so far has gotten 70% reduction of poa triv, without unacceptable phyto to bent. Needs multiple apps, and timing and # of apps is still being worked out.

So, instead of tearing hair out about quackgrass, maybe just ignore it for another year or two, and see what this new product winds up doing.

lordohturf
04-08-2003, 07:23 PM
Mike:

Fusilade II is labeled for quackgrass to 6 or 8 inch height.

Bluegrass is not on the controlled species list.

YOu might want to try a small area to see what happens.

If no damage to blue, go for it in a bigger way!

www.bluebooktor.com is a great source for labels, msds, etc.
Better yet, it's free!

"When all else fails, read the directions."

Rob T
04-08-2003, 08:03 PM
Just to add onto Jims idea of treating with a wetted glove. I have another "tool" that works well for treating around small ornamentals in beds.

Take a soda bottle and cut the bottom off. With the bottom cut off, attach the bottle to the end of your spray wand on your hand sprayer so that the nozzle sprays inside of the bottle through the bottle neck.

This setup uses the bottle as a shield and allows you to drench a weed inserted into the bottom of the bottle. You can only spray one weed at a time with this setup but it gets plenty of roundup on the target and you'll only need one app. Works great for Thistle.

osc
04-11-2003, 10:19 PM
MSMA

Meier
04-14-2003, 01:30 AM
++++Take a soda bottle and cut the bottom off. With the bottom cut off, attach the bottle to the end of your spray wand on your hand sprayer so that the nozzle sprays inside of the bottle through the bottle neck.

This setup uses the bottle as a shield and allows you to drench a weed inserted into the bottom of the bottle. You can only spray one weed at a time with this setup but it gets plenty of roundup on the target and you'll only need one app. Works great for Thistle.++++

I was actually thinking of something like this myself. I do weekly bed weed control when I mow as an add on service. Most customers take it. I've been trying to treat bermuda and nutsedge in the beds with Glyphosphate, but I've been really worried about the spray drifting onto the desired plants.

I'll try this out. I assume you're talking about 20 oz bottle of pop? The plastic ones? I guess you just let gravity pull the shield down to the ground while holding the nozzle a few inches off the weed and squeeze the trigger?

Sounds like a pretty good invention.

Later,
DFW, TX