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View Full Version : Who knows the name of this evergreen???


Twitchy
10-24-2009, 02:52 PM
I'm stuck on this evergreen, none of the wholesale nurseries can give me a straight answer. It's a med-lg evergreen (8'-10') shrub that is about 1-2 weeks past full bloom, dense branch structure, VERY fragrant little white flowers, smell almost like honeysuckle. The leaves are thick and dark green w/ a small point at the end of the older leaves (maybe ilex family). I've come up w/a couple possibilities, Fagraea fragrans, Ilex Pedunculosa. For 10 points, who out there has the right answer??? I live on Long Island by the way.

SunState Lawn Care inc
10-24-2009, 03:09 PM
Indian hawthorne maybe?

Twitchy
10-24-2009, 03:24 PM
Indian hawthorne maybe?
Most of the hawthorne's produce their flowers in spring and early summer. This one started mid fall. Thanks

Strick
10-25-2009, 12:08 PM
Similar to a Fragrant Tea Olive "Osmanthus Fragrans"

Horizon Lawn
10-25-2009, 03:35 PM
Looks maybe like some type of laurel

EagleLandscape
10-25-2009, 05:03 PM
definitely not indian hawthorne. 100% positive on that one.

did you find that outside in new york?

EagleLandscape
10-25-2009, 05:07 PM
...........................

Twitchy
10-27-2009, 03:34 PM
definitely not indian hawthorne. 100% positive on that one.

did you find that outside in new york?
Yep, well established too. Probably 9'-10' tall and the same around. You smell it from the neighbor's property. Some what of a part sun/ filtered sun location ( tall sycamores around the area).

sjessen
10-27-2009, 05:26 PM
Yep, well established too. Probably 9'-10' tall and the same around. You smell it from the neighbor's property. Some what of a part sun/ filtered sun location ( tall sycamores around the area).

Does it smell like licorice? If so, it might be anise. Just a guess.

AGLA
10-27-2009, 08:25 PM
Delavay Tea Olive
Osmanthus delavayi

wurkn with amish
10-27-2009, 09:58 PM
In Horticopia it looks like Fragrant Tea olive- Osmanthus

Twitchy
10-28-2009, 11:09 AM
Delavay Tea Olive
Osmanthus delavayi
"Delavay Tea Olive (O. delavayi): This is one of the few SPRING-flowering tea olives, blooming in April. Flowers are showy, profuse, white and fragrant. It grows into an arching mound 6 to 10 feet tall by 6 to 10 feet wide, but can easily be kept smaller. The leaves are smaller than those of other tea olives, only 1 inch long by ½ inch wide. They are shiny, TOOTHED and dark green." This is description i got off the internet. Getting close though.

Twitchy
10-28-2009, 11:19 AM
This is another description i got from plantwiki.com
"The ovate leaves of the Osmanthus fragrans are from 3” to 6” long and up to about 2” wide. They are rich green in color with a glossy surface. The shrub is densely foliated and upright growing, maturing to at least 8 feet wide and 10 feet tall in cultivation.

Fragrant Tea Olives bloom from spring through fall, filling the air with delicious scent that is described as similar to the fruit of peaches or apricots. The tiny tubular white flowers grow in clusters and are not noticeable enough to be deemed ornamental. What they lack in beauty is more than made up for with their perfume in spring and most abundantly in the fall. The blue-black berries produced from the Tea Olive’s blooms are an important source of winter food for wild birds.

The Osmanthus fragrans is easy to grow and drought tolerant. It is best planted in full sun to partial shade and adapts to a variety of soils. Fragrant Tea Olive is hardy in zone 7-9 in North America. Once established, this is a somewhat drought tolerant evergreen that is resistant to plant pests and diseases." Maybe this is IT...

AGLA
10-28-2009, 02:37 PM
I'm not familiar with either personally. I looked at so many cultivars that I lost track of which was the spring bloom. I also believe it is the fragrans after looking back after the Amish guy's post. I backed off of fragrans when I looked it up because it is supposed to be the leat hardy, but Long Island is pretty mild from what I understand.

Looking at more photos, I'd go with fragrans.

Caterkillar
11-21-2009, 10:42 AM
Delavay Tea Olive
Osmanthus delavayi

I think you are right. They have a profuse fragrance in the spring and when tempatures cool down in the fall, they usually have a fragrance as well but not quite as profuse.

allinearth
11-21-2009, 02:07 PM
Here we call them sweet olive. Not sure of the technical name.